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Using semicolons in between identifiers instead of writing them side by side does it eg: [@author_journal_year; @author2_journal2_year2]


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Use the option --extract-media=pandocConversionMedia to specify a directory pandocConversionMedia where the images will be saved. This will be created by pandoc. So the call would be: pandoc -f docx -t latex --extract-media=pandocConversionMedia -o pandocOutputWithMedia.tex input.docx


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I finally solved this issue after a few hours of thinking. The key idea is to somehow get the numbers that pandoc could have used if it could convert the citations and replace them in .tex after pandoc processing! The steps will be find all usage of citations in the paper Put a mapping of citation key --> [@citation key] at the end of markdown Run pandoc ...


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The correct solution is \usepackage{float} \let\origfigure=\figure \let\endorigfigure=\endfigure \renewenvironment{figure}[1][]{% \begin{figure*} }{% \end{figure*} }


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An alternative is to use the pandoc-eqnos filter, which processes attributed formulas. e.g., $$ (K_{0}^{-1}x)^{T}E(K_{1}^{-1}x')=0 $$ {#eq:foo} When pandoc's output format is set to LaTeX or pdf, attributed formulas are converted by pandoc-eqnos to numbered LaTeX equations. The equation may be referenced as Eq. @eq:foo. To get the numbering style you ...


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Indeed, there is almost a perfect way to do so. But you have to pay for that, the solution is Tex2Word. In order to get the best results, firstly you change to the the basic document class, e.g. article and avoid using self-defined styles. If you are using bibtex, then you just copy the content in bbl file to the tex file. Finally, open your tex file with MS ...



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