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2

If you do not have vertical lines, then this can be solved by \noalign{\vspace{6pt}} Full example: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{p{4cm}p{4cm}} Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur & adipisicing elit\\ \noalign{\vspace{6pt}}% sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore & et dolore magna aliqua.\\ ...


2

The \\ mechanism can be used, but one has to account for the height of the \parbox, either manually or automatically. The other option, if all rows are to be adjusted, is to use the \extrarowheight parameter of the array package, or else \arraystretch as was mentioned in the comments. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{array} \begin{document} ORIGINAL ...


5

You could put a strut in the first column. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{p{4cm}p{4cm}} Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur\rule[-6pt]{0pt}{6pt} & adipisicing elit \\ sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore & et dolore magna aliqua.\\ \end{tabular} \end{document}


0

Another, using the makecellpackage for a better vertical spacing and hhline to make the square. No need for nscenter environment. \documentclass[a4paper,10pt]{report} \usepackage[margin=0.45cm]{geometry} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{fontspec} \defaultfontfeatures{Mapping=tex-text} \setmainfont{Verdana} \usepackage{array, tabularx} ...


0

Tabulars have some spacing around them. The easiest way to keep stuff aligned is to keep it in the tabular. In this case, though, you need different column specifications. So it would be best to use tabulars of uniform width. You can use tabular* for this as I do for one of the tabulars, but I also used the tabularx package. This requires at least one column ...


3

It looks like you're using the threeparttable environment in a somewhat unusual way. To quote from the user guide of the threeparttable package: This package facilitates tables with titles (captions) and notes. The title and notes are given a width equal to the body of the table (a tabular environment). By itself, a threeparttable does not float, but ...


7

You're missing a blank line before \doublespacing \textbf{Lab Partner:} Marcus The paragraph has not yet ended, so \doublespacing takes over. However, I'd do it differently from switching between double and single spacing: set (locally) a non zero \parskip: \documentclass[11pt,letterpaper]{article} ...


3

The insertion of an empty item seems to give a better vertical spacing. One can define a myitemize environment that includes this empty item; that will prevent typing it for each description item: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{enumitem} \newenvironment{myitemize}% {\begin{itemize}\item[]} {\end{itemize}} \begin{document} \begin{description}[style ...


4

Adding \leavevmode also has the desired effect and looks reasonably clean. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{description} \item[Animals:]\leavevmode \begin{itemize} \item Dog \item Cat \item Fish \end{itemize} \item[Colors:]\leavevmode \begin{itemize} \item Red \item Green \item Blue \end{itemize} \end{description} ...


1

Works fine here: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{threeparttable,tabularx,booktabs,kantlipsum} \begin{document} \kant[1-3] \paragraph*{Real interest rate}is the lending rate adjusted for the price level. The inflation adjustment is made via the GDP deflator. \begin{threeparttable} \label{varmacro} \caption{\footnotesize Variables sources} ...


2

So, similar to the last answer, you will need to pull in the lines appropriate to paragraph and subparagraph. These use some different things to make the headings, including different ways of spacing and indenting the sections. I've annotated a few things in the MWE below. See also this great answer for more about how the \@startsection command works so ...


4

As your paragraphs are mostly one line, the indentation doesn't show up so much, I marked the indented lines in red, and the non-indented lines in green,


2

As the comments on your question said, you want one of \smallskip, \medskip, bigskip, or \vspace{<amount>}. As an example (note that \vspace accepts absolute length in pt, mm, cm, or in, and relative length with ex—the height of an 'x' in the current font—and with the more common em, the width of an uppercase 'M'). ...


4

Though you caould use the parskip package, the safest thing to do here would be to switch to scrartcl and use one of its parskip options (there's half, full and some + and * variants): \documentclass[twoside,parskip=half]{scrartcl} \bibliographystyle{nature} \usepackage{lipsum} % Package to generate dummy text throughout this template ...


3

The example is hardly minimal but I've gone with it anyway. parskip is the recommended way to use vertical spacing for paragraph separation: \documentclass[twoside]{article} \bibliographystyle{nature} \usepackage{parskip} \usepackage{lipsum} % Package to generate dummy text throughout this template %\usepackage[sc]{mathpazo} % Use the Palatino font ...


2

Redefine \par globally is very dangerous. But limited to an environment it could be possible add some elements without writing any command. Example: (not guarantee of safety in a real document) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xcolor} \newenvironment{crazypar}{%at begin \smallskip \def\par{% \pdfprimitive\par\noindent\rule{\textwidth}{0.4mm}% ...



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