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\documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{ocgx} \usepackage{enumerate} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \begin{enumerate} \item \setocgs{ocg1 ocg2 ocg3}{ocg1}{ocg2 ocg3}{A-PNG} \item \setocgs{ocg1 ocg2 ocg3}{ocg2}{ocg1 ocg3}{B-PNG} \item \setocgs{ocg1 ocg2 ocg3}{ocg3}{ocg1 ocg2}{C-PNG} \end{enumerate} \providecommand{\pica}[1]{ ...


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While I'd definitely say you are better off loading hyperref, I still recommend using the bookmark package (by the same author). One good reason is that bookmark will populate the PDF bookmarks on the first run. Here's a simple example: \documentclass{mwart} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{xcolor} %\usepackage{hyperref} %\hypersetup{ % colorlinks, ...


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Here is a solution. With \pagenumbering{gobble} and \pagenumbering{arabic} \documentclass[12pt]{report} \usepackage{hyperref} \usepackage{pdfpages} \begin{document} \pagenumbering{gobble} \input{./texfrontpage.tex} \includepdf[pages={1,2}]{./pdf/information-page-one.pdf, ./pdf/information-page-two.pdf} \begin{abstract} Interesting stuff. ...


4

This is plain tex but you could do the same in latex. \setbox0=\vbox{\hsize=7.8cm some text to fill out several lines of a paragraph with a high proportion of g and y and f so that the depth is non zero some text to fill out several lines of a paragraph with a high proportion of g and y and f so that the depth is non zero some text to fill out several ...


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What I meant by my original comment is this: with pandoc -t html5 -o test.pdf test.md you can bypass LaTeX entirely; you are only required to install wkhtmltopdf, which is a single executable like pandoc on windows. Results as follows: You may control the output with css.


4

I'd use RedNotebook for notes and small documents. It's really a journal or diary, but it lets me to take quick notes with (modified) markdown and MathJax (with webkit), and then, if necessary, to export to html or pdf or LaTeX. If I type: = Title = Here is a //short document// including Markdown and Math, here is the equation: $$f(x)=x^2$$ ...


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This is possible with pandoc. If the Markdown you've posted is in the file test.md you can generate a PDF called test.pdf with the following command: pandoc test.md -o test.pdf The PDF file looks like this: pandoc converts the Markdown to a PDF using LaTeX. It recognizes that the input is Markdown from the file extension, but if you use a different ...


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It also works completely without hyperref. You first have to declare a \newcounter in the preamble. Then, instead of setting the PDF page labels at the first numbering change, you set the counter. You then set the PDF page labels at the second numbering change, using the counter's value for the start of the second entry. \documentclass{report} ...


0

You pointed me in the right direction I used hyperref in my document but put pdfpagelabels=false which should be true :)


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Check out this extensive answer. Solutions range from using gs to pdfsizeopt.


2

In comments you added the relevant PostScript code: (Classifiers) [9.36057 3.95929 6.24078 5.51782 5.51782 3.95929 4.68082 3.95929 6.12003 4.68085 0 ] xsh xsh will be a defined alias in the file header for xshow the postscript command for letterspaced text, with the spacing being given by the numbers in the square brackets. xshow isn't supported by psfrag ...


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The "convert" utility from imagemagick tools may help you. These are essentially command-line tools. You don't say which operating system are you using, but if it's windows you may also find this page useful. Basic usage: on a command-line terminal type: convert -quality 75% file.pdf file.jpg You can also convert to other formats (png, etc.) and use a ...


0

If you do not want to modify the source file, another possibility could be to use the option -output-format=dvi when compiling with pdflatex. It works for me with TeX Live under Windows. Remember to place the option before input file name. Just as an example, to produce a dvi output I use the following compile command: ...


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After exploring different solutions, I found that the foxit pdf reader is the most easy and reliable solution to add text on pdf file. Using the "comment"->"typewriter" feature of foxit reader, you can put text in pdf file with a result that can be recognized by acrobat nicely and later print nice filled form.


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Simply add bookmarksopen=true for the default bookmarks-open to also expand them. I will refrain from posting a screenshot as my viewer ignores all these options anyway and acroread simply takes forever to even consider possibly thinking about sometime in the distant future opening a file. (But the OP confirmed that it works in Adobe's viewer.) ...


2

According to the documentation of bookmark you can use the open option; if you want to set the level, you can say openlevel=<level>; so \usepackage[open,openlevel=1]{bookmark} will show something like whereas the simple open option will show Tested with Skim and Adobe Reader on Mac OS X.


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Use the package option final as explained on page 4 of the documentation.



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