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3

Maybe you can use features provided by your editor. In case of emacs, you can use time-stamp. First, you have to adjust the variables time-stamp-format and time-stamp-pattern. I suggest using file local versions by putting something like this at the end of your document: %%% Local Variables: %%% mode: latex %%% eval: (set (make-local-variable ...


2

The problem is that you are doing an \includegraphics{} on a EPS file that is invalid. When this happened to me, the EPS file hadn't changed in a year, so I have to assume it was the newer version of XeLaTeX that I was using (either a new bug, or the new version is less tolerant of sloppy EPS files. How to find the EPS that causes this problem: Sadly the ...


-1

There seems to be a package Datetime. This seems to print the time zone too. Using the command \DTMnow Refer to http://ctan.org/pkg/datetime2


7

This can be done by running an external program, for example, date on Unix systems. The output can be redirected to a file and then read by TeX. On Unix systems, also piping is possible. Example: \documentclass{article} \immediate\write18{date >\jobname.date} \begin{document} Current time is: \input{\jobname.date} \end{document} The shell ...


12

Package hyperref hyperref encodes correctly, but the options should be set after hyperref is loaded. Otherwise LaTeX expands the options the hard way and hyperref will only see the expanded garbage. \usepackage{hyperref} \hypersetup{ pdfauthor={Erwin Schrödinger}, } Extended example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}% utf8, for ...


1

May be there are better solutions, but this worked out well for me. If you use adobe, you can easily save the .pdf file in .ps format. This is pretty much the same way as when you save a .doc file as .pdf.


1

You should start by printing a test page with a few screenshots on it as they will appear in your final document. This will tell you if the images look good enough printed for your purposes. In general, as long as you don't scale your screenshots, they should look just about as good as they can on paper. If you do need to scale a screenshot (e.g. shrink it ...


4

If you decide to use .png files in your document, it's fine, you could print some test pages to see the result, but remember that along with .jpg, these are raster images. This means that they have a fixed number of pixels and may (will) lose quality when changing resolution, such as zooming in. So you might want to use bigger resolutions, enough for ...


0

I like egreg solution a lot, and I have enhanced it a bit. I created a Makefile that I modified to: compile and run bibtex so that all references are correct compile only the chapters that I need. Here it goes: SRC = main DST = book.pdf LATEX = pdflatex FLAGSLATEX = -interaction=batchmode BIBTEX = bibtex FLAGSBIB = -terse INDEX = makeindex ${DST} : ...


6

pdfTeX File hparc.pdf has embeded the font LMRoman12-Regular as OpenType font as used in Adobe Illustrator: $ pdffonts hparc.pdf name type emb sub uni object ID ------------------------------------ ----------------- --- --- --- --------- PJUQXT+LMRoman12-Regular Type 1C yes yes no 5 ...


1

Thank you, @ChristianClason, your suggestion worked. I see now that this is essentially a duplicate of the following question: PDF bookmarks for sections and subsections with the llncs class Here is the solution with the suggested extra line: \documentclass{siamltex} \usepackage{hyperref} \setcounter{tocdepth}{3} \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} ...


3

The listings package allows the inclusion (and syntactic highlighting) of code. The code either comes from a file, like \lstinputlisting[frame=single,language=C++,numbers=left]{myfile.cc} Here, decorated with a frame and line numbering. Or is directly written in the LaTeX source : \begin{lstlisting} cout << "hello, world" << ...


3

Regarding the second alternative, check out listings package.


11

This uses the attachfile2 package (the attached file is just the ordinary hello world example in C (ok, it's not Matlab ;-)) \documentclass{article} \usepackage[pdfversion=1.7]{hyperref} \usepackage{attachfile2} \begin{document} This is the famous Hello World example: \attachfile[color=0 1 0,description={The famous Hello World example}]{helloworld.c} ...


19

The PDF format includes file attachments, which means other files can be attached much like in emails. One package that can do this is the attachfile package. This package inserts a link to the attached file in the document text. My preferred package is navigator. Navigator simply attaches the file; nothing appears in the document. The file is accessed ...


1

The error message !pdfTeX error: pdflatex (file [...]/most_changed_from_default_pos_0.pdf): PDF inclusion: required page does not exist <18> does not mean the requested page number with the appended <18>. This number is the total number of pages. That means, the file [...]/most_changed_from_default_pos_0.pdf_tex requests a page number that is ...


0

I know this is an old question, but here is an alternative approach, based on an idea from Automatically create two PDF output files from one tex file [duplicate] (accidentally I have posted the answer at Can one TeX file output to multiple PDF files?first) The idea is to write at begin of each chapter some commands (including the page numbers where to ...


4

I've tried a number of options, including converting with Inkscape and using pdftops with the eps flag turned on. Both have problems with certain fonts. The online tools and ImageMagick both rasterize the image unacceptably. I found that the most effective process is to convert in two steps: first convert the .pdf to .ps using pdftops, which preserves the ...


1

I know this is an old question, but here is an alternative approach, based on an idea from Automatically create two PDF output files from one tex file [duplicate] The idea is to write at begin of each chapter some commands (including the page numbers where to split the pdf) in a batch-file and after LaTex has finished, run the script to split the pdf into ...


0

Even though I first did not notice, the comment by Sigur appeared to be the correct answer - thanks for that! When making the main file to be the Master Document, one can compile each chapter separately without the need to compile the main file. Then, when running pdflatex and viewing the internal .pdf file, it shows me the exact place where I am editing ...


0

The above answer is correct. For reasons of completeness I would like to add the results of my own failed attempt, in order to illustrate different aspects of the problem. If I use raisebox, my code becomes like this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{hyperref} \begin{document} \begin{flushleft} \begin{Form} \renewcommand{\baselinestretch}{1.0} ...


3

I would use a tabular along with booktabs: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{booktabs} \usepackage{hyperref} \begin{document} \begin{Form} \begin{tabular}{@{}p{11.5cm}@{}} \TextField[name=First and Last Name, width=8cm, borderwidth=1]{}\\\midrule[0.5pt] advisor, \hspace{2cm} Date\\[2.5ex] \TextField[name=First and Last Name, width=8cm, ...


0

I recommend it convert -density 300 drawing.pdf drawing.png The density 300 means the resolution or dots per inch(DPI). If you are not satisfied for image resolution, try it for 600 DPI.


2

The mentioned page lists the more useful information, which PDF variant is required. It is essentially pdf-a, whereas PDF/A-1a is the most preferred one. However, having doubts that pdflatex is smart enough to add document structure, you might have to rely on PDF/A-1b, or PDF/A-2b. In any case, you will have to provide sufficient Metadata. A standard way ...


4

Use GhostScript (gs) to embed all fonts Compile your document normally, and then process it with this command: gs -DSAFER -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -sDEVICE=pdfwrite -dEmbedAllFonts=true -sOutputFile=$NEWFILE.pdf -f $YOURFILE.pdf (Replace $YOURFILE.pdf with the name of the file produced by pdflatex, and $NEWFILE.pdf by the name of the file you want to obtain) ...



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