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11

You're dividing by nearly zero, so that result is in a way expected. You could use restrict y to domain=0:20 to remove all y-values larger than 20, or (easier) just add ymax=25 to set the maximum value for the y-axis. The difference between the two is that the former removes all calculated y-values that are outside the given domain from the plot, while the ...


6

This works fine..... \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{tkz-euclide} \usepackage{pgfplots} \usetkzobj{all} \begin{document} \begin{center} \begin{tikzpicture} \begin{axis}% [ grid=major, x=5mm, y=5mm, xtick={-10,-9,...,10}, xmin=-10, xmax=10, xlabel={\tiny $x$}, axis x ...


6

You could give the xticks directly. The manual reveals that one can use the 1,3,...,19 writing style (as it is used in a foreach statement). A minimal example without data would be \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{pgfplots} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \begin{loglogaxis}[ log basis x = {2}, xtickten = {5,7,...,19}, ] ...


5

You can disable this behavior by the option scaled y ticks = false. % arara: pdflatex \documentclass[12pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{patterns} \usepackage{pgfplots} \pgfplotsset{compat=1.10} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \begin{axis}[% ybar=1.2pt, % configures `bar shift' width=0.80*\textwidth, height=7cm, ...


4

Grid lines go from the bottom of the coordinate system to the top, which is why the grid line go across the 2. There are other ways of drawing these lines though. To get the coordinate of the intersection between the two plot lines, you can use the features of the intersections library from TikZ. This is loaded by the fillbetween library, so it is not ...


3

The first problem, the strange Y characters can be considered to be a defect in pgfplots. In fact, it is the result of "premature optimization": pgfplots uses this format internally to represent floating point numbers in a normalized form - and it does not convert it back to IEEE numbers. Thinking about it, I believe that it should produce correct numbers. ...


3

There is no way to plot a function which is prepared for math typesetting. You will need to replicate the function by means of something like \pgfmathdeclarefunction{S}{1}{\valueP * (\alphaH + \valueZ * \alphaW) / (\valueP*(\alphaH + \valueZ * \alphaW) + \betaH + \valueZ * \betaW)} with \def\alphaH{4} \def\alphaW{5} ... you can also declare a function ...


3

I'll show you how to stack external files on top of one another in the manner you want, assuming you've got the ticks, axes labels and titles of the main square images in the external files. I used the file you linked in your comment for the bottom layer, and since there were no other ones (and the higher ones are different - no axes labels), I used some ...


2

I would say you can't because your interval is too small. See how the plot looks in wolfram alpha using small axis limits. https://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=-2%2F3+x%5E+3+%2B+x%5E2-3x%2B4%2F3+on+interval+0+to+0.5 Image generated from wolframalpha


2

PSTricks can help to analyze the graph. Because in the given interval 0 <= x <= 1/2 the function f(x)=(-2*x^3+3*x^2-9*x+4)/3 is almost identical to the line g(x)=(-8*x+4)/3 passing (0,f(0)) and (1/2,f(1/2)) as shown in the following figure. \documentclass[pstricks,border=24pt]{standalone} \usepackage{pst-plot} \def\f{(-2*x^3+3*x^2-9*x+4)/3} ...


1

You can use \tikzifexternalizing{<code for true>}{<code for false>} to make something different during the externalization: \documentclass{scrreprt} \usepackage{everypage} \usepackage{wallpaper} \usepackage{gnuplottex} \usepackage{pgfplots} \usetikzlibrary{pgfplots.polar} \usepgfplotslibrary{external} \tikzexternalize \begin{document} ...



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