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I found an answer, inspired from some work in www.parsitex.com While we replace the definition of the footnote by this one : \usepackage[para*]{manyfoot} \SetFootnoteHook{\setLTR} \DeclareNewFootnote[para]{B} \makeatletter \let\c@footnoteB\c@footnote \makeatother \let\Hfootnote\footnoteB \renewcommand{\thefootnoteB}{\roman{footnote}} and the same ...


3

You can make biblatex-chicago into thinking that the language is indeed british: \begin{filecontents}{\jobname.bib} @online{key1, title = {Stack Exchange}, url = {http://www.stackexchange.com}, urldate = {2014-09-16} } \end{filecontents} \documentclass{book} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{filecontents} \usepackage[style=british]{csquotes} ...


6

You can explicitly load the glossaries-polyglossia package to fix the problem: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setdefaultlanguage{german} \usepackage{siunitx} \usepackage[xindy]{glossaries} \usepackage{glossaries-polyglossia} \makeglossaries \newglossaryentry{a}{name = รค, description = A Umlaut} \begin{document} ...


5

The glossaries package will use translator if loaded for translating strings. The translator package requires that the language name is given as a global (class) option (which is usual babel 'best practice'). Unfortunately, polyglossia doesn't use this method as standard, but it will work happily. Try \documentclass[german]{article} ...



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