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The solution proposed above by @AlexG broke in early October 2014. In response to a request on the XeTeX list, @David Carlisle has offered a correction to the original code which solves the problem without resorting to a tricky kludge. The relevant section of code is replaced by the following: \begin{hebrew} \textenglish{\mediabutton[ ...


7

Probably your file is not saved in UTF-8 encoding. Apparently TeXshop allows you to put % !TEX encoding = UTF-8 Unicode as the first line, although since it's now the 21st Century you should probably make that the editor default. This can be done in the main preferences of TeXShop in the Source panel (Encoding). To summarize: Install polyglossia ...


0

There's a package for this, named translations, funnily enough. Thanks clemens for pointing me to Translation of words according to babel language .


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I gave an answer above yesterday. Through a new research of Polyglossia Package, I find out a new solution to Tibetan line-breaks. In fact, Polyglossia is supporting Tibetan now and I was totally misled by Tom who commented on this question. This is my example. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{eledmac} ...


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add \XeTeXlinebreaklocale "bo" after \begin{document} \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Microsoft Himalaya} \usepackage{microtype} \begin{document} \XeTeXlinebreaklocale "bo" །།འདིར་སྨྲས་པ། \begin{quotation} གལ་ཏེ་འདི་དག་ཀུན་སྟོང་ན། །འབྱུང་བ་མེད་ཅིང་འཇིག་པ་མེད།།གང་ཞིག་སྤང་དང་འགོག་པ་ལས། །མྱ་ངན་འདའ་བར་འགྱུར་བར་འདོད། \end{quotation} ...


4

Version 2 After reading a recommendation/comment by Khaled Hosny I've changed the core of the snippet, so it's switching font only when needed. There is no font change on purpose if a character is a space. In the previous version, it wrapped every single character (not recommended in general as it breaks up ligatures, kerning pairs and probably other ...


5

Loading a non existent language is useless. Just add a font family for Ethiopic characters (I used Kefa, use whatever you like). \documentclass[a4paper]{scrartcl} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage[Latin,Ethiopic]{ucharclasses} \setmainlanguage{english} \newfontfamily{\tigrinyafont}[Script=Ethiopic, Scale=1]{Kefa} ...


7

Just make \anw@true the same as \anw@false; I'll show a second level enumerate, with subcaptios it will be the same, as they use the Greek version of \alph as well. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{ifxetex} \ifxetex \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainfont{Old Standard} \setmainlanguage{greek} \else \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} ...


2

Fonts have nothing to do with the problem. There are several errors in gloss-hebrew.ldf and also in babel-hebrewalph.def, let's fix them: \documentclass[14pt,a4paper]{scrbook} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage[calendar=hebrew,numerals=hebrew]{hebrew} ...


4

This is perhaps (I wanted to be polite...) a bug in gloss-hebrew.ldf macro \hebrew@globalnumbers (if this is really a bug, there are others of the same type probably). Here is a fix. I used fonts available by default on my Mac OS X. \documentclass[14pt,a4paper]{scrbook} %\listfiles % for help in finding in the source of the bug \usepackage{fontspec} ...



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