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9

Like this? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \makebox[0pt][c]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{0}{flower}}% \makebox[0pt][c]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{22.5}{flower}}% \makebox[0pt][c]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{45}{flower}}% \makebox[0pt][c]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{67.5}{flower}}% \makebox[0pt][c]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{90}{flower}} ...


6

\begin{minipage}[t] sets the first line/top element to the base line. In your case its the image. However the images have different heights. An invisible top element helps, e.g. \vspace{0pt}: \begin{figure} \begin{minipage}[t]{2cm} \vspace{0pt} \includegraphics[width=2cm,angle=90]{test1} \end{minipage} \begin{minipage}[t]{2.5cm} \vspace{0pt} ...


4

You have to use \setlength instead of \renewcommand and also \dimexpr\paperheight-1cm\relax for the second question : \documentclass{article} \usepackage[absolute]{textpos} \setlength{\textwidth}{17cm} % (*) \begin{document} \begin{textblock*}{3cm}(1cm,\dimexpr\paperheight-1cm\relax) XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX \end{textblock*} \end{document}


4

forest is much better at optimising the placement of nodes. Here is a comparison of the tree your code produces (on the right) and a first-pass attempt to create the tree in forest: First Pass \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{forest} \usetikzlibrary{shapes.geometric} \begin{document} \pgfkeys{/forest, principal/.append style={rectangle, minimum ...


3

Here is an idea. I don't know if it could be applicable to your scenario, but if it is, it is the simplest one: do not use above nor below. Instead, let the node to be placed "over" the edges, and give it a white backround to hide part of the curve. I.e: \newcommand{\dual}{\draw (-2,-1) node[fill=white] {$X$} arc (180:0:2cm) node[fill=white] {$^*X$};} ...


3

sounds like marginpar, but if you want something that never floats (and will over-print if you put two on a line, then the second form) \documentclass{article} \reversemarginpar \newcommand\mystery[1]{\marginpar{\raggedleft #1}} \newcommand\mysteryb[1]{% ...


3

Do you mean like this? This achieved by putting the two items in a box the width of the line, placing the image first on the line with apparent zero width and the centering the author by adding equal amounts of glue on each side. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \begin{titlepage} \begin{center} \vspace*{1cm} ...


2

The anchor points are selected with the first and 3rd arguments to \stackinset. The 1st argument is the horizontal anchor, left, center, or right, while the 3rd argument is the vertical anchor, top, center, or bottom. The 2nd and 4th arguments provide offsets for the anchors if you don't want them precisely at the left, center, or right, etc. The anchor ...


2

You can use the adjustbox package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage[export]{adjustbox} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \includegraphics[width=2cm,angle=90,valign=T]{example-image.pdf} \includegraphics[width=2.5cm,angle=90,valign=T]{example-image-a.pdf} \includegraphics[width=2cm,valign=T]{example-image-b.pdf} \end{figure} ...


2

You may define your targets with xshift and yshift. Your blue frame is much easier drawn as a rectangle. % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{positioning,calc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \definecolor{myColor1}{named}{red} \definecolor{myColor2}{named}{blue} \definecolor{anti-flashwhite}{rgb}{0.95, 0.95, 0.96} ...


1

You can't use \begin{figure}...\end{figure} inside a minipage. See e.g., this question. I added the caption package and removed the figure environment. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper,x11names,landscape]{article} \usepackage{lipsum,mwe} \usepackage{caption} \usepackage{incgraph,graphicx} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} ...


1

I am not sure, what is the center of a page and and a box in this case and what about math, hence this is only a suggestion. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{url} \begin{document} \noindent\rule{\linewidth}{0.2pt} % only to show horizozontal centering \null\vfill \noindent\null\hfil\framebox[8cm][l]{\vbox{ \obeylines\obeyspaces Z. = ZZ[] $f = (x^3 - ...


1

This can handle up to 11 pictures per page. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphics,mwe} \makeatletter \newcounter{relative} \newcount\R@temp \newif\ifR@label \newif\ifR@loop \newcommand\new@relative[3]{% #1=label, #2=count, #3=page \expandafter\gdef\csname R@#1@count\endcsname{#2}% \expandafter\gdef\csname R@page#2\endcsname{#3}% }% ...


1

With tikz \documentclass{article} \pagestyle{empty}% for cropping \usepackage{tikz} \makeatletter \newcommand\rottext[4][center]{ \tikz[baseline=(X.base),every node/.style={inner sep=0pt}]{ \node (X) {#2}; \foreach \i in {1,...,#3} \node[rotate around={#4*\i:(X.#1)}] {#2}; } } \begin{document} Lorem ipsum ...


1

As mentioned in my comment, my answer at What are the ways to position things absolutely on the page? provides a way to do what you ask. I've modified the example to lay out images (instead of text) on my paper. If you don't know the size of the image in advance (which I pretend for the blue box), set it in a savebox, and use its measurements to guide the ...


1

Environment textblock has also an optional parameter that specifies the anchor point of the text block: [0,1] means, the left bottom corner. Then you do not need to know the height of the image: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[a6paper,hmargin=10mm,vmargin={10mm,20mm}]{geometry} \usepackage[absolute]{textpos} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{lipsum} ...


1

With the ruled option, the horizontal rules above/below the entire algorithm block is set with a height of \algoheightrule, while the rule between the caption and the algorithm is set with a height of \algotitleheightrule. Setting these to 0pt removes the rules, yet keeps the same ruled-like format: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[ruled]{algorithm2e} ...


1

If you read page 20 of the xcookybooky manual: The following command is needed, if more ingredients than preparation (steps) are inserted. In this case the wrapfigure package behaves in a strange way. The result is that the hint is also floating around the ingredients, although the "box" is already closed. This command repairs this effect. In ...


1

Meh... as it usually goes, as soon as I posted the question, I noticed that \path (axis cs:0,0), and I thought: "what would happen if I type rel" in there?" - and indeed, that fixes it; simply replace \path (axis cs:0,0) with: \path (rel axis cs:0,0) ... in the code above, and the plot will center as expected... It's still a brute force solution without ...


1

You could just add \hfil or \hfill (try what you like more) between your two figure. This will "push" the two images to the margins and put some blank space between them. Here is a version with minipage and one with subfigure from subcaption. If the \hfill is not possible for you, you should take a look on the command \subcaptionbox in the documentation ...


1

Since this question appears pretty high on search results, and this might be exactly something a SIGCHI template user may be looking for, here's an option that works on the SIGCHI template. (http://www.sigchi.org/publications/chipubform/sigchi-papers-latex-template/view) \teaser{ \centering \subfloat[Subfigure caption A\label{subfig:fig4a}]{ ...


1

On the advice of some of the comments I received, I took a proper look at whether simply doing something like \begin{figure}[!ht] would produce this desired effect. From experimenting with different floats and different positions. I am a little embarrassed to say that, yes, it seems like that is all that was needed after all. Maybe it won't suffice always ...



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