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1

Working example without the problem mentioned above, using explicit bounding box as recommended by @Andrew Swann; \documentclass[12pt]{standalone} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{gnuplot-lua-tikz} \usepackage[shell]{gnuplottex} \thispagestyle{empty} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \draw [draw=none,use as ...


6

It seems this should be possible using layers in pgfplots, but I couldn't figure it out. Here is a brute force solution in which you draw the back half separate from the front half by setting different limits for your y domain. \documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage{pgfplots} \pgfplotsset{width=7cm,compat=1.8} \begin{document} ...


1

Something like this. use of tikzpicture at the end. Here the proposal use reference point at (current page.center) then use shift={(x,y)} options, where x<0 and y<0 (3rd quadrant), to move the logo to the lower left corner. Of course, you could have use (current page.sout west) and use shift option with (x>0, y>0) to allocate the logo position. ...


1

Your tabular has the default [c] position so its baseline goes through its centre, which is why the centre of the table is aligned with the base of the image you want: \begin{tabular}[b] or more exactly as you are using tabular* : \begin{tabular*}[b]{0.43\textwidth}{llll} which will line the baseline of the bottom row (or \hline in this case) of the ...


3

First of all, you're missing a lot of TikZ libraries in your code, \usetikzlibrary{shapes.geometric,backgrounds,fit,arrows} The reason the two big coloured rectangles cover all the other nodes, is naturally because you've removed the [on background layer] option to the scope. Without that, they are just drawn on top of the previous stuff. In the code ...


3

Some how, I lost the mood of correcting your (non) MWE that is lacking lot of details. ( You guessed it right! I lost my mind ;-) Nevertheless, here is a MWE showing what you wanted to achieve: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{fit,backgrounds,positioning} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node (dm1) at (0,3) {Some}; ...


3

First we draw an invisible circle node that will guide us when placing B, C and D: \node (x) [circle,below right=6cm of id,minimum size=5.5cm,anchor=center]{}; The next step is to place BCD with respect to our x node using border anchors: \node (acquire) [stage,fill=white] at (x.135){B}; \node (assess) [stage,fill=white] at (x.45){C}; \node (persuade) ...


1

Try using the lscape and pdflscape packages (lscape is required by pdflscape). I'm not sure if you'll need to switch to single column first, if so, I'd do it before and after the landscape commands. Without a MWE from you I'm assuming you use multicols. Before the code below I'd put \end{multicols} and after the text below I'd restart the multiple columns ...


2

Next code shows another possibility for drawing parallel lines between nodes without using calc tikzlibrary. It uses (node.angle) syntax for starting points and |- or -| intersection coordinate for ending ones. If you want exact coordinates like 1/3 of node's vertical length you need calc library, but if you can accept something just visually good enough, ...


2

You can use the calc-library to set the connection-points for your lines. It's a simple approach which should be enough in the most situations. A small MWE: \documentclass[tikz, border=5mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node at (0,0) [draw, rectangle, minimum height=2cm, minimum width=.5cm] (mynode) {}; ...


4

this only allows p on odd pages. Note that it doesn't redefine \clearpage (including its implicit use in \end{document} so any floats pending at the end of the document will be flushed irrespective of page number. \documentclass{article} \makeatletter \def\@floatplacement{\global\@topnum\c@topnumber % Textpage bit, global: \global\@toproom ...


2

If you're in vertical mode, then \moveright2cm\vbox{\hrule .4\columnwidth}\nointerlineskip will do. Here's a Plain TeX simulation. \leftskip=2cm \moveright2cm\vbox{\hrule width 5cm}\nointerlineskip s \bigskip \hrule width 5cm s \bye Of course you'll have a strut after the rule and also some kerning (-3pt before and 2.6pt after the rule is what ...


4

From the user guide of the rotating package, which provides the environments sidewaysfigure and sidewaystable: If the twoside option has been given to the main document class (either explicitly, or implicitly as in the default for book class), the package will rotate sideways figures [and tables] according to the page number (this requires at least ...


0

One french people TeXuser send me a good solution. We have to: put the rule in a vbox put this vbox in a hbox, with a kern inside the hbox be certain than this hbox is followed by a \vbox AND NOT by a \hbox. See the three followings example \newbox\a \leftskip=2cm \setbox\a=\vbox{x} \footnoterule \unvbox\a % normal position position \newpage ...


2

Update: This seems to be what the OP really wants. Code \documentclass[]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{positioning} \tikzset{ pipe/.style = { draw, %top color=gray!60, %bottom color=gray!20, minimum width=4cm, minimum height=.1cm, anchor=east, }, source/.style = { draw, %top color=gray!60, ...


3

You may want to ask yourself if the captions really need to be so long. Captions usually work best if they're short and snappy. Might your readers be better off if you placed much of the text that's currently in the caption either in the body of the (sub)figure or in the main text itself? If you keep all captions nice and short, you won't need to agonize ...


0

When I look into the process generating footnotes, I found that LaTeX is doing everything in vertical mode. Therefore it is really difficult to find somewhere to insert a horizontal space. Finally I can only share this dirty trick: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \vspace*{17cm} \noindent text before \footnote{A good vertical distance} text ...


0

As you want to draw an arrow it is probably easiest to put everything inside a tikzpicture environment. Before I answer your question let me say that using \includegraphics[width=12cm,height=8cm]{Massesjj.pdf} to include your image is probably a mistake. It is better to specify either the height that you want, or the width, but not both as this may ...


2

There are many, many options for the placement of graph nodes. These are covered in-depth in Section 19.9 of the current (v3.0) pgfmanual. I assume your actual use case is more complex than this, so it's worth examining the options to choose the best one for your situation. But for this simple example, grow right sep=1cm should show the behavior you ...


5

For this kind of diagrams where you are putting many nodes relative to one another, a matrix approach would be more suited. You have to use \usetikzlibrary{matrix} and declare the nodes as the elements of a matrix. The row and column separations, node styles etc can be declared via \tikzset. You can refer to those nodes using the name of the matrix say (m) ...


4

Just to sum up the above comments and get future readers an overview about the discussed answers: Prerequisites: \usetikzlibrary{positioning} Per node distance definition: \node (id) [below left=<x-value> and <y-value> of <reference>] {<text>}; Global distance definition: \begin{tikzpicture}[node distance=<x-value> ...


2

You have to use the positioning-library of tikz to position nodes relative to each other. Try the follwing: \documentclass[tikz, border=5mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{calc, positioning} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node (p4) {$\hat{4}$}; \node[below=1cm of p4] (p3) {$3$}; \node[right=3cm of p4] (p1) {$\hat{1}$}; \node[below=1cm of p1] ...


2

You must: Add the positioning library. Use \pgfmathparse to calculate the 1/sqrt(2) expresion. Use \pgfmathresult where is the result of calculation. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc,positioning} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node (p4) {$\hat{4}$} ; \node[below=1cm of p4] (p3) {$3$} ; \node[right=3cm of p4] (p1) ...


0

Actually I think just embedding the label in the caption is sufficient: \caption{ \label{figure} Caption ...}


1

To reuse the macro name use \renewcommand the second time. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{algorithm2e} \usepackage[nopar]{lipsum} \begin{document} \null\vfill \lipsum[1-3] \newcommand{\InsertAlgorithmHere}{% \begin{algorithm}[tbp] \SetKwInOut{Input}{Input} \SetKwInOut{Output}{Output} \LinesNumbered \caption{Caption} \label{alg:Algo} \Input{-} ...



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