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1

Simply lower from 0.3\baselineskip: \documentclass{article}%[preprint2]{aastex} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand*{\img}[1]{% \raisebox{-.3\baselineskip}{% \includegraphics[ height=\baselineskip, width=\baselineskip, keepaspectratio, ]{#1}% }% } \begin{document} \begin{enumerate} \item When ready, click ...


6

Like this? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,calc} \newlength\myheight \newlength\mydepth \settototalheight\myheight{Xygp} \settodepth\mydepth{Xygp} \setlength\fboxsep{0pt} \begin{document} This is some arbitrary \raisebox{-\mydepth}{\fbox{\includegraphics[height=\myheight]{tiger}}} line of uninteresting text. \end{document} As written, ...


3

If I understand the requirements correctly, then I think the problem is that the TeX box that contains the tikzpicture has some non-zero depth. In the following, I use the local bounding box key to explicitly name the picture (using the current bounding box doesn't work) and then use the baseline key to set the baseline of the tikzpicture to the bottom of ...


7

You can play with the value of \arraycolsep, or use the medmath command, from nccmath, which sets the fontsize to ~ 80% of \displaystyle. You also can combine both solutions: \documentclass[a4paper, 11pt]{book} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[showframe, nomarginpar]{geometry} \usepackage{mathtools, nccmath} \begin{document} \[ ...


0

Thanks Herbert. I was using your answer, then I found: \fancyfoot[L]{\scriptsize \hskip 0pt plus .25 fill Research Strategy \hskip 0pt plus .5 fill Page \thepage\hskip 0pt plus .25 fill } Which is slightly more complicated but it allows you to adjust the amount of space in each open space.


5

\usepackage{fancyhdr} \pagestyle{fancy} \fancyhf{} \lfoot{\hfill Specific Arms \hfill Page \thepage\hfill} or \lfoot{\makebox[0.5\linewidth]{Specific Arms}\makebox[0.5\linewidth]{Page \thepage}}


1

Here is a solution with floatrow: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{etoolbox} \usepackage{caption, floatrow} \DeclareFloatVCode{interrowsep}{\vskip 5ex} \DeclareFloatVCode{bottomrowsep}{} \captionsetup{labelfont = sc} \begin{document} \lipsum[2] \begin{figure}[!htbp] ...


1

The problem is essentially independent of pgfplots as @percusse pointed out in his comment: the graphics are too large to fit into your horizontal space and so TeX breaks the line. I see that your question is actually more than its title: you have three \captions in your figure although figure supports just one. This indicates that my answer might not fit ...


1

The in January released 2.0 version of minted allows you to use the newfloat-package instead of the (rather old) float-package. If you want to use newfloat, the method for positioning the caption above the source is not the same as Jonas's but rather the following. \documentclass[a4paper]{scrartcl} \usepackage{caption} \usepackage[newfloat]{minted} ...


3

I used 2 \parboxes to insert side-by-side. \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{graphicx} % Allows including images \usepackage{booktabs} % Allows the use of \toprule, \midrule and \bottomrule in tables \usepackage{comment} \usepackage{listings} \usepackage{hyperref,xcolor} \usepackage{empheq} \newcommand*\widefbox[1]{\fbox{\hspace{2em}#1\hspace{2em}}} ...


0

The \foreach loop is fantastic tool, but has the particularity to create and run inside a group. So every action (\def, \clip, ...) that is limited by the scope will not survive outside the loop. In some situation it is good to know that there are other loops that don't run in a group. For example the xint bundle has such loops. Here is one example : ...


3

The simplest method for arranging material in rows and columns is with tabular, in this case nested ones. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \centering \begin{tabular}{@{}cc@{}}% outer tabular \begin{tabular}{@{}c@{}}% inner tabular for the big picture \includegraphics[height=3cm,width=4cm]{duck} ...


2

You could place the rectangle in one minipage and the six squares in another. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[demo]{graphicx} % remove 'demo' option in real document \begin{document} \begin{figure} \centering \begin{minipage}{2.5cm} \includegraphics[width=2.5cm,height=1cm]{rectangle} \end{minipage} % note: no line break after end of minipage ...


4

Yes, this is possible. You can use layers to place the elements in the desired order. I initially used \pgfdeclarelayer and \pgfsetlayers but, as percusse mentions in his comment, pgfplots offers set layers which gives a set of predefined layers that can be used to place elements: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{pgfplots} ...


5

As David has commented in his answer, you need a minipage. If you switch to tcolorbox, you can do this in a simpler (and shorter) way using the capture key which allows you to capture the box in a different number of ways, including a minipage. A little example reproducing your box: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[many]{tcolorbox} ...


5

You need to wrap it in a vertical box such as minipage: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[framemethod=pgf]{mdframed} \newmdenv[% innerlinewidth=2pt,% roundcorner=10pt,% linecolor=black,% backgroundcolor=white,% skipabove=.5\baselineskip,skipbelow=.5\baselineskip,% ...


4

Everything is still working fine, but you had a space after the colon in pic cs: a. Get rid of this and the white space between This \tikz[... which introduces unneeded space here and you are ready to go. % arara: pdflatex % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{tikzmark} \begin{document} \[ \tikzmark{a} e^{i\pi/2} = i ...


1

This works perfect as long as your text doesn't get too long. \documentclass[tikz, border=6mm]{standalone} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[x=1mm, y=1mm] \coordinate[](0_r1) at (0,22.5); \coordinate[](0_r2) at (0,42); \coordinate[](0_r3) at (0,49); \coordinate[](b1_r2) at (14.4,42); \coordinate[](b1_r3) at (14.4,49); ...


2

This is a known issue, and it has been treated before1 but it could be a problem in the code for the fit library.2 However you can use the solution found in one of those questions and use the label instead. I also think it's easier if you create a new command for placing your nodes which reduces 3 lines of code for one node, to one line of code, using the ...


5

Another way to do this (maybe this option wasn't present before) is by setting the refline=dateleft option, either as a documentclass option, or in the preamble like this: \KOMAoptions{refline=dateleft} This aligns both the city and the date to the left.


1

Here is a way to do it (I first show it with 4 figures, and later in the answer, with 2). It requires some work, but at least one does not have to manually calculate the widths of minipages. In my MWE, I show more than is needed, just for explanation purposes. I show my 4 figures (\figa through \figd) as simple \rule boxes of different colors. I then use ...


1

Here's another approach using the calc library and the let syntax. First the widths for the two nodes to the left is measured (the nodes are not typeset yet at this point) and the maximum is chosen to be the common width (there's no need here to predefine the width for the first node, as in the other answer); then the nodes are typeset one below the other ...


4

This is done by setting the width of the first node, and then fitting the other two nodes to the previous nodes, using the fit library. Same as #1. Solved with #1. This depends on what you want to do. If you only want two short nodes inside of the yellow, you can add two more nodes anchored there. But it depends on what you want to do Output Code ...


4

The problem with your code is that you had braces and not brackets for the tikzpicture options, so they were ignored: \documentclass{beamer} % \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{verbatim} \usetikzlibrary{arrows,shapes,backgrounds,positioning} \begin{document} \tikzstyle{every picture}+=[remember picture] \tikzstyle{na} = [baseline=-.5ex] \begin{frame} ...


0

Do you want this? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand\Item[1][]{% \ifx\relax#1\relax \item \else \item[#1] \fi \abovedisplayskip=0pt\abovedisplayshortskip=0pt~\vspace*{-\baselineskip}} \begin{document} \begin{enumerate} \item \begin{enumerate} \Item \begin{align*} A \cap (B \cup C) & = x \in A \cap ...


1

The position of the label is calculated through the auto option. It is designed to make labels floating alongside the curve without overlapping. As a result the pin-edge is nearly orthogonal to the tangent line for safety. It is not difficult to override auto but it may ruin the whole engine. A workaround is to use the temporary point (label visualizer ...



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