Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

This requires the makeindex style file to be changed/extended. For example, a dashindex.ist can be defined to be item_1 "\n \\subitem -- , " item_x1 "\n \\subitem -- , " saying, that the sub levels should be preceeded by a dash and a comma. Calling flow: pdflatex foo makeindex -s dashindex.ist foo pdflatex foo ...


4

To enable the TeX-Shortcuts, setting the fonts should look like this: \usepackage{fontspec} \defaultfontfeatures{Ligatures=TeX} \setmainfont{Linux Libertine} To your preamble.


3

This period is hard coded into boxhandler.sty. For me, this would be sufficient reason not to use this package. You coild edit that file and make changes to six of the internal caption commands: \offset@caption \nooffset@caption \shortleft@caption \shortcenter@caption \shortright@caption \new@makecaption Remove the period after #2 in each of their ...


2

I find this way is very convenient: package: \usepackage[frenchb]{babel} in text: \og text \fg{}


2

Punctuation spacing style is configurable. And there are 6 predefined styles in xeCJK: quanjiao, banjiao, kaiming, hangmobanjiao, CCT and plain. What you need is the plain style, which does not change the original width of punctuations. If you can read Chinese, you should read the package document of xeCJK first. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} ...


2

You could try something like this. But I didn't check carefully if it does the expected thing with the other quoting commands. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[american]{babel} \usepackage[autostyle,autopunct=true]{csquotes} \listfiles \begin{document} \renewcommand{\mktextquote}[6]{% #1#2\ifblank{#4}{#5}{#4}#3#6} \let\enquote\textquote ...


2

When dealing with quotes the csquotes package is most convenient. Then you won’t have to use \glqq and \grqq at all. The basic usage would be: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{csquotes} \begin{document} \enquote{\textit{Analysis II}} \end{document} Of course you can make your italic quotes into a custom macro with ...


1

Would this be what you seek? Idea inspired from here Code \documentclass[border=10pt,varwidth]{standalone}%[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{xeCJK} \setCJKmainfont{標楷體} \XeTeXlinebreaklocale "zh" \XeTeXlinebreakskip = 0pt plus 1pt \makeatletter \newcommand\myc{\@ifnextchar:{「}{:\@}} \newcommand\myp{\@ifnextchar。{」}{。\@}} ...


1

Use the csquotes package! It also offers great possibilieties to cope with the different quoting styles of the various languages (babel and polyglossia are supported) \documentclass[parskip=half]{scrartcl} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage{english} \setotherlanguages{german} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Deja Vu Sans} ...


1

The correct way for dealing with consecutive quotes is separating them with a thin space: ``He said it was `off the hook'\,'' Here's a sample, where various inputs are compared: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{@{}ll@{}} Input & Rendering \\ \verb|``He said it was `off the hook'''| & ``He said it was `off the hook''' \\ ...


1

Even though it's already been mentioned in the posting, it's worth discussing the dcolumn package in more detail. The package provides a column type called D that performs alignment on the decimal marker. The D column type takes three inputs: the input decimal marker (usually . or ,), the output decimal marker (again, usually . or ,), and the number of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible