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12

This is a solution: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{letltxmacro} \LetLtxMacro{\oldtexttt}{\texttt} \def\oldapostrophe{'} \catcode`\'=\active \makeatletter \def\active@text@prime{\oldapostrophe} % this trick was done by egreg in another answer of mine \def\pr@m@s{% \ifx'\@let@token \expandafter\pr@@@s \else \ifx^\@let@token ...


7

This is a misunderstanding: LaTeX doesn't help you to write your text, which is the job of the editor. I'm quite confident that such a thing (capitalize each first letter after a dot) can be achieved with emacs or vim. Word is all and everything in one: editor, typesetting machine, spreadsheet and so on and does nothing really well (OK, millions of people ...


6

A streamlined version of karlkoeller's solution: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{textcomp,upquote} \usepackage{regexpatch} \makeatletter \def\active@text@prime{\ifin@texttt\textquotesingle\else'\fi} \def\active@math@prime{^\bgroup\prim@s} \newif\ifin@texttt \regexpatchcmd{\pr@m@s}{\'}{\cA\'}{}{} \xapptocmd{\ttfamily}{\in@texttttrue}{}{} ...


4

Just comment the line \swapnumbers and use \newtheoremstyle{mystyle} {\baselineskip}{\baselineskip}{\itshape}{}{}{\vspace{\baselineskip}}{\newline} {\thmnumber{#2}.\thmname{ #1}\thmnote{ #3}} MWE \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsthm} %\swapnumbers \newlength{\spacelength} \settowidth{\spacelength}{\normalfont\ } \newtheoremstyle{mystyle} ...


4

(Copied here from my comments, with some additions.) LyX automatically escapes things before passing them to LaTeX. For example, – is replaced by \textendash, $ is replaced by \$, and indeed " is replaced by \textquotedbl. LyX also takes care of which packages to load and encoding to use (but isn't perfect). So the concern here is not which macro to use ...


3

Here you are: patching journal+issuetitle: \begin{filecontents}{my-bib.bib} @article{Lubbers.2002, author = {Lubbers, Marcel and Gijsberts, M{\'e}rove and Scheepers, Peer}, year = {2002}, title = {{E}xtreme {R}ight-{W}ing {V}oting in {W}estern {E}urope}, pages = {345--378}, volume = {41}, number = {3}, issn = {03044130}, journal = {European Journal ...


3

You could use the macro \textquotedbl, which requires loading the fontenc package with an option such as T1. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \begin{document} \textquotedbl this\textquotedbl \end{document}


3

Without dealing with external programs, LaTeX code or shortcuts of Preferences menu: Method 1: From menu Menu Insert > Special character > Symbol > Category Basic Latin > " > Apply Method 2: Copy from math mode Ctrl+M (math mode) ⇧ Shift+2 (type " in math mode, i.e.: $"$) ⇧ Shift + <- (select ") Ctrl + C (copy ") → → (out of math mode) ...


2

Not a solution, but a longer comment: For some people, automatic capitalization of some word processors is a "bug", not a "feature". As pointed Gonzalo Medina. The reason is that in practice there are many exceptions, and supervise/correct every automatic decision is very distracting. In my case, overall I hate write correctly abbreviated name species ...


2

You can use the textcmds package which has the \ldq and \rdq commands for the double quotes, and simpler \qq{...} for double quoting some text: \documentclass{book} \usepackage[OT1,T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[british,french]{babel} \usepackage[kerning=true]{microtype} \usepackage{textcmds} \SetExtraKerning[ unit = space ]{ ...


2

The reason why \renewcommand{\labelnamepunct}{\addspace} does not work is because \labelnamepunct is the separator between the year (or "author-year") in the chosen style and the title. However, in the standard driver for online there are several \newunit before the note is printed. \nounit (or better \newunitpunct is the separator before note. A "proper" ...


2

For single straight quotes, use Ctrl+'; for double straight quotes use Ctrl+".


1

Actually you can capitalize the beginning of a new sentence by making . active and redfine it to first test if a space is following the period and then executing \ucmacro (a macro version of the \uppercase primitive) when a space was found and to print whatever was found when it wasn't a space: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \let\period=. ...



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