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4

@topskip: Start using ConTeXt again! Other TeX ligatures (-- and ---) are enabled by default, quotes are not! \setupbodyfont[dejavu] \starttext "Heading" \stoptext


6

With the new luaotfload syntax for the definition of extra font features (from v2.7 on, I guess). Basically, we condone ligaturing the " to ”, but then have a font feature which substitutes ” back to ". It might also be possible to hook into the ligaturing callback to prevent this particular ligature. Disclaimer: I have no idea what I'm doing. \...


3

You want to disable the automatic Ligatures=TeX feature: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \defaultfontfeatures[\rmfamily]{} \setmainfont{DejaVu Serif} \begin{document} "Heading" \end{document}


2

There is no such thing as a ”decimal separator”. What you're seeing are different shapes for the plain comma. The first picture has text in Latin Modern, as you requested. The second picture has text in Palatino. The two fonts have different shapes for the comma and there's nothing particular about this. Do \usepackage{mathpazo} instead of \usepackage{...


4

Maybe you are using package siunitx. There both the comma and the period can be used as input decimal markers (see option input-decimal-markers). The decimal marker for the output is configured by output-decimal-marker, the default is the period and can be changed to a comma: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{siunitx} \sisetup{output-decimal-marker={,}} \...


2

TexStudio provides a better method to covert your text into LaTeX directly by going to Idefix->Paste as Latex / Covert to Latex or if your are writing in the TexStudio itself then please go the options Options->Configure TexStudio -> Editor ->Replace Double Quotes -> Select English quote After pressing OK, whenever you write a double quote in ...


0

You can simply use brackets around one of your < or > symbol to avoid merging it with the second one. For example <{<}My text{>}>.


1

You can use LanguageTool in TeXstudio. If you really need it, consider to switch.


3

Here is a simple solution with pstricks: \documentclass[x11names]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{boldline} \usepackage{pst-node, multido} \usepackage{auto-pst-pdf} \newcommand\tleft[1]{\pnode[-1.2ex, 2.5ex]{t#1}} \newcommand\bright[1]{\pnode[1.2ex, -1.2ex]{b#1}} \begin{document} \[ % \begin{...


4

With a TiKZ matrix is not difficult to do it: \documentclass[tikz,border=2mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{matrix,backgrounds,patterns} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \matrix (A) [matrix of nodes, column sep=1mm, row sep=1mm] { 0 & 1 & 1 & 0 & 1 & 1 & 0 & 1 \\ 1 & 0 & 0 & 1 & 0 & 0 & 1 & 1 \\ 1 &...


3

You can use combination of a font switch the character spacing to change the appearance of the em-dash. In the first step you create a separate typeface with a compressed em-dash. \definefontfeature[russian][extend=0.8] \definefallbackfamily [russianfont] [rm] [DejaVu Serif] [range={0x2013,0x2014},force=yes,features=russian] \definefontfamily [...


2

This also removes the burden of typing different em-dashes for different situations. You just type --- or — (unicode em-dash) and it will adjust depending of the position. \usemodule[translate] \translateinput[---][—] \define\cyrdashsymbol{\dontleavehmode\scale[sx=0.80]{---}} % cyrillic dash sign \unexpanded\def\cyrdash{\ifincsname\string—\else \ifvmode\...


3

One option is to have language specific hspace: \define\cyrdash{\dontleavehmode\scale[sx=0.80]{---}} \setuplanguage [ru] [midsentence=\cyrdash, leftsentence=\cyrdash, rightsentence=\cyrdash] \definehspace [emdash] [\zeropoint] \definehspace [ru] [emdash] [2cm] % Exaggerated, for visualization. \definetextmodediscretionary < {\...


5

This ought to be a kern, rather than a skip; no line break can happen at a kern, unless it is followed by a discardable item (such as a skip). \documentclass[nobib]{tufte-book} % Macros for typesetting the documentation \newcommand{\hairsp}{\leavevmode\kern1pt }% hair space \newcommand{\ie}{\textit{i.\hairsp e.\@}} \newcommand{\eg}{\textit{e.\hairsp g.\@}} ...


4

there are probably better ways to do this, but if you put \nolinebreak before the \hspace in the definition of \hairsp that will prevent a break any time the macro is used. \newcommand{\hairsp}{\nolinebreak\hspace{1pt}}% hair space


3

And of course you can just use pgfplots (with some tweaks to match the visual output): \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{pgfplots} \pgfplotsset{compat=1.13} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \begin{axis}[xbar, xmin=0,xmax=10, symbolic y coords={xxx,yyy}, ytick=data, nodes near coords, nodes near coords align={horizontal}, axis lines = left, xtick={...


5

The bchart package is not very flexible and, unfortunately, doesn't even use pgfkeys. But you can use percusse's idea of using PGFmath's number printing by creating your own \Bcbar macro: \newcommand*\Bcbar[2][] {\bcbar[{value={\pgfmathprintnumber[my value style/.try]{#2}}, #1}]{#2}} \pgfset{number format/my value style/.style={use comma}} This uses the ...


3

I just changed one line in one macro, but unfortunately that's almost the entire package. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{bchart} \makeatletter \renewenvironment{bchart}[1][]{% % Bars: \newcommand{\bcbar}[2][]{ % Set defaults: \renewcommand{\bcbarcolor}{blue!20} \renewcommand{\bcbartext}{} \renewcommand{\bcbarlabel}{} \...



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