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7

You can use the fraction-function key of siunitx. \tfrac is provided by amsmath. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{siunitx} \sisetup{ per-mode=fraction, fraction-function=\tfrac } \begin{document} $\SI{1}{\metre\per\second}$ $\displaystyle \SI{1}{\metre\per\second}$ \end{document}


7

The S column type is meant to take inputs in the same format as the single mandatory argument to siunitx's \num{} command. Anything else is interpreted as text (for headings, etc.) and is centered about the decimal point location. This is why you see the overall centering behavior: The \SI{}{} is interpreted as something that is "not a number" and is ...


5

In case if you have to use different units for different numbers, you have these possibilities with table-space-text-post and table-align-text-post: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{siunitx} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{S[table-format=1.6,table-space-text-post = \si{\meter}]} {Measured Values} \\ 0.0031\si{\meter} \\ ...


5

You are padding too much data in the table. Anyway, here is an attempt. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{booktabs,multirow} \usepackage{siunitx} \sisetup{detect-mode, group-digits = false, input-symbols = ( ) } \newcommand{\level}[1]{% \multirow{2}{*}{% \begin{tabular}{@{}>{\raggedright\arraybackslash}p{0.2\textwidth}@{}} ...


4

The siunitx package loads array, part of the standard tools bundle for LaTeX (this is needed to allow the S and s column types to work). However, both array and arydshln make changes to the standard tabular mechanism and I suspect do no tests for other redefinitions. Thus you need to load array before arydshln: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{array} ...


4

Just set open-bracket or close-bracket: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{siunitx} \begin{document} \SIrange[range-units = brackets,open-bracket = {[}]{2}{4}{\degreeCelsius} \end{document}


3

You can use \begin{tabular}{lSSS[explicit-sign=+]} .... BTW: non-numerical input in S-type columns should be escaped by putting the material in braces: {\textbf{before}}. Also: since you're using siunitx already you should use it for the units as well. In my example below I also use booktabs for nicer table rules. \documentclass{article} ...


2

Unless I'm missing something important, I don't see the point in creating three separate tabular* environments, each encased in a subtable environment, for the matter at hand. If you really need to assure consistent column widths across the three subparts, the easiest method by far is to create just one tabular* (or tabular, or whatever) environment. Losing ...


2

Here's a solution that uses the dcolumn package and its d column type instead of the siunitx package and its S column type. The main advantage I see to using the dcolumn package is that it simplifies setting the single, double and triple asterisks in superscript position; doing so is not only stylistically pleasant but also serves to economize on much-needed ...


2

If you are unable to use a different symbol than \times to represent multiplication, you should consider using scientific E or e notation (I think little e is easier to read): To enable this you can set output-exponent-marker = \ensuremath{\mathrm{E}} or output-exponent-marker = \text{e} if you prefer big E or little e notation respectively, either inline ...


1

It is enough to write {+}. I took the opportunity to load booktabsto improve the look of horizontal rules, defining a \doubletoprule and a doublebottomrule commands. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{siunitx} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{nccmath} \usepackage{booktabs} \newcommand\doubletoprule{% \toprule ...



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