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8

Yes, you can get one. As siunitx is clever it squares the unit itself, so you have to give just one mm without any power. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{siunitx} \begin{document} \SI[product-units=power]{5 x 5}{\mm} \end{document}


7

This gets described on page 12 of the siunitx manual: New units are produced using the \DeclareSIUnit macro. < symbol > can contain literal input, other units, multiple prefixes, powers and \per, although literal text should not be intermixed with unit macros. Units can be created with < options > from the usual list understood by siunitx, ...


5

Use a tabular, with \left[ and \right]: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[spanish,es-noshorthands]{babel} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{mathptmx} \usepackage{siunitx} \sisetup{per-mode = symbol} \begin{document} \begin{equation*} \left[ \begin{tabular}{ @{} S[table-format=-4....


5

Here are some improvements to your table: you don't need an empty column to have distinct \clines if you replace them with \cmidrules and crop them on both sides. Also, as daleif pointed, the first column can to be left-aligned rather than S type. You have three different number formats for your S columns, and it's better to differentiate them. Last, don't ...


4

This is a common problem with pgfplots (or tikz in general), that you cannot round numbers prior to printing them. But here we need to fully-expandably round the numbers, which can be done with l3fp. I declared the macro \round[<precision>]{<expression>} which rounds expression to precision decimal digits. The precision argument is optional ...


3

The S-columntype is from siunitx, which you of course already know. It tries to parse the numbers it finds in every cell. So when it finds some text, as in your toprow, it tries to parse that too. Solve this by placing curlybraces{} around each and one of the headertexts. Note that siunitx is semi-smart about this, so only those that could be mistaken for a ...


3

You could use table-space-text-pos and the < column specification. For some reason, the last column acts up with S and < which seems to be related with the problems in ctable and siunitx: Last column does not center correctly (possible incompatibility?). I have found that adding another column at the end helps, see also Peter Grill's comment. If you ...


3

How about using the siunitx - columns in table and wrap the bmatrix around? Please choose the appropiate S settings for your needs. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[spanish,es-noshorthands]{babel} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{mathptmx} \usepackage{siunitx} \sisetup{per-mode = symbol}...


3

I recently emailed APS regarding this question. They said that it is acceptable to use the siunitx package.


3

Here are two ways of writing them. The first one is more flexible, in that it sets a default output of millimetres, which could be changed by an optional parameter. The second one, is more simple, but it is also the only way I have ever seen it written in textbooks. As for the confusing writing in countries where the decimal marker is a comma, in most books ...


1

The reason you're getting a "missing $ inserted" error message is that siunitx doesn't manage to parse the terms $\dot{W}^{M1}$ and $\dot{W}^{M2}$ correctly. As they're written, these terms satisfy LaTeX's own syntax rules for math formulas. See the following paragraph for a modification that helps out the siunitx parser. One solution is to enclose the ...



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