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Here I use \scalerel* to make a ( as big as a \strut (any bigger and it will affect line spacing). \documentclass{article} \usepackage{scalerel,nicefrac} \begin{document} \scalerel*{(}{\strut}and there is open ball $B(x,\nicefrac{1}{i})$\scalerel{)}{\strut} \end{document} If one prefers a stretched rather than scaled version, just use \stretchrel ...


4

You could use the \big-related stretching for brackets: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{nicefrac} \newcommand{\textbiglparen}{$\bigl($} \newcommand{\textbigrparen}{$\bigr)$} \setlength{\parindent}{0pt}% Just for this example \begin{document} Here is some text (and there is open ball $B(x,\nicefrac{1}{i})$). \par Here is some text \textbiglparen{}and ...


3

The font definition file for the sans serif version of the tipa fonts assumes they are not scalable, but in modern TeX distributions they are. So just tell LaTeX so. \documentclass[final]{beamer} \mode<presentation> { \usetheme{Berlin} } \usepackage[orientation=portrait,size=a0,scale=1.4,debug] {beamerposter} % e.g. for ...


2

Alan Munn suggested using a Unicode font, and since there are a few tricks to it, here’s how. You get a lot of other bonuses this way, such as being able to enter Unicode source and copy IPA from the file correctly. \documentclass[final]{beamer} \mode<presentation> { } \usetheme{Berlin} \usepackage[orientation=portrait,size=a0,scale=1.4,debug] ...


2

You could use something like node[transformer core,yscale=2] (T) or node[transformer core,yscale=2,transform shape] (T) However, instead of scaling the transformer, I'd suggest you another approach: \documentclass[11pt]{article} \usepackage[margin=1in]{geometry} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage[english]{babel} ...



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