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14

There is no difference. Let's look at how the output is constructed by adding \showoutput and checking the .log when compiling the following minimal example: \documentclass{article} \pagestyle{empty}% To avoid page numbers in the output \showoutput% Show how the output is constructed \begin{document} $xy=1$ $x y = 1$ \end{document} This is extracted from ...


12

There is no difference between $xy=1$ and $x y = 1$ or $ x y = 1 $. They are rendered the same exactly: The spacing depends on the classification into math atoms: $ \mathord{x} \mathord{y} \mathrel{=} \mathord{1} $ Spacing: There is not spacing at the begin or end of the formula except for \mathsurround, which is usually 0 pt. No space between ...


8

At the beginning of each tikzpicture, TikZ selects nullfont and sets \spaceskip to zero. Then, in each node content, TikZ resets \spaceskip to .3333em. Here is a solution: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \spaceskip 2ex \tikzset{every node/.style={execute at begin node={\spaceskip 2ex}}} \begin{document} \noindent a b c\\ \tikz{% \node ...


8

LaTeX is so not designed for this kind of document. But if you must, must. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \setlength\unitlength{1cm} \vspace*{\fill} \noindent \begin{picture}(0,0)\bfseries\large \put(4,3){\includegraphics{house}} \put(0.5,5){\parbox{5cm}{\raggedright If you are feeling generous I'd like a house, ...


5

I'd probably use array for this but in any case the same \extrarowheight parameter can be used: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{tabu} \begin{document} a \[ \begin{tabu} {c | c c c c c c} \firsthline f & a_{11} & a_{12} & a_{21} & a_{22} & b_1 & b_2 \\ \hline 1 & a_{11}^1 & a_{12}^1 & ...


5

The following is taken directly from Knuth's TeXbook (Chapter 3: Controlling TeX, p 8): When a space comes after a control word (an all-letter control sequence), it is ignored by TeX; i.e., it is not considered to be a "real" space belonging to the manuscript that is being typeset. But when a space comes after a control symbol, it's truly a space. ...


5

There are not many uses for it besides after control sequences or to ensure non extended spaces after periods that are not punctuation (but in these cases, a tie ~ would be better). The tie is defined in terms of \ : in Plain TeX it is \def~{\penalty\@M \ } % tie while in LaTeX we see \def~{\nobreakspace{}} ...


5

How about the following: \documentclass{beamer} \begin{document} \frame{ \begin{itemize} \item one \item two \newline \item three \end{itemize} } \end{document}


5

You add vertical space in the same way you'd do outside itemize; it's not very clear why you'd do it in the first place. The following code works also with beamer. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{itemize} \item one \item two \bigskip \item three \end{itemize} \end{document}


5

I would suggest using enumitem to create list to suit your needs: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{enumitem} \newlist{noitemize}{itemize}{1} \setlist[noitemize]{label={}, labelsep=0pt, leftmargin=0pt} \begin{document} \noindent Some reference text. \begin{itemize} \item foo \item[] bar \end{itemize} \begin{itemize}[label={}] \item foo ...


4

One non-tabular approach using the tabto package: \documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{scrreprt} \usepackage{tabto} \parindent0pt \parskip.5em \begin{document} \NumTabs{3} \noindent {\bfseries Book title} \tab{\bfseries Author's name} \tab{2010} This book is about some guy who wrote a book because he felt like a book would be a good thing to write.....etc etc ...


4

Expanding on my comment: acro's options regarding formatting accept code whose last macro may need a mandatory argument (if this shouldn't work for a formatting option I'd consider this an error on my part and would appreciate a message!). The contents of said argument will be the corresponding entry. So I would recommend using \DeclareAcronym{aureus}{ ...


4

You need to alter the value of \labelsep for the list. The default is 0.5em. This changes that to 1.5em: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{regexpatch} \usepackage{algpseudocode} \makeatletter \xpatchcmd{\algorithmic}{\labelsep 0.5em}{\labelsep 1.5em}{\typeout{Success!}}{\typeout{Oh dear!}} \makeatother \begin{document} \begin{algorithmic}[1] \State ...


2

Use it this way: \documentclass[a4paper]{scrartcl} \usepackage[absolute]{pst-abspos} \begin{document} \section{one} \pstPutAbs(5,-5){Hi} \newpage \section{two} \pstPutAbs(6,-5){Hi} \end{document} With [absolute] it is internally already set at the beginning of the first page. And with \newpage it is set on the following page.


2

A simple solution is to wrap the two proof trees in a minipage each. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{bussproofs} \begin{document} \begin{minipage}{.45\textwidth} \begin{prooftree} \AxiomC{$\Gamma\vdash B $} \RightLabel{K} \UnaryInfC{$\Gamma,A\vdash B $} \end{prooftree} \end{minipage} \begin{minipage}{.45\textwidth} \begin{prooftree} ...


1

You can define a bprooftree (boxed proof tree) that encloses the proof tree in a box as wide as the tree. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{bussproofs} \usepackage{lipsum} % just for the example \newenvironment{bprooftree} {\leavevmode\hbox\bgroup} {\DisplayProof\egroup} \begin{document} \lipsum*[2] \[ \begin{bprooftree} \AxiomC{$\Gamma\vdash B $} ...


1

prooftree is designed to set a proof in a centred, display environment, with appropriate vertical spacing. You don't want that so don't use the environment. Instead, use \DisplayProof to display the proofs in-line. This can be used to set proofs within text or side-by-side. I've used a regular center environment to display the two proofs centred and with ...


1

I have used the following which puts x -> y under the limit. \lim\limit_{x \to y}


1

You can use \makebox to specify the width of the blocks. As the other answer shows, are other box commands that will give you other options like text wrapping (see texdoc lshort). If you want the date flush right you can just put an \hfill before it. This will all be simpler to write if you define a macro that spaces and formats your headers so that you can ...


1

As cgnieder correctly commented: Using long-format=\textit instead of long-format=\itshape does the trick.



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