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1

Would you use the unicode em-dash? In that case you can use some magic. Any line starting with — (the unicode em-dash) would take the next paragraph as argument and put it in italics (or any format you want). \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[polish]{babel} ...


4

Put one extra pair of braces around the arrow. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stmaryrd,xspace} \newcommand{\deref}{\ensuremath{{\rightarrowtriangle}}\xspace} \begin{document} $b\deref\mathbf{r}_S$ \end{document} BTW, what is the intention of using ensuremath and \xspace here? It is better not to use them.


0

Thanks to all ideas given above, here's the easiest thing to do: Just put \kern 0.33em behind every "opening" dash (every other solution demands some editing throughout the document anyway). \textit{---\kern 0.33em Jaki jest język wietnamski?} \\ \textit{---\kern 0.33em Język wietnamski nie jest trudny.} \\ This produces: However to change the width, all ...


8

Put this in the preamble \newcommand{\opendialog}{---\enspace} \newcommand{\dialog}[1]{\opendialog\textit{#1}} and, in the document, \dialog{To be or not to be, that is the question} Full example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[polish]{babel} \newcommand{\opendialog}{---\enspace} ...


3

I'd use some simple macro such as \def\fs{\kern 0.33em}: \textit{---\fs Jaki jest język wietnamski?} \\ \textit{---\fs Język wietnamski nie jest trudny.} \\


1

load babel with your language in order to get the right hyphenations load microtype which fixes many of those problems put the dialogue in a group and put \RaggedRight in it. This will flush everything to the left. I would recommend to write a command or environment for this. % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} ...


4

You can lower that subscript by a little by adding an invisible rule via \mystrut: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \newcommand{\mystrut}{\rule{0pt}{1.6ex}} %% <-- adjust this \begin{document} \[ \lim_{\mathclap{(x,y)\rightarrow (0,0)\mystrut}} f(x,y) \] \end{document}


0

I have no real idea what you are trying to do or what the code fragments are intended to achieve. But perhaps this will help somewhat. Here is some annotated code which is closer, at least, to being minimal. It demonstrates the use of \maketitle, \title and \author. Comments: I'm not sure what the purpose of \reporttitle etc. is. If you need to access ...


3

You can use enumitem: or you can create your own myenumerate environment: The above two options are included in the minimal example below. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{enumitem,lipsum} \setlist[enumerate]{label=(\alph*),wide=0pt} \newenvironment{myenumerate} {\setcounter{enumi}{0}% Restart enumerate numbering ...


3

You could use a \mathclap from mathtools and then add some space before the limit value: \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{mathtools} \usefonttheme[only math]{serif} \begin{document} \begin{align*} n^{\frac{1}{n}} &= \exp\Bigl(\frac{1}{n}\ln(n)\Bigr) \\ &= \exp\Bigl(\frac{1}{n}\ln(n)\Bigr) \\ ...


1

You have spurious spaces. I also removed \noindent from the loop, put it outside, and put \allowbreak before any \fbox. With \offinterlineskip all goes well. If you want to have another things in the document, you should enclose everything in a group \begingroup .. \endgroup. \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{fullpage} ...


1

Easy for the collumns space. Use % at the end of line to remove any extra space. To remove the vertical space, you have to use negative space to move the box up. (I'll edit soon) \fbox{text text text text text text text text text text text}% \fbox{text text text text text text text text text text text}\\


2

The hyphen is one of the "exceptions" (like full stop, comma...) where \xspace does not set a space. You can eliminate it from the predetermined list of exceptions through \usepackage{xspace} \xspaceremoveexception{-} in the preamble. Of course this might have other unwanted effects, for you mostly do not want a space before a hyphen. To correct this ...


2

It is not \pagebreak, but fancyhdr. If you look at the warnings in the log file, you'll see Package Fancyhdr Warning: \headheight is too small (0.0pt): Make it at least 12.0pt. We now make it that large for the rest of the document. This may cause the page layout to be inconsistent, however. This explains the fact that the second page is moved 12pt ...


5

This is a problem, but only in certain instances. Consider the following minimal example: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} Some text\footnote{abc} with a footnote. \par Some text \footnote{def} with a footnote. \par Some text \footnote{ghi} with a footnote. \par Some text \footnote{jkl} with a footnote. \end{document} The \footnote with a ...


2

The fences are symmetric with respect to the formula axis (the imaginary line where fraction lines sit). In the case of \overrightarrow{\nabla}, the size chosen is the same as for \Bigg, which extends way down the formula axis. There's no need that the fences cover the whole construction, in particular the arrow. Here's a visual sample, where I use the ...


0

For this math font and combination of letters, I think you need to insert a negative thinspace, \!, i.e., write \alpha_{\!p} instead of just \alpha_!p. This applies to cases where \alpha is on the baseline or in the first subscript position. The following screenshot shows the letter combinations with this adjustment on the left, and without the adjustment ...


2

No guarantee! Might effect parts of your document which you do not want to change. % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{newtxtext} \usepackage{newtxmath} \catcode`_=\active \newcommand_[1]{\sb{\mspace{-1.5mu}#1}} \pagestyle{empty} \begin{document} $\lambda_{\alpha_p}$ $l_{\alpha_p}$ \end{document}


0

You can use the titlesec package, that you've already loaded. I changed the code to make it compilable (e.g. the code gave errors such as: missing \TEST definition or missing custom-acronym style definition) and removed the packages not needed. I decreased the space between the top margin and the title using \vspace{...}; you can change this value in order ...


2

I'd suggest using a full tabular-like implementation - using tabularx - to set that part of the CV construction. Also, to avoid using a list and set the content as rows inside your table... it's not that difficult to maintain this way, and provides you with the control you want inside such a rigid structure. % ...


1

You could use side-by-side minipage environments, each 0.5\textwidth wide. Use an equation* environment in the first, and an equation environment in the second. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage[margin=1in]{geometry} \begin{document} \setcounter{equation}{7} % just for this example \noindent Therefore, the consumption-based price ...


0

There's no need for using a "two-column layout" here. Instead, use a single equation with either a fixed space between (something like \qquad) or one of amsmath's align-like environments to spread out the equations evenly: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[margin=1in,showframe]{geometry}% Just for this example \usepackage{amsmath,mleftright} ...


2

Given the desired output, I think that using multicols and two equation environments is not the right tool for the job at hand. You can either use just one equation adding some horizontal spacing or some other of the amsmath's environments if multi-row alignment is desired: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} $P_{O,t}$ are the ...


1

A slightly simpler way to do this, also with enumitem. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{enumitem} \newlist{mybullet}{description}{1} \SetLabelAlign{myleft}{$\bullet$\ #1\hfil} \setlist[mybullet]{align=myleft,labelwidth=1in,font=\normalfont,nosep} \begin{document} \noindent Some text \begin{mybullet} \item[Sept 2004]{Something} \item[May ...


1

You can use enumitem: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{enumitem} \newlist{list2}{itemize}{1} \setlist[list2]{ nosep, before={\let\makelabel=\mymakelabel}, leftmargin=*, labelwidth=6em, label={\hspace{6em}}, } \newcommand{\mymakelabel}[1]{\textbullet\ #1:\hfill} \begin{document} \noindent Example Paper Title \begin{list2} \item[June 2014] ...


2

I would just use minipages. For example: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} by the following CES aggregators: \noindent \begin{minipage}{.5\textwidth} \begin{equation} C_{O,t} \end{equation} \end{minipage}% \begin{minipage}{.5\textwidth} \begin{equation} C_{Z,t} \end{equation} \end{minipage} \end{document}


3

An environment such as gather* really ought to be used if, and only if, much of the material it contains is math stuff. That doesn't seem to be the case here. I take it that you want to center-set the text material. (Please advise if this isn't the case...) I can think of two ways your typesetting objective may be achieved: Use a center environment. ...


4

There is a method described in the nomencl manual, section 5.3: "Using a Long Table instead of a List". First of all, make a copy of nomencl.ist in your working directory and add the following lines at its end: item_0 "" delim_t " \\\\\n" The path of the original file is TEXMF\makeindex\nomencl (run kpsewhich nomencl.ist from the command line if you're ...


1

You can use alignat together with a hack for centering a column's contents: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \numberwithin{equation}{section} \makeatletter \newcommand{\Cen}[2]{% \ifmeasuring@ #2% \else \makebox[\ifcase\expandafter #1\maxcolumn@widths\fi]{$\displaystyle#2$}% \fi } \makeatother \begin{document} ...


3

The following example uses \stackrel to put the references above the equals sign. The phantom for the second line is set via \ooalign to avoid the explicit measurement of the references of the previous equation. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{hyperref} \numberwithin{equation}{section} \begin{document} ...


2

You can use tocloft and adjust these \setlength{\cftsecnumwidth}{2em} %% adjust \cftsetindents{subsection}{2em}{3em} %% adjust \cftsetindents{subsubsection}{5em}{4em} %% adjust Here, \cftsecnumwidth is the width of the box in which section numbers are typeset. From tocloft manual (page 10): Code \documentclass[12pt]{article} ...


0

I was having the same problem, and I found a ridiculously easy fix. Are you starting a new paragraph before you insert your figure float? I mean, are you pressing ENTER and then inserting the float? I was doing that, until I tried just inserting the float at the end of the paragraph, without pressing ENTER, and voila! Worked like magic. Seems stupid, but ...


1

You could use the eqlist package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{eqlist} \begin{document} \begin{eqlist}[\eqlistinit \labelsep 2em] \item[FOV] Field of View \item[A] Half-Angle of FOV (subscripts apply) \item[LONGER] a slightly longer item \end{eqlist} \end{document} It automatically aligns all definitions according to the longest term ...


2

I think you are looking for a tabbing: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{tabbing} \hspace{1cm} \= \kill FOV \> Field of View \\ A \> Half-Angle of FOV (subscripts apply) \end{tabbing} \end{document}


-2

\vspace*{-10mm} placed before \caption command does the trick. Just pick the number that works for you the best.


15

Since you want to use the blank next either between an opening atom (the open parenthesis) and a relation atom (\mid) or between a relation atom and a closing atom, you can define \blank to be a relation symbol: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\blank}{\mathrel{\;\cdot\;}} \begin{document} $C(\blank \mid F_{t-1})$ $C(x \mid \blank)$ \end{document} ...


0

Everyone on holidays here ... So I found the following solution: I use \raisebox{-3pt} in order to lower the baseline of the section headline by 3pt ("Grundlinienversatz"). Inside the \raisebox I have to use a \parbox to enable for linebreaks in the headline. This enables for correct vertical positioning of the headline itself. Finally, vertical spacing ...


4

The space between the double lines is hard-coded: 1.2pt, see the definition of \uuline in package ulem. The following example changes the definition in two ways: The hard-coded space is replaced by dimen register \uulinesep. Also the top line is aligned, not the bottom line. This avoids that the top line overprints the descenders or even moves above the ...


4

having found david's inquiry about this while cleaning out old files, i have finally investigated. while there is indeed extra (unwanted) space when two display environments are adjacent, and this space increases when color is added, the amsmath display environments are not designed to be used in this manner. all display material between two blocks of text ...


3

Rather than let the equation spill into one or both margins, I suggest you find ways to reduce its size. One way to make the matrix fit inside the text block consists of (i) setting the parameter \medmuskip, which governs the space around binary operators (such as -) to zero, (ii) reducing the amount of intercolumn whitespace, and (iii) switching to a ...


4

I propose two solutions: either you use \mathclap (from mathtools) so the equation overflows equally on both sides. A variant consists additionally in setting a smaller value of arraycolsep. or you use the medsize environment (from nccmath). Let me add that if you load geometry(without any option), you have more sensible margins and there is no ...


0

Why do you even use this auto-parantheses here? This is a perfect use-case of where not to use them. Just do: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{align} \begin{aligned} 4x+y-z =& \biggl(\!\int_3^7 dr +{} \\ & y+x\mathcal{M} \biggr). \end{aligned} \end{align} ...


2

All ingredients are in the comments to cited question already: \mleft...\mright avoids the additional space before \mleft and \mright, which would be introduced by \left and \right because the latter puts the contents in \mathinner. \nulldelimiterspace is added as space for \left. or \right.. This can be set to zero: \setlength{\nulldelimiterspace}{0pt} or ...


2

As barbara beeton has mentioned in her comment, the problem is that the statement is longer than one line, and the "best" breakpoint is at a location that forces the first line to be stretched. Below I present two possible solutions: the first one, using a local \raggedright and the second one, using a manual line break and some indentation: ...


0

I don't use ledmac but reledmac which has superseded it. But I have the same problem. I simply use: \linespread{1.1} in the preamble of my document to fix this issue.


2

This seems quite stable to me. Give it a try: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass[a4paper,oneside,11pt]{article} \usepackage[onehalfspacing]{setspace} \usepackage{ragged2e} \usepackage{microtype} \usepackage{marginnote} \newcommand{\sspmarginnote}[1]{\marginnote{\begin{spacing}{1}\vspace{-\baselineskip}\RaggedRight #1\end{spacing}}} \begin{document} ...


1

I think it's better to consider : as a binary operator (without a break point after it). \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[french]{babel} % just for testing \newcommand{\pcoor}[1]{% \begingroup\lccode`~=`: \lowercase{\endgroup \edef~}{\mathbin{\mathchar\the\mathcode`:}\nobreak}% [% opening symbol ...


1

The spurious spaces are due to the name of the file. If I change the first line into \ProvidesFile{dt-welsh.def}[2015/08/11]% the file is not loaded a bunch of times and this avoids the spurious spaces:


0

You can use: a\hfill b\hfill \hspace{0.01mm}


1

You don't need adjustwidth: just define a wide enough minipage and put it in a zero width box. Next, set the spacings for \section to zero except the last that must be -\baselineskip. \documentclass[draft]{article} \usepackage[showframe]{geometry} \usepackage[explicit]{titlesec} \newlength\mydimen \titleformat{name=\section} {} {} {0pt} {% ...



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