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1

prooftree is designed to set a proof in a centred, display environment, with appropriate vertical spacing. You don't want that so don't use the environment. Instead, use \DisplayProof to display the proofs in-line. This can be used to set proofs within text or side-by-side. I've used a regular center environment to display the two proofs centred and with ...


1

You can define a bprooftree (boxed proof tree) that encloses the proof tree in a box as wide as the tree. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{bussproofs} \usepackage{lipsum} % just for the example \newenvironment{bprooftree} {\leavevmode\hbox\bgroup} {\DisplayProof\egroup} \begin{document} \lipsum*[2] \[ \begin{bprooftree} \AxiomC{$\Gamma\vdash B $} ...


2

A simple solution is to wrap the two proof trees in a mintage each. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{bussproofs} \begin{document} \begin{minipage}{.45\textwidth} \begin{prooftree} \AxiomC{$\Gamma\vdash B $} \RightLabel{K} \UnaryInfC{$\Gamma,A\vdash B $} \end{prooftree} \end{minipage} \begin{minipage}{.45\textwidth} \begin{prooftree} ...


0

Not only do you need to adjust the placement of the plain style (\@algocf@capt@plain), you also need to adjust the construction of the caption (``): \documentclass[journal]{IEEEtran} \usepackage{algorithm2e} \makeatletter \renewcommand{\@algocf@capt@plain}{above} \renewcommand{\algocf@caption@plain}{\box\algocf@capbox\vskip\AlCapSkip}% \makeatother ...


4

You add vertical space in the same way you'd do outside itemize; it's not very clear why you'd do it in the first place. The following code works also with beamer. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{itemize} \item one \item two \bigskip \item three \end{itemize} \end{document}


4

How about the following: \documentclass{beamer} \begin{document} \frame{ \begin{itemize} \item one \item two \newline \item three \end{itemize} } \end{document}


0

Edit: A new answer, after changes in the question. This is an exemplary solution. The idea is clear: let all atoms have the same length. In place of width of Mn there may be some fixed length, in our small example length of Cl would be enough. Changing \setatomsep to a suitable value is left to you. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} ...


14

There is no difference. Let's look at how the output is constructed by adding \showoutput and checking the .log when compiling the following minimal example: \documentclass{article} \pagestyle{empty}% To avoid page numbers in the output \showoutput% Show how the output is constructed \begin{document} $xy=1$ $x y = 1$ \end{document} This is extracted from ...


12

There is no difference between $xy=1$ and $x y = 1$ or $ x y = 1 $. They are rendered the same exactly: The spacing depends on the classification into math atoms: $ \mathord{x} \mathord{y} \mathrel{=} \mathord{1} $ Spacing: There is not spacing at the begin or end of the formula except for \mathsurround, which is usually 0 pt. No space between ...


5

I would suggest using enumitem to create list to suit your needs: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{enumitem} \newlist{noitemize}{itemize}{1} \setlist[noitemize]{label={}, labelsep=0pt, leftmargin=0pt} \begin{document} \noindent Some reference text. \begin{itemize} \item foo \item[] bar \end{itemize} \begin{itemize}[label={}] \item foo ...


1

I have used the following which puts x -> y under the limit. \lim\limit_{x \to y}


4

Expanding on my comment: acro's options regarding formatting accept code whose last macro may need a mandatory argument (if this shouldn't work for a formatting option I'd consider this an error on my part and would appreciate a message!). The contents of said argument will be the corresponding entry. So I would recommend using \DeclareAcronym{aureus}{ ...


1

As cgnieder correctly commented: Using long-format=\textit instead of long-format=\itshape does the trick.


0

tabu's way of doing this is to use \tabulinesep. From manual: Applying to your code (with some huge space for demo) \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{tabu} \begin{document} \[\tabulinesep=1cm %<--------------------------adjust 1cm \begin{tabu} {c | c c c c c c} \firsthline f & a_{11} & a_{12} & a_{21} & ...


5

I'd probably use array for this but in any case the same \extrarowheight parameter can be used: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{tabu} \begin{document} a \[ \begin{tabu} {c | c c c c c c} \firsthline f & a_{11} & a_{12} & a_{21} & a_{22} & b_1 & b_2 \\ \hline 1 & a_{11}^1 & a_{12}^1 & ...


8

LaTeX is so not designed for this kind of document. But if you must, must. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \setlength\unitlength{1cm} \vspace*{\fill} \noindent \begin{picture}(0,0)\bfseries\large \put(4,3){\includegraphics{house}} \put(0.5,5){\parbox{5cm}{\raggedright If you are feeling generous I'd like a house, ...


8

At the beginning of each tikzpicture, TikZ selects nullfont and sets \spaceskip to zero. Then, in each node content, TikZ resets \spaceskip to .3333em. Here is a solution: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \spaceskip 2ex \tikzset{every node/.style={execute at begin node={\spaceskip 2ex}}} \begin{document} \noindent a b c\\ \tikz{% \node ...


0

I can't compile your document without boiboites.sty, but I think your "issue" is due to the book documetclass. Book uses the \flushbottom command to stretch and compress content wherever allowed in order to make all the pages end exactly at the bottom margin to make all content justified on all sides, not just the left and right. Adding \raggedbottom to ...


1

You can use \makebox to specify the width of the blocks. As the other answer shows, are other box commands that will give you other options like text wrapping (see texdoc lshort). If you want the date flush right you can just put an \hfill before it. This will all be simpler to write if you define a macro that spaces and formats your headers so that you can ...


2

Use it this way: \documentclass[a4paper]{scrartcl} \usepackage[absolute]{pst-abspos} \begin{document} \section{one} \pstPutAbs(5,-5){Hi} \newpage \section{two} \pstPutAbs(6,-5){Hi} \end{document} With [absolute] it is internally already set at the beginning of the first page. And with \newpage it is set on the following page.


4

One non-tabular approach using the tabto package: \documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{scrreprt} \usepackage{tabto} \parindent0pt \parskip.5em \begin{document} \NumTabs{3} \noindent {\bfseries Book title} \tab{\bfseries Author's name} \tab{2010} This book is about some guy who wrote a book because he felt like a book would be a good thing to write.....etc etc ...


4

You need to alter the value of \labelsep for the list. The default is 0.5em. This changes that to 1.5em: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{regexpatch} \usepackage{algpseudocode} \makeatletter \xpatchcmd{\algorithmic}{\labelsep 0.5em}{\labelsep 1.5em}{\typeout{Success!}}{\typeout{Oh dear!}} \makeatother \begin{document} \begin{algorithmic}[1] \State ...


5

There are not many uses for it besides after control sequences or to ensure non extended spaces after periods that are not punctuation (but in these cases, a tie ~ would be better). The tie is defined in terms of \ : in Plain TeX it is \def~{\penalty\@M \ } % tie while in LaTeX we see \def~{\nobreakspace{}} ...


5

The following is taken directly from Knuth's TeXbook (Chapter 3: Controlling TeX, p 8): When a space comes after a control word (an all-letter control sequence), it is ignored by TeX; i.e., it is not considered to be a "real" space belonging to the manuscript that is being typeset. But when a space comes after a control symbol, it's truly a space. ...


5

Put this just before the \begin{document} \makeatletter \renewcommand*{\makeletterclosing}{ \@closing\\[3em]% {\includegraphics[width=2cm]{example-image-a} \par \bfseries \@firstname~\@lastname}% \ifthenelse{\isundefined{\@enclosure}}{}{% \\% \vfill% {\color{color2}\itshape\enclname: \@enclosure}}} \makeatother Change ...


3

memoir (like most classes) has an [openany] option the same as the standard classes to allow opening pages on either side. After \documentclass[openany]{memoir} \chapter is not constrained to open on an odd page, and so will not throw a blank page but simply place the heading on an even or odd page depending on the current position.


2

if it's just for one use, i wouldn't bother with a definition: XXmy long textXX XX\rlap{short}\phantom{my long text}XX granted, it uses "plain" commands, not latex. it can easily be made into a macro if you really want to, though just for the "simple" case.


4

With the calc package you can simply say \makebox[\widthof{my long text}][l]{short} A personal command seems appropriate: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{calc} \newcommand{\textover}[3][l]{% % #1 is the alignment, default l % #2 is the text to be printed % #3 is the text for setting the width \makebox[\widthof{#3}][#1]{#2}% } \begin{document} ...


5

You can just put the short text in a box of zero width and then place the phantom afterwards as follows \makebox[0pt][l]{short}\phantom{my long text} \documentclass{article} \begin{document} XX\makebox[0pt][l]{short}\phantom{my long text}XX XXmy long textXX \end{document}


4

Here are two solutions, first with eqnarray, then with align (an environment provided by the amsmath package). Note the absurdly large amount of space around the = symbols when using eqnarray -- it's one of the reasons why eqnarray is considered badly deprecated these days and really shouldn't be used anymore. Incidentally, since both eqnarray and align set ...


0

You could think of ${\overline A}_1$ as being defined as $\overline{A_1}$ in which case you have the shorter line and can just write \overline A_1.


1

Certainly something like $\overline{A_1}$, because it is closure of $A_1$. But I understand, that the rule may look a bit too long for you. Indeed, there is no italic correction for math font. If you prefer a bit shorter version, see, e.g. answers to Appearance issues with \bar{} and \underline{}.


6

This separation is specifically called \doublerulesep, with the default set to 2\p@ (or 2pt). In fact, the gap is actually \doublerulesep-\arrayrulewidth: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{c | c} cell 1,1 & cell 1,2\\ \hline\hline cell 2,1 & cell 2,2\\ \end{tabular} \setlength{\doublerulesep}{2\arrayrulewidth} ...


1

Ah, that's a different question. Unfortunately, a math symbol can be either of class mathopen or mathclose, but not both at the same time. But the following construction should do: \mathclose{\arrowvert}\mathopen{} for an equivalent to \middle\arrowvert. I tested it and on my screen it looks the same. But, since \arrowvert is of type mathord (and not ...


2

Don't forget % at ends of lines: \documentclass[10pt,letterpaper]{article} \usepackage[letterpaper,margin=0.75in]{geometry} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{tabularx} \usepackage{mdwlist} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{textcomp} %\usepackage{tgpagella} \pagestyle{empty} \setlength{\tabcolsep}{0em} % format two pieces of text, one left aligned ...


1

This solution does not understand the mechanism behind the code (not up to par anyway), but based on the given code for inserting vertical space for every second row, this solution found the logic behind it and this is how this solution is generated here. Code \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{booktabs} \usepackage{dcolumn} \begin{document} ...


0

Note the exact behaviour of \middle in eTeX as spelled out in the reference (http://archiv.dante.de/projects/nts/archiv/etex-ref-prel.html#middle): analogous to TeX's \left and \right, \middle specifies that the following delimiter is to serve both as a right and left delimiter; it will be set with spacing appropriate to a right delimiter w.r.t. ...


4

According to the beamer manual you can use the textpos package to position things absolutely on a page: 12.8 Positioning Text and Graphics Absolutely Normally, beamer uses TEX’s normal typesetting mechanism to position text and graphics on the page. In certain situation you may instead wish a certain text or graphic to appear at a page position that ...


2

I will agree with @egreg that this does not seem to be the right way to do what you intend. In any case, if you insist, here's what I suggest. Beamer uses \vfill to vertically justify your slide. You may think of it this way: there's a \vfill above your slide's contents and one more below them. So, roughly speaking, the \vfill that you introduce only ...


6

The problem goes if you lose this line %\parskip2ex plus1ex minus1ex or even just change it to \parskip2ex plus1ex %minus1ex Putting lots (or any) of shrink glue into the vertical list rather complicates the assessment of whether there is room... longtable could try harder to estimate the amount of glue that will really stretch/shrink but currently, ...


3

Here are a few options: Code: \documentclass[a4paper,10pt]{article} \usepackage{showframe} \usepackage{amsthm} \usepackage{amsmath, amssymb, amsfonts} \usepackage{dsfont} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \parbox{0.7\linewidth}{ Als X een overaftelbare deelverzameling van $\mathds{R}$ is, dan is er een bijectie van X naar $\mathds{R}$. $\implies$ it ...


2

Here with Plain TeX $$\eqalign{39{\tt{A}}_{12}\cr \underline{+{4{\tt B}8_{12}}}\cr{\kern1pt{\hbox to 0.85cm{}}398_{12}\hskip 0pt}}$$ \bye


1

I was going to comment, but then it would have been impossible to show you the results I was getting. Perhaps we should wait for someone, versed in metafun, to provide you with more options, and if this answer I find it, even a bit misleading, I will delete it afterward. Back to the question, I just don't see any problem if you were to increase offset, as ...


1

I would probably go for "poor-mans narrow", made by narrowing the bold font. As well, I believe that as digits, the letters should be always typeset upright and not italic. \documentclass[margin=5pt]{standalone} \usepackage{amsmath,graphicx,calc} \makeatletter \newcommand*\ww[1]{\mathpalette\ww@{#1}} ...


7

If you're happy with typewriter type letters, here's a way: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,calc} \newenvironment{dozenal} {\begingroup\lccode`~=`A \lowercase{\endgroup\def~}{\doz{A}}% \begingroup\lccode`~=`B \lowercase{\endgroup\def~}{\doz{B}}% \mathcode`A="8000 \mathcode`B="8000 } {} \newcommand{\doz}[1]{% ...


6

Some possibilities, I'd probably use the last: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,graphicx} \newcommand\w[1]{\resizebox{5pt}{!}{$#1$}} \begin{document} \[ \begin{array}{c} \phantom{+} \, 39A_{12} \\ \underline{+ \, 488_{12}} \\ \phantom{+} \, 866_{12} \end{array} \] \[ \begin{array}{c} \phantom{+} \, 3\mathtt{9A}_{12} \\ \underline{+ \, ...


1

You are specifying [display] which typesets the label of the chapter in a separate paragraph. However, you are also specifying an empty label. So you get an empty paragraph for each \chapter. Since unnumbered chapters don't get labels anyway, there is no such paragraph in those cases. If you do not want numbered chapters, you should use \chapter*. Or, if, ...


5

The example has lots of strange markup. I removed the \, (letterspacing should be applied elsewhere) and all the page styles (why change pagestyle each chapter???). I then added \showoutput so that TeX leaves a representation of the page in the log file. % [[- LaTeX prelude \documentclass[11pt,letterpaper,oneside]{book} %\usepackage{fontspec} ...


7

As clearly shown in your error message $ \decayarrow} \mu + \num$ You have a } with no { in that math expression. The markup is hmm strange, you really shouldn't have any \hspace or \newline within the document markup. Hard to say from a fragment but this should presumably be using align. in addition \hbox{\big|}\ from the definition you show will ...


5

article by default uses \raggedbottom so the format adds stretch glue at the bottom of each page, your \vfil balances that glue so they both stretch the same anount, centring the text in the remaining space. If you use ll glue then it expands to the full amount and the l glue from \raggedbottom is restricted to its natural size of 0pt.



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