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0

What could go wrong? \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \newif\ifvec \def\advancedsp#1{\sp{\ifvec\,\global\vecfalse\fi#1}}% \let\normalvec\vec \def\vec{\vectrue\normalvec}% \catcode`\^=\active \let^\advancedsp \[ \vec{r}_{i}^{2} \] \end{document}


7

i nearly always agree with david, but i think a little less space is called for: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ \vec{r}_{i}^{2} \quad {\vec{r}_{i}}^{\,2} \] \end{document}


4

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ \vec{r}_{i}^{2} \quad {\vec{r}_{i}{}}^{2} \] \end{document}


2

May I suggest an alternative approach: Use $\vee$ and $\wedge$ as superscripts, like $f^\vee$ and $f^\wedge$.


4

Adjust the amount of lowering (now 0.5ex) to suit your need. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \makeatletter \newcommand\post@accent[2]{% \mbox{\fontsize{#2}{\z@}\selectfont\raisebox{-0.5ex}[\dimexpr\height-0.5ex][0pt]{$\m@th\,#1{}$}}% } \newcommand{\definepostaccent}[2]{% ...


4

Something like this? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % for \text macro \begin{document} $f\text{\v{}}$ $f\text{\^{}}$ $f\text{\u{}}$ $f\text{\={}}$ $f\text{\.{}}$ $f\text{\"{}}$ \end{document}


4

As suggested in my comment, the \overset macro of the amsmath package is designed to accomplish this task. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ A \overset{\beta}{=} B \] \end{document} Using \stackrel, this is the syntax: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ A \stackrel{\beta}{=} B \] \end{document} And, finally, ...


1

Try: $ \mathop = \limits^\beta $


2

See section 3.2.1 of the manual: 3.2.1 Contextual analysis of hamza As with ArabTeX, a contextual analysis of the input encoding is performed (at the font-mapping level) to automatically determine the carrier of the hamza, as illustrated by the following examples: \begin{arab} 'amruN, 'ibiluN, 'u_htuN, '"u_ht"uN, '"Uql"Id"Is, ra'suN, 'ar'asu, sa'ala, ...


1

I use a combination of the \stackrel and \phantom commands. In particular \newcommand{\rz}[1]{\stackrel{#1}{\phantom{.}}} seems to work well (i.e. looks pretty natural) in many cases. If you want precise control, I suppose you can replace the \phantom{.} with \phantom{\begin{minipage}{0.001\textwidth}\vspace{#2}\end{minipage}} Then the #2 argument ...


3

Put an empty {} in front like {}^{\Tr} \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \newcommand{\Tr}{\mathsf{T}} \begin{document} \begin{equation} ( a - b )^{\Tr} {\underbrace{( c - d )}_{= c}}{}^{\Tr} ( e - f )^{\Tr} \end{equation} \end{document}


2

I suggest you use the \cramped macro, which is provided by the mathtools package, for this job. The left-hand term, without the underbrace, has the transpose signal at the desired height. The middle term features the transpose symbol in a position that's slightly too elevated. Using \cramped, as is shown on the right, achieves your objective. ...


6

You can use \renewcommand*\div{\mathbin{\mskip1mu\nonscript\mskip-1mu% ∕% \mskip1mu\nonscript\mskip-1mu}} or some value other than 1mu the skip is always added but in non-script (ie text and display) styles add the negative amount to cancel it out.


2

You can use a \mathstrut: \documentclass{book} \begin{document} \[ C{\mathstrut}^{\,\,l_\beta}_{m_\beta}{\mathstrut}^2_0{\mathstrut}^{\,\,l_\alpha}_{m_\alpha} \] \end{document} Here is a proposition which may be fine tuned. \documentclass{book} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[C\!% \begin{smallmatrix} l_{\beta} & \!\!2 & \!\!l_{\alpha} ...


2

This is done on purpose, in order to avoid excessive height when not really needed. Inside \overline, the current math style changes into the “cramped” variant. You can revert to the uncramped one by explicitly selecting it or using a command that does it for you. \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\roverline}[1]{\mathpalette\doroverline{#1}} ...


0

Is this what you are looking for? The example you gave does what it says, it puts a line over N^2. If you tell it to square \overline{N}, you get the result I think you want. \documentclass[border=2pt]{standalone} \begin{document} $\overline{N}^2$ \end{document} If you actually want the 2 to appear above the line, you'd want to use a custom ...


4

This should be declared as a \mathop; here is an implementation where the symbol is as high as a summation symbol. % define the extension font also in smaller sizes (not relevant to the problem) \font\sevenex=cmex7 \font\fiveex=cmex7 scaled 714 \scriptfont3=\sevenex \scriptscriptfont3=\fiveex \catcode`@=11 % \squareop is a math operator like \sum ...


2

TeX has the following math "styles": \textstyle, which is the default style for inline maths ($...$); \displaystyle, which is the default style for display maths ($$...$$), which is roughly the same as \textstyle, except \mathop atoms such as the \sum get the \limits after them so that the limits are displayed straight above/below the atoms; \scriptstyle ...



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