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This code snippet doesn't bring a double superscript error. align is not used, also no alignment marker &. However, \r would bring an error, I guess you (re)defined it you should not use \textbf{\theta} in math context. Instead, use \boldsymbol of amsmath. It even works for bold Greek letters. You should use \sin for the sine operator, so it would be ...


3

A little space can be added at the start of the superscript: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ \tilde{t}_{k_1}^{\,k_3} \] \end{document}


2

You could also simply write out the word. 1st = first, 2nd = second, and so on. Probably better in a formal setting anyway. If this is in a figure or table then any of the above answers sound great, but in a paragraph setting there's no need to get too cute.


2

this is the style of sub- and superscripts used for tensor notation, which, i have been led to believe, can go on and on ... the example here is probably bogus, but the technique is straightforward. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ F_a{}^b{}_c{}^d \] \end{document}


2

Some variants: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ F_a^b, F_a^{\,b}, F_a^{\>b}, F_a^{\;b}, {F_a}^b \] \end{document}


3

A quick and dirty way is to use \, for example for the superscript, which inserts a smaller space, \; even more and \quad will add (too) much space. As an alternative, the \indices - macro from tensor - package can be used if the covariant-contravariant way of superscripts/subscripts is needed! \documentclass{article} %\usepackage{mathtools} ...



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