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17

Don't reinvent the wheel. ;-) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{centernot} \begin{document} $\centernot{\infty}$ \end{document} Some manual adjusting can help: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{centernot} \begin{document} $\centernot{\mkern-0.35mu\infty}\mkern-0.35mu$ \end{document} Finding the exact geometric center is not really easy, ...


11

Your question is very unclear but I assume from the tag you are using beamer. \documentclass{beamer} %\usepackage[T1]{fontenc} %\showoutput \begin{document} \begin{frame} \textbf{aaa\textbackslash} aaa \textbackslash \end{frame} \end{document} Produces the warning LaTeX Font Warning: Font shape `OMS/cmss/bx/n' undefined (Font) ...


10

I can show you how to do this in clear plain TeX and in plain TeX with OPmac. First clear plain TeX: \newfam\hebfam \font\tmp=rcjhbltx at10pt \textfont\hebfam=\tmp \font\tmp=rcjhbltx at7pt \scriptfont\hebfam=\tmp \font\tmp=rcjhbltx at5pt \scriptscriptfont\hebfam=\tmp \edef\declfam{\ifcase\hebfam 0\or1\or2\or3\or4\or5\or6\or7\or8\or9\or A\or B\or ...


9

The four hexadecimal digits "kfab in a \mathchar specify k is the atom type (0 = ordinary, 1 = operator, 2 = binary operation, 3 = relation, 4 = opening, 5 = closing, 6 = punctuation, 7 = variable family); f the math group (font family) where the glyph should be taken from; ab the slot in the font. One can use \mathchar<15 bit number> directly or ...


8

A LaTeX complement to wipet's excellent answer. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{rcjhbltx}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{rcjhbltx}{m}{n}{<->rcjhbltx}{} \DeclareSymbolFont{hebrewletters}{U}{rcjhbltx}{m}{n} % remove the definitions from amssymb \let\aleph\relax\let\beth\relax \let\gimel\relax\let\daleth\relax ...


8

It certainly looks like a \mathfrak{Y}, for instance from esstix fonts (see mathalfa).


7

You can use something like A$\,\to\,$B or A\textrightarrow B (in text mode) from the textcomp package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{textcomp} \begin{document} A$\,\to\,$B A\textrightarrow B \end{document}


6

Indeed the symbols used by mathabx and MnSymbol are smaller than the default ones. But I suggest you not to load them, otherwise a lot of symbols will be changed by them. You can for example, extract the definitions from the mathabx package and use them in your document. MWE \documentclass{article} % Symbols \wedge and \vee from mathabx ...


6

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine} \renewcommand\stacktype{L} \stackMath \begin{document} $\stackon[0pt]{\infty}{/}$ \end{document} If you want the version that is a \mathrel and scales with the math style, \documentclass{article} \usepackage{scalerel,stackengine} \def\notinfty{% \renewcommand\stacktype{L}\mathrel{\ensurestackMath{% ...


6

Here's some possibility allowing you to easily define different integral symbols with decorations adapting to the math style: The code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{amssymb} \def\IntKern{} \newcommand\MySymbolint[2][0pt]{% \mathchoice ...


6

It's a precise choice of the font designers. The .vf file in this case is gdidotrg6a.vf and running vftovp gdidotrg6a.vf shows (BOUNDARYCHAR O 1) (LIGTABLE (LABEL BOUNDARYCHAR) (LIG C j O 14) (STOP) This means that the boundary chararacter is enabled for this font and, when j follows the boundary character, which is implicitly present at the ...


6

Use \centernot from the same package. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \usepackage{centernot} \begin{document} $\centernot{\lhd}$ \end{document}


5

There are three simple options. One is \fbox{}, the content of which is typeset in text mode, but can handle math mode as well. Loading the amsmath package provides \boxed{}, the content of which is typeset in math mode. Both of these can be used in text or math mode (i.e., you don't need to enter math mode first). Loading the mathtools package provides ...


4

Use the commands \mathopen, \mathclose and \mathrel: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand{\ldollar}{\mathopen{\$}} \newcommand{\rdollar}{\mathclose{\$}} \newcommand{\mdollar}{\mathrel{\$}} \begin{document} $\log\ldollar a+b\rvert-\{a\mdollar b\}$ \end{document}


4

Package tikzsymbols provides some symbols as well. As usual with tikz, you can apply scale and color changes. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikzsymbols} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{parskip} \begin{document} This is Max \Strichmaxerl and this is Jane \Strichmaxerl. The met over a \Coffeecup of nice and tasty coffee. Later they went for a ...


4

The following example uses the normal dot to generate the symbol: \mathpalette adds support for the different math styles. It is assumed, that the dot is on the base line with a correct character bounding box including symmetrical side bearings. The dot itself has the same width and height. The two dots of \udotdot lie on opposite corners of a square, ...


4

One option: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} \begin{document} $\Lambda(x)\underset{FP}{\overset{TP}{\gtrless}} T^{\ast}$ \end{document} Of course, define a command: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} \newcommand\gldec[2]{ \underset{#1}{\overset{#2}{\gtrless}} } \begin{document} ...


3

You can either import the single MnSymbol symbol, or create one that roughly matches it: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,amsmath} \newcommand{\udotdot}{\mathbin{\text{\rotatebox[origin=c]{45}{${\cdot}{\cdot}$}}}} \begin{document} $a \cdots e \cdot a \mathbin{\cdot\cdot} e \mathbin{{\cdot}{\cdot}} a \udotdot e$ $a \udotdot e_{a \udotdot e_{a ...


3

Here is some dirty messing of egreg's excellent solution. It is very raw and needs emergency treatment in ICU. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb,graphicx} \makeatletter \newcommand{\precneq}{\mathrel{\text{\prec@eq}}} \newcommand{\prec@eq}{% \oalign{% \hidewidth$\m@th\prec$\hidewidth\cr \noalign{\nointerlineskip\kern1ex}% ...


3

Here's a solution that builds the underbar with the help of picture mode. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{pict2e,picture} \makeatletter \newcommand{\pnrelbar}{% \linethickness{\dimen2}% \sbox\z@{$\m@th\prec$}% \dimen@=1.1\ht\z@ \begin{picture}(\dimen@,.4ex) \roundcap \put(0,.2ex){\line(1,0){\dimen@}} \put(\dimexpr ...


3

It's $\binom{-3}{1}$ from \usepackage{amsmath}, if you work in LaTeX. However, if you wanna make a vector instead, it's \begin{pmatrix}-3\\1\end{pmatrix} from the same package.


3

A good compromise is usually \centernot (from the package centernot). But sometimes \centernot is good, sometimes it isn't. For instance, \centernot{\in} produces a poorer result than \notin that uses the common slash instead. In other cases, some small adjustments are necessary: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{centernot} \begin{document} ...


2

A collection of three possible symbols, just propositions \documentclass{article} \usepackage[mathscr]{euscript} % Copied from mathrsfs.sty \DeclareSymbolFont{rsfs}{U}{rsfs}{m}{n} \DeclareSymbolFontAlphabet{\mathscrsfs}{rsfs} \begin{document} \huge $\mathcal{D}$ % Euscript $\mathscr{D}$ % Ralph Smith's font (mathrsfs.sty) $\mathscrsfs{D}$ ...


2

% arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{tikz-cd} \begin{document} \begin{tikzcd}%[column sep='what-ever-unit'] \arrow[Rightarrow]{r}{r} & \null \end{tikzcd} $\overset{r}{\Longrightarrow}$ $\xRightarrow{r}$ \end{document}


2

Here’s an approach using expl3 \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xparse} \ExplSyntaxOn \NewDocumentCommand{ \spacelist }{ m }{ \seq_set_split:Nnn \l_tmpa_seq { ~ } { #1 } \seq_map_inline:Nn \l_tmpa_seq { \fbox { ##1 } } } \ExplSyntaxOff \begin{document} List: \spacelist{Boxes and Spaces in a List} \end{document} The code uses so ...


2

If using LuaLaTeX/XeLaTeX, the fontawesome package provides this possibility: \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{fontawesome} \begin{document} \begin{frame} \begin{description} \item[\faSmile] good \item[\faMeh] indifferent \item[\faFrown] bad \end{description} \end{frame} \end{document}


2

You need the mathabx package: For such things I highly recommend trying: texdoc symbols Code: \documentclass[border=5mm]{standalone} \usepackage{mathabx} \begin{document} $X \sqsubsetneq B$ \end{document} Edit: just to complete, here is a print screen from the documentation cited.


1

You can as well use the yfonts package, following @egreg's answer here. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{yfonts} \begin{document} \textfrak{Y} \end{document}


1

After thinking a lot about the situation I found that the best solution wasn't actually import a png version of the character. And also I found that it could be good to have a way to change the character properties. Best way to solve the question is create the character using Tikz: \newcommand{\UNALsigma}[1]{% \scalebox{#1}{ \begin{tikzpicture}% ...


1

You can use \fbox in math mode: \fbox{1} But if you want to emphasise on something, there is \boxed (works like \fbox). When you want to put an equation line in a frame, \boxed doesn’t work and you will need to use \Aboxed from the mathtools package: \Aboxed{x & = 1}



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