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12

This is U+25AD (▭) and available as \hrectangle in unicode-math (if using xelatex or lualatex) or stix if using pdflatex (and will be available in other font packages that cover the Unicode math blocks) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stix} \begin{document} $a \hrectangle b $ \end{document}


11

May be this: \documentclass{article} \newcommand\mysym{% \mathrel{% {% \ooalign{\hidewidth$\mkern3mu\circ$\hidewidth\cr$<$}% }% }} \begin{document} \[ x\mysym U\] \end{document}


9

Partial solution. \usepackage{graphicx} \renewcommand*\partial{\textsf{\reflectbox{6}}}


9

Here are some possibilities: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} $x^{*2}\quad x^{*\,2}\quad {x^{*}}^{2}\quad (x^{*})^{2}$ \end{document} I'd prefer the last one that's less ambiguous.


8

The character ⋸ is the Unicode character U+2278, see Barbara Beeton's comment. I found two math fonts, which contains the charactes: Asana Math XITS Math They can be used with XeTeX or LuaTeX. With package unicode-math, the command is \isinvb, or the character can be given directly as UTF-8 character or the ^^^^-escape notation can be used: ...


8

A good occasion for \ooalign, one of the best tricks in my toolbox: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \newcommand{\rectangle}{{% \ooalign{$\sqsubset\mkern3mu$\cr$\mkern3mu\sqsupset$\cr}% }} \begin{document} $S(\rectangle)$ \end{document} Experiment changing 3mu for different ratios between width and height.


7

The \downarrow symbol is an extensible delimiter: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\xdownarrow}[1]{% {\left\downarrow\vbox to #1{}\right.\kern-\nulldelimiterspace} } \begin{document} $ \downarrow \big\downarrow \Big\downarrow \bigg\downarrow \Bigg\downarrow \xdownarrow{2cm} $ \end{document}


7

The symbol you need to use is produced by the following command: \divideontimes


6

Those symbols are in IPA: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tipa} \begin{document} \textsubbridge{t}\quad \textyogh\quad \textesh\quad \textdyoghlig\quad \textteshlig \end{document} For the last one you might prefer \texttoptiebar{t\textesh} The characters are available in some OpenType fonts, for example FreeSerif. Compile the following with ...


6

This is a first approximation: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\ineq}{% \mathrel{\mkern1mu\underline{\mkern-1mu\in\mkern-1mu}\mkern1mu}} \begin{document} $\alpha\ineq\beta$ \end{document} This automatically changes size in subscripts. You may prefer a solution with a roundcap bar below the main symbol: \documentclass{article} ...


6

This should do (not in script styles) \documentclass{article} \makeatletter \newcommand\tint{\mathop{\mathpalette\tb@int{t}}\!\int} \newcommand\bint{\mathop{\mathpalette\tb@int{b}}\!\int} \newcommand\tb@int[2]{% \sbox\z@{$\m@th#1\int$}% \if#2t% \rlap{\hbox to\wd\z@{% \hfil \vrule width .35em height \dimexpr\ht\z@+1.4pt\relax depth ...


6

Well, Private Use Areas are part of Unicode, they just have no predefined meaning. So you can use them like any other character, e.g. by simply typing it (if you have an appropriate input method) or using the character code either as \char"F3A0F or ^^^^^f3a0f. If I run your example here, I get a PDF with the symbol both with LuaTeX and XeTeX.


6

You can use \renewcommand*\div{\mathbin{\mskip1mu\nonscript\mskip-1mu% ∕% \mskip1mu\nonscript\mskip-1mu}} or some value other than 1mu the skip is always added but in non-script (ie text and display) styles add the negative amount to cancel it out.


5

If you want really curly curly braces and wish to use a Times-like math font -- as would seem to be the case because of your consideration of the newtxmath package -- you should look into using the mtpro2 font package. ("mtpro2" is short for "MathTime Professional II".) The full mtpro2 package isn't free of charge. However, its "lite" subset, which is all ...


5

The different 'sizes' for fonts in math-mode are: \displaystyle \textstyle \scriptstyle \scriptscriptstyle If you want to change their value, you could do: \DeclareMathSizes{d-size}{t-size}{s-size}{ss-size} In your example, I would just define a new command for your subscript: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} ...


5

There are thousands of fonts and a good number of those have a S sign, it's hard to know what to suggest, here's a few... \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{tgpagella} \usepackage{tgbonum} \DeclareMathSymbol{\dd}{\mathalpha}{letters}{`$} \begin{document} \showoutput \[ \$ \textit{\fontfamily{cmr}\selectfont\$} ...


5

How about using cmbright to get sans serif math and rotating the \partial? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{cmbright} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand{\upartial}{\rotatebox[origin=c]{15}{\ensuremath{\partial\mkern-2mu}}} \begin{document} \[\frac{\partial x}{\partial t}\quad\textnormal{vs.}\quad\frac{\upartial x}{\upartial t}\] \end{document} Edit: ...


4

\documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{kpfonts} \def\uppartial{{\mathversion{sf}\ensuremath{\partialup}}} \begin{document} $\partial$ partial derivative symbol in \LaTeX \sffamily \uppartial{} partial derivative symbol in \LaTeX \end{document} You can also use \usepackage[partialup]{kpfonts} if you do not need the default version. ...


4

tabular only needs to be in a table environment if you want the table to be able to float in the document. If you want the table exactly where you placed it then you don't need to use table environment at all. The {|c|>{$}c<{$}|} is making the second column to automatically be in math mode. That is why you needed \text and could say 48.17 \pm 0.25 ...


4

Possibly the pic syntax provides one fairly easy way to go: \documentclass[varwidth, border=5]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \tikzset{symbols/.cd, smiley/.pic={ \draw circle [radius=1/2] (225:1/3) arc (225:315:1/3) (135:1/4) circle [radius=1/32] (45:1/4) circle [radius=1/32]; } } \newcommand\tikzsymbol[2][]{\tikz\pic[#1]{symbols/#2};} ...


4

I would recommend the unicodes U+2A79 and U+2A7A for this, as they are already defined in unicode-math. They are less similar to \sphericalangle and thus easier to distinguish. You need Lua- or XeLaTeX for this. % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} \setmathfont{XITS Math} ...


4

You can define your own command, for example: The code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand\xdownarrow[1][2ex]{% \mathrel{\rotatebox{90}{$\xleftarrow{\rule{#1}{0pt}}$}} } \begin{document} \[ \xdownarrow\quad \xdownarrow[30pt]\quad \xdownarrow[2.5cm] \] \end{document} The default length is 2ex and you ...


4

\documentclass[12pt]{report} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \newcommand{\rectangle}{\fboxsep0pt\fbox{\rule{1em}{0pt}\rule{0pt}{1ex}}} \begin{document} $s\rectangle$ \end{document}


3

It depends on what you expect a “sans serif dagger” would be. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{textcomp} \newcommand{\sfdagger}{{\sffamily\textdagger}} \newcommand{\sfdaggerdbl}{{\sffamily\textdaggerdbl}} \begin{document} A\sfdagger A\textdagger A\sfdaggerdbl A\textdaggerdbl \end{document} Of course, if the text is already sans serif, there's no ...


3

You can also draw it with tikz which gives you a lot of flexibility should you desire any customization such as arrow styles, colors, and line styles: Code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{xparse}% So that we can have two optional parameters \NewDocumentCommand\DownArrow{O{2.0ex} O{black}}{% ...


3

While it would be possible to get the arrow you want, it's better to use a dedicated package for drawing these diagrams: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{tikz-cd} \begin{document} \begin{tikzcd}[column sep=1.2em] 0 \arrow[r] & C_{3} \arrow[r,hook] & \mathit{SL}_{3}(\mathbb{C}) \arrow[r,two heads] & ...


3

There is a unicode for this and here are the four fonts I could find to set this: % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} A{\fontspec{code2001_0.ttf}\symbol{"1D12B}}B{\fontspec{freeserif.ttf}\symbol{"1D12B}}D{\fontspec{quivira.otf}\symbol{"1D12B}}E{\fontspec{symbola.ttf}\symbol{"1D12B}} \end{document} ...


3

The musixtex package provides a font (in five sizes and only one variant) which has the symbol (instead of a »3«). Here is one possibility to use it in text: \documentclass{article} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{musix}{}% \DeclareFontShape{U}{musix}{m}{n}{% <-12> musix11 <12-15> musix13 <15-18> musix16 <18-23> musix20 <23-> ...


3

The easiest version of course is just to use $f''(x)$ as egreg mentioned in comments. This is supported by pdfLaTeX and really easy to type. The prime, double prime, and triple prime have their own unicodes U+2032, U+2033, and U+2034 which you could address with help of the package fontspec via \symbol{"2032}.... This will require Xe- or LuaLaTeX. ...


3

Here are some possibilities with the use of unicode (just as a demonstrative addition to Adam's answer). The Unicode for this symbol is U+22C7. % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{unicode-math} \begin{document} ...



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