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39

There are some issues to consider: Line width The standard line width in TeX is 0.4pt, it is hardcoded in TeX as 26214sp. \overline uses a different line width. It is taken from font parameter 8 of math font family 3 in TeX. The standard math fonts (Computer Modern) are using 0.39998pt in all font sizes. But it is scalable in other fonts, e.g. package ...


16

Here is a plain TeX solution. The downside is, that \everymath is executed inside the "house". If you want every house to have the same height and depth, add a strut or a phantom inside it. \nopagenumbers% for cropping \def\house#1{{% \setbox0=\hbox{$#1$} \vrule height \dimexpr\ht0+1.4pt width .4pt depth \dp0\relax \vrule height ...


14

There are other font that can be used: MnSymbol: FdSymbol: TX fonts: PX fonts: cjhebrew: OpenType fonts (LuaTeX/XeTeX): Latin Modern Math: Asana Math: XITS Math: TeX Gyre Pagella Math: TeX Gyre Termes Math: Linux Libertine: GNU FreeFont/FreeSerif: GNU FreeFont/FreeSans: MnSymbol \documentclass{article} % ...


14

The command \[\mu\] is a short version of \begin{equation*} \mu \end{equation*} which is normally used for longer formulas. If you want to typeset (short) formulas like μ, you should use the inline-math mode, i.e. This is an example text containing the greek letter $\mu$.


10

With the horizontal bar slightly protruding: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{array} \newcommand\house[1]{% \begingroup\setlength\arraycolsep{0pt} \begin{array}[t]{@{\mkern1mu}c@{}|c|@{}c@{\mkern1mu}} \firsthline &\;#1\;{}& \end{array} \endgroup } \begin{document} $\house{\alpha + \beta} \leq \house{\alpha} + ...


10

Update: with version 4.5 (2014/04/08) chemformula has a basic native support for Kröger-Vink notation. It must be enabled with the option kroeger-vink=true: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemformula}[2014/04/08] \begin{document} \setchemformula{kroeger-vink} \ch{Al_{Al}^x} \ch{Ni_{Cu}^x} \ch{V_{Cl}^{*}} \ch{Ca_i^{**}} \ch{e'} \ch{Cl_i'} ...


10

The difference can be seen at the end of line. A space is breakable and a ~ is an un-breakable space. \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage[colorinlistoftodos]{todonotes} \title{Your Paper} \author{You} \date{\today} \begin{document} \maketitle ...


9

Spaces in math mode are ignored and replaced with the appropriate surrounding space required for each component (like a relational or binary operator, or atom). So, you should be fine with 4 \pi G \rho \delta although technically 4\pi G\rho\delta would suffice.


9

I copied the definition of \hbar, but inserted \delta instead of h and adjusted kerning. \nopagenumbers% for cropping \def\deltabar{{\mathchar '26\mkern -10mu\delta}} $\delta$ $\hbar$ $\deltabar$ \bye


8

Probably you are meaning \dh (U+00F0 LATIN SMALL LETTER ETH)? This is available in encoding T1: \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \begin{document} \begin{frame} \dh \end{frame} \end{document}


8

I followed the procedure described in Creating Logo with Fancy Font to create the S-logo as a vector graphic: Now you can add a \skype command to the moderncv interface, specifically the casual theme: \makeatletter % defines one's skype (optional) % usage: \skype{<email adress>} \newcommand*{\skype}[1]{\def\@skype{#1}} ...


7

Ultra simple: \documentclass{article} \newcommand*\mycircle{\textcircled{\textbullet}} \begin{document} This symbol is (for unknown reasons) represented by \mycircle. The symbol \mycircle{} is (for unknown reasons) not represented by anything. \end{document}


6

The \hslash symbol is a unique glyph. Here's an emulation of it obtained by scaling, rotating and raising a minus sign: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb,graphicx} \newcommand{\hslashslash}{% \raisebox{.9ex}{% \scalebox{.7}{% \rotatebox[origin=c]{18}{$-$}% }% }% } \newcommand{\dslash}{% {% \vphantom{d}% ...


6

Not very beautiful, as the kerning looks different for different symbols (the double harpoon gets shorter or longer for other symbols below). But if you just need it ones, it doesn't matter. Or you define it for each symbol with different magnitude of kerning. % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{unicode-math} ...


6

If you find a Hebrew font, you can use it; in this example I use the fonts provided by the cjhebrew package. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % from cjhebrew.sty (with scaling added) \DeclareFontFamily{U}{cjheb}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{cjheb}{m}{n}{% <-11> s*[1.2] cjhblsm <11-> s*[1.2] cjhbltx }{} ...


5

I suggest you load the mathtools package and define a new macro, say \norm, as follows: \DeclarePairedDelimiter{\norm}{\lVert}{\rVert} While doing so incurs (slight) setup cost, it has several important advantages: Your code will become more readable (and easier to debug...) because you'll be writing things like \norm{(a,b,c)}^2, which focuses attention ...


5

One option using TikZ (adjust the settings to suit your needs): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \newcommand\mycircle{% \begin{tikzpicture}[baseline=-1ex] \draw (0,0) circle [radius=5pt]; \fill (0,0) circle [radius=3pt]; \end{tikzpicture}% } \begin{document} A\mycircle B \end{document}


5

This example constructs the symbol with the help of other symbols. They can be used in both math and text mode. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{latexsym} \makeatletter \newcommand*{\obullet}{} \protected\def\obullet{% \ensuremath{% \mathbin{% \mathpalette\@bullet@o\odot }% }% } \newcommand*{\bulletcirc}{} \protected\def\bulletcirc{% ...


5

Does a look which uses \bigl and \bigr instead of \left and \right, i.e., making sure that the outer brackets and parentheses have the same size, meet your needs? \documentclass{article} \usepackage[euler-digits]{eulervm} % educated guess about fonts \usepackage{palatino} \newcommand{\rect}{\textbf{rect}} % don't use \mathbf as that would load Computer ...


5

You can use the cjhebrew package and add in the source file the following : \cjRL{t} \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{cjhebrew} \begin{document} Some text, a hebrew charcacter: \cjRL{t} \end{document} This gives the following output:


5

Here is my solution with a syntax much closer to the mathematical meaning \usepackage{mathtools} \providecommand\given{} % is redefined in \Set \newcommand\SetSymbol[1][]{\nonscript\:#1\vert\nonscript\:} \DeclarePairedDelimiterX\Set[1]{\{}{\}}{ \renewcommand\given{\SetSymbol[\delimsize]} #1 } Now we can simply use \Set{ x\in A \given x^2 > 1 } ...


4

The eulervm fonts are mildly calligraphic, but may serve your need. Here are a few letters in the font, including four pi' s at the end (lowercase, uppercase, and \mathbold [different than \mathbf]). Of course, once the package is loaded, all math symbols will be in this font. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{eulervm} \begin{document} ...


4

The solution, I think, is to update your TeX installation. However, as your other question shows, updating may not be without pitfalls of its own. I think it might be worth asking yourself just how much you need teubner. If it is only for the odd character (e.g. \koppa), I would think about whether there might be other ways to access those characters. The ...


4

You can use the newunicodechar package. (Also works with xelatex) \documentclass{article} \pagestyle{empty}% for cropping \usepackage[utf8]{inputenx} \usepackage{newunicodechar} \newunicodechar{〈}{\ensuremath{\langle}} \newunicodechar{〉}{\ensuremath{\rangle}} \begin{document} Here are angle〈 〉brackets. $Here are angle〈 〉brackets.$ \end{document}


4

An implementation with tikz, shamefully adapted from this answer \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \newcommand{\house}[1]{% \tikz[baseline]{\node[anchor=base,inner sep=0.3ex](mynode){\ensuremath{#1}}; \draw(mynode.south west)--(mynode.north west)--(mynode.north east)--(mynode.south east); \path[use as bounding ...


4

Never seen it either. However, here is a way of doing things: put everything into an array, with hhline to have a clean connection of vertical and horizontal lines. I define a normal and a bold version I don'tknow how to declare it, so as to have only one command for both versions): \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{mathtools} ...


4

We answer in the language of codes ;) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \begin{document} $\hbar$ $\hslash$ \end{document} \hbar needs no packages while \hslash needs amssymb. Generally we prefer one question per thread. The badboxes are detailed in your .log file with line numbers. You may also add --file-line-error option to pdflatex to ...


4

You could scale it (1.5x horizontal, 1.1x vertical). EDITED to work in all math styles (thanks, tohecz), and provided a slight vertical shift and kern for better matching. Lastly, enclosed in a group, so that it works directly in a subscript. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{scalerel} \let\oldaleph\aleph \def\aleph{{\ThisStyle{\scalebox{1.5}[1.1]{% ...


4

The following example defines \Rint that superimposes an R on the integral symbol. If the integral is used in \displaystyle, then the integral size is usually quite large and \textstyle is used for the R. Otherwise \scriptscriptstyle is used or scaled down, if the total height of R exceeds 40% of the total height of the integral. Remarks: The R is put in ...


4

Something like this? Code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand{\doublerightharpoonup}{% \rightharpoonup\mkern-10mu\rightharpoonup% } \begin{document} \[\overset{\doublerightharpoonup}{T}\] \end{document}



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