Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

If you are able to use Xe- or LuaLaTeX, you may use the unicode U+1F442 by copy pasting it in your source code or like in my following MWE: % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} \setmainfont{quivira.otf} \symbol{"1F442} \setmainfont{symbola.ttf} \symbol{"1F442} \end{document} When you have ...


16

Here, I just saved your ear image into a file (ear.pdf and/or ear.eps), and used a scaled \includegraphics to insert it. You can vary the size, which I set to a height of 2ex. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,dingbat} \def\ear{\includegraphics[height=2ex]{ear}} \begin{document} Ear and eye symbols: \ear{} and \eye \end{document}


12

A version lighter than using TikZ: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pict2e} \DeclareRobustCommand{\kumarsymbol}{% \begingroup\setlength{\unitlength}{\fontcharht\font`A}% \begin{picture}(.5,1) \roundcap \put(0,1){\line(2,-1){.25}} \put(.25,.875){\line(0,-1){.75}} \put(.25,.125){\line(2,-1){.25}} \end{picture}% \endgroup } ...


12

You can create a specific command \dbar for this purpose. \newcommand{\dbar}{d\hspace*{-0.08em}\bar{}\hspace*{0.1em}} Full Code \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\dbar}{d\hspace*{-0.08em}\bar{}\hspace*{0.1em}} \begin{document} $\hbar$, $\dbar$. \end{document} produces


11

If you are using pdfTeX, you can draw the symbol using PDF elementary commands and set it as the PDF form (this is like subroutine in PDF, the drawing commands are not repeated at the every instance of the symbol in PDF file). \def\drawmysymbol{\pdfliteral{q 1 J 0 8 m 3 5 l 3 1 l 6 -2 l S Q}} \setbox0=\hbox to8bp{\kern1bp\vrule height9bp depth3bp width0bp ...


11

Using the code from the entry The Principal Value Integral symbol (which defines the macro \dashint) in the UK List of TeX FAQs as a starting point, it is reasonably straightforward to define two new macros, \lowdashint and \highdashint, that place a "dash" symbol -- actually, a "minus" symbol -- a bit lower and a bit higher, respectively, than \dashint ...


11

Never seen such a symbol, but you can define it; choose a better name. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{centernot} \newcommand{\wrel}{% for ``weird relation'' \centernot{\mathrel{-}\joinrel\mathrel{-}}% } \begin{document} \[ W\wrel X \] \end{document} Notes. I use the fact that TeX doesn't add space between consecutive relation symbols; \joinrel ...


7

Please give us more information about the meaning and its usage. I searched the unicode for you and the most similar would be the U+23B1. This symbol is quite curly, but with the font Code222 it could be acceptable. You will have to compile my MWE with Xe- or LuaLaTeX. I made the symbol applicable for math- and text-mode. Further improvements can be done ...


7

I don't know whether this fact is documented (I can't see it in the manual, though), but the arabicfnt.sty that's automatically loaded has \DeclareRobustCommand{\times}{\fontfamily{artimes}\selectfont} which explains the mystery. You can solve the problem by adding to your document \DeclareMathSymbol{\mtimes}{\mathbin}{symbols}{"02} and using \mtimes ...


5

Another tikz answer: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \newcommand{\ultrarad}[1]{% \begin{tikzpicture} \node[inner ysep=0pt] (a) {\strut$#1$}; \draw[rounded corners=0.5ex] ([shift={(-0.5ex,0.7ex)}]a.south west) -- ([shift={(-0.5ex,0ex)}]a.south west)-- ([shift={(0.5ex,0ex)}]a.south west) -- ...


5

A pretty simple solution can be achieved with the tikz package. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \newcommand\mysymbol{% \tikz[scale=.3]{\draw[very thick] (0,0) to ++(330:.5) to ++(0,-1) to ++(330:.5);}% } \begin{document} Two single \mysymbol and \mysymbol . \end{document}


5

If you write in Portuguese, you need \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} and possibly add \usepackage{lmodern} to your document preamble. The first package is needed in order to make hyphenation of accented words possible also past an accent, which in Portuguese is essential. With this, an input such as Formato reconhecido <Especificador> will print as ...


5

The package MnSymbol defines \nleftrightline which looks similar: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{MnSymbol} \begin{document} $W \nleftrightline X$ \end{document}


5

You might use the Fetamont fonts: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{fetamont} \DeclareRobustCommand{\simtm}[1]{% \textsuperscript{\normalfont\ffmfamily\fontseries{lc}\selectfont#1}% } \begin{document} A\texttrademark\quad A\simtm{TM}\quad A\simtm{ABC} \end{document} that gives (the first for comparison)


4

Here's a version that works across math styles. EDITED to keep the same vertical height as the original elements \documentclass{article} \usepackage{scalerel} \def\widen{\mathrel{\ThisStyle{\stretchrel*{\ooalign{% \raise0.2\LMex\hbox{$\SavedStyle\sqcup$}\cr% \raise-0.2\LMex\hbox{$\SavedStyle\sqcup$}}}{\sqcup}}}} ...


4

Regarding the inputenc question Your example works without problem if I copy it in an utf8-document and declare the inputenc encoding accordingly as utf8. Ditto with ansinew. I can't really imagine how you could get the output in your image -- it can be created but imho not with the standard files. None of them would replace non-ascii chars with question ...


4

If you look at pgfgantt documentation will see that a milestone is not just a symbol but a pgfshape. Therefore you need to replace it with another shape. But luckily, Alain Matthes wrote a shapes.emoticon library in his answer to Something between \frownie and \smiley. Once you have the file tikzlibraryshapes.emoticon.code.tex in your working folder, you'll ...


4

This symbol is called U+21A7 in the Unicode. There are many fonts which support that. You can search for possible symbols on your system by clicking here. With help of this font list, I tried some symbols which were available on my machine (this requires Xe- or LuaLaTeX): % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} ...


4

As I indicated in my comment which the OP acknowledged as an accurate rendition, the symbol can be found online, for example, at http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/23/Doubleflat.svg/681px-Doubleflat.svg.png. To recreate this, a simple negative kern between two \flat symbols (in math mode) was sufficient to achieve the effect. ...


3

elsarticle doesn't support the \thanks command \documentclass{elsarticle} \begin{document} \title{This is a specimen title\tnoteref{t1,t2}} \tnotetext[t1]{This document is a collaborative effort.} \tnotetext[t2]{The second title footnote which is a longer longer than the first one and with an intention to fill in up more than one line while formatting.} ...


3

I don't recognise the image as a sigma. Unicode has three variant lowercase sigmas U+03c2 GREEK SMALL LETTER FINAL SIGMA U+03c3 GREEK SMALL LETTER SIGMA U+03f2 GREEK LUNATE SIGMA SYMBOL which look like ςσϲ or as an image If you are convinced you want the letter shape you drew just save it as a png or (better if you can) a scalable format such ...


3

I think that there are two most sensitive options: increase the first space and make it symmetric: $\langle\,,\rangle$ put \cdots in place of teh arguments: $\langle\cdot,\cdot\rangle$ (this is what I prefer). Typeset versions: In the second one, if you don't like the space after the comma: $\langle\cdot{,}\cdot\rangle$


3

Use $\overleftrightarrow{AB}$ with the mathtools or amsmath packages.


3

Your symbol seems \smallfrown from amssymb, but raised up. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \newcommand{\tieconcat}{% \mathbin{\mathpalette\dotieconcat\relax}% } \newcommand{\dotieconcat}[2]{% auxiliary macro, don't use it directly \text{\raisebox{.8ex}{$\smallfrown$}}% } \begin{document} $A\tieconcat B$ $A\sqcup B$ \end{document} ...


3

A token like \_ in the file name is not allowed, whereas _ is. You can do \newcommand{\namedinclude}[2]{% \subsection{\texttt{#1}}% #2\par \begingroup\def\_{_}% \lstinputlisting{#1}% \endgroup } or \newcommand{\namedinclude}[2]{% \subsection{\texttt{\detokenize{#1}}}% #2\par \lstinputlisting{#1}% } but, in this case, you do ...


3

Well, from your MWE I removed those strange bullets at the end of the code, since you're loading the amsmath package, we can improve the code with it. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[spanish]{babel} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{pgf,tikz} \usetikzlibrary{arrows} ...


2

I didn't see any strange symbol either. Perhaps it is a problem with the encoding of your source file. I suggest a slightly different alignment; with and without (smaller) parentheses around the fractions and a correct definition for absolute value, borrowed from an example in mathtools (it's needless to load amsmath if you load mathtools). ...


2

If you just need \Bowtie from wasysym, you can just define it by looking what's done in the package: \def\Bowtie{\mbox{\wasyfamily\char49}} so you just need to know what \wasyfamily does: \def\wasyfamily{\fontencoding{U}\fontfamily{wasy}\selectfont} So you can avoid loading wasysym by doing, in your document: % a command to access the wasysym font ...


2

this is the kind of job I use to do sometimes. Well, there are few tools you can use for solve this. Maybe the best and automatic way is with pandoc, but sincerely the truth is that I have not tested enough and have not had a satisfactory experience with it yet. Another choice is to do what @Bernard suggests. Formerly I used AbiWord for open doc files and ...


2

One way of placing bars through math characters is to use \ooalign. In the two commands I've defined below, the first number controls how high the bar is on the integral sign, the second controls the length of the bar, and the third controls the thickness of the bar. \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\stI}{% \ooalign{\hidewidth ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible