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14

You are describing the so called Steinmetz notation for complex numbers (or angle notation): the number on the left is the magnitude, the one on the right is the argument of the complex number. You can use the \phase command from the steinmetz package. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{steinmetz} \begin{document} $6\phase{200^\circ}-4\phase{50^\circ}$ ...


13

This is U+25AD (▭) and available as \hrectangle in unicode-math (if using xelatex or lualatex) or stix if using pdflatex (and will be available in other font packages that cover the Unicode math blocks) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stix} \begin{document} $a \hrectangle b $ \end{document}


11

May be this: \documentclass{article} \newcommand\mysym{% \mathrel{% {% \ooalign{\hidewidth$\mkern3mu\circ$\hidewidth\cr$<$}% }% }} \begin{document} \[ x\mysym U\] \end{document}


9

A good occasion for \ooalign, one of the best tricks in my toolbox: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \newcommand{\rectangle}{{% \ooalign{$\sqsubset\mkern3mu$\cr$\mkern3mu\sqsupset$\cr}% }} \begin{document} $S(\rectangle)$ \end{document} Experiment changing 3mu for different ratios between width and height.


9

A tikz solution (as standalone image): \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{xcolor} \usepackage{tikz} \newdimen\pinA \newdimen\pinB \newdimen\pinC \setlength{\pinA}{10mm} \setlength{\pinB}{20mm} \setlength{\pinC}{40mm} \definecolor{pin}{gray}{0} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \useasboundingbox (-\pinB, -\pinC) (\pinB, \pinB); ...


9

Welcome to TeX SE! The key issue is that ebgaramond-maths issues the following \DeclareSymbolFont{letters} {OML} {EBGaramond-Maths} {m} {it} This overwrites the existing letters font. This enables all of the characters which the font does provide and which are used in the OML encoding. However, it does this by telling LaTeX that whenever a maths ...


8

The character ⋸ is the Unicode character U+2278, see Barbara Beeton's comment. I found two math fonts, which contains the charactes: Asana Math XITS Math They can be used with XeTeX or LuaTeX. With package unicode-math, the command is \isinvb, or the character can be given directly as UTF-8 character or the ^^^^-escape notation can be used: ...


8

If you are using XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX you can use the command \faMapMarker from the package fontawesome. Like this: \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{fontawesome} \begin{document} Map Symbol: \faMapMarker \end{document} Output: I'm afraid you have to draw this symbol using pstricks or TikZ, if you can't use XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX for some reason…


8

Sure, as the Haskell code is on GitHub: https://github.com/kirel/detexify Front-End https://github.com/kirel/detexify-hs-backend Back-End https://github.com/kirel/detexify-data Training data However, it is not straight-forward to do so as some of the packages have changed. Additionally, it seems to me that setting a local Haskell server up is not very ...


8

The simplest strategy is to create a PDF file with the Chinese name and including it with \includegraphics as you already do for the signature. I'll use Donald Knuth's Chinese name for the example \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{CJKutf8} \begin{document} \begin{CJK}{UTF8}{gbsn} 高德纳 \end{CJK} \end{document} This uses resources found in TeX Live ...


7

The \downarrow symbol is an extensible delimiter: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\xdownarrow}[1]{% {\left\downarrow\vbox to #1{}\right.\kern-\nulldelimiterspace} } \begin{document} $ \downarrow \big\downarrow \Big\downarrow \bigg\downarrow \Bigg\downarrow \xdownarrow{2cm} $ \end{document}


6

You can use \renewcommand*\div{\mathbin{\mskip1mu\nonscript\mskip-1mu% ∕% \mskip1mu\nonscript\mskip-1mu}} or some value other than 1mu the skip is always added but in non-script (ie text and display) styles add the negative amount to cancel it out.


6

\documentclass[12pt]{report} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \newcommand{\rectangle}{\fboxsep0pt\fbox{\rule{1em}{0pt}\rule{0pt}{1ex}}} \begin{document} $s\rectangle$ \end{document}


6

This is a first approximation: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\ineq}{% \mathrel{\mkern1mu\underline{\mkern-1mu\in\mkern-1mu}\mkern1mu}} \begin{document} $\alpha\ineq\beta$ \end{document} This automatically changes size in subscripts. You may prefer a solution with a roundcap bar below the main symbol: \documentclass{article} ...


6

What you're asking for is an overlapping macro. Either use \rlap (which produces a right overlap): \rlap{?}! or \llap (which produces a left overlap): ?\llap{!} The order of the punctuation ? and ! doesn't really matter, although they have different widths (and therefore may set slightly differently when switched around). The LaTeX2e equivalent is ...


6

A simple application of \ooalign: \documentclass{article} % Simple version if you don't need it in sub/superscripts %\newcommand\gdw{\mathrel{\ooalign{$<$\cr$>$\cr}}} % Fuller version \makeatletter \newcommand{\gdw}{\mathrel{\mathpalette\@gdw@\relax}} \newcommand{\@gdw@}[2]{\ooalign{$\m@th#1<$\cr$\m@th#1>$\cr}} \makeatother \begin{document} ...


5

This is the unicode U+2AA4 named "GREATER-THAN OVERLAPPING LESS-THAN". Here, you may see, which fonts support this symbol and here, which fonts on your system do provide it. The MWE requires Lua- or XeLaTeX. It just shows two fonts I found on my PC. Of course, you should define your preferred version in a \mathrel-command. % arara: lualatex ...


5

Here are two options: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \newcommand{\lbarrow}{\mathrel{{\ooalign{$\rightarrow$\cr\hidewidth$($\hidewidth}}}} \newcommand{\rbarrow}{\mathrel{{\ooalign{$\rightarrow$\cr\hidewidth$)$\hidewidth}}}} \makeatletter \newcommand{\lrparen}[1]{% \settowidth{\@tempdima}{#1}% ...


5

The smallest font should be mathb5 not mathb (error in the original but not triggered in the original document) \documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{amsart} \pagestyle{plain} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{mathb}{\hyphenchar\font45} \DeclareFontShape{U}{mathb}{m}{n}{ <-6> mathb5 <6-7> mathb6 <7-8> mathb7 <8-9> mathb8 <9-10> mathb9 ...


5

The handwriting recognition toolkit (hwrt) is one possibility to classify you recordings. There are still many rough edges and the software gets updated on a daily basis (04.12.2014). The user interface is in a browser and looks like this: The installation is explained in the documentation. If you have trouble or have an idea how to improve it, just leave ...


4

Something like this? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % for \text macro \begin{document} $f\text{\v{}}$ $f\text{\^{}}$ $f\text{\u{}}$ $f\text{\={}}$ $f\text{\.{}}$ $f\text{\"{}}$ \end{document}


4

Whether you use “sign” or “sgn” is a style issue which your intended publisher can answer, not us. That said, you probably want to use AMSMath’s \DeclareMathOperator not \newcommand; see newcommand vs. DeclareMathOperator: … \usepackage{amsmath} \DeclareMathOperator{\sign}{sign} … Depending on the value of $\sign x$, $y$ will take the following values: … ...


4

I would recommend the unicodes U+2A79 and U+2A7A for this, as they are already defined in unicode-math. They are less similar to \sphericalangle and thus easier to distinguish. You need Lua- or XeLaTeX for this. % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} \setmathfont{XITS Math} ...


4

You can define your own command, for example: The code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand\xdownarrow[1][2ex]{% \mathrel{\rotatebox{90}{$\xleftarrow{\rule{#1}{0pt}}$}} } \begin{document} \[ \xdownarrow\quad \xdownarrow[30pt]\quad \xdownarrow[2.5cm] \] \end{document} The default length is 2ex and you ...


4

Several fonts families provide the so called “old style numerals”, besides the crude method of enclosing the number as argument to \oldstylenums For instance, you can load the eco package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{eco} \begin{document} Text numbers 123457890 Math numbers $1234567890$ \end{document} Another font family is Latin Modern via ...


4

Simple Solution This can be accomplished with the xstring package. In particular, the \StrMid{string}{#2}{#3} command allows you to take the substring of string from character positions #2 through #3. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xstring} \newcommand{\myText}[2]{\StrMid{2014/12/20}{#1}{#2}} \begin{document} \myText{1}{4} \end{document} Allowing ...


4

Adjust the amount of lowering (now 0.5ex) to suit your need. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \makeatletter \newcommand\post@accent[2]{% \mbox{\fontsize{#2}{\z@}\selectfont\raisebox{-0.5ex}[\dimexpr\height-0.5ex][0pt]{$\m@th\,#1{}$}}% } \newcommand{\definepostaccent}[2]{% ...


4

A sloppypar will momentarily allow you to overcome the problem. This problem arises for any oversized box that wants to be typeset at the end of a line. The sloppypar feature (or \sloppy for the whole document) changes TeX's penalties to give more emphasis to avoiding margin overruns, at the expense of grossly wide interword spaces. There is no "free ...


4

LaTeX needs to know beforehand that the subsequent text does indeed contain mathematical elements. This is because LaTeX typesets maths notation differently from normal text. Therefore, special environments have been declared for this purpose. Greek letters are commonly used in mathematics, and they are very easy to type in math mode. You just have to type ...


4

\documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \newcommand{\whatzit}{\tikz{\path node[anchor=base,inner sep=0pt](a){$<$} (a.center) +(0pt,.25ex) node[rotate=-30,scale=.6]{$=$};}} \begin{document} Text with \whatzit{} in the middle. \end{document}



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