New answers tagged

6

I think this is the most recent siunitx' manual. Here the word percent appears only five times, and I cannot find permille or similar. A possible answer can be found here, that is, you can put the following declaration in the preamble \DeclareSIUnit\permille{\text{\textperthousand}} and then use it just as the \percent macro of siunitx. ...


1

Another one: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,tipa} \usepackage{xcolor} \newcommand{\AT}{% \hskip-.55cm\vtop{\hsize 1.2cm{\raisebox{.05em}{\rotatebox{-20}% {\Large O }}\hskip-.53cm \textit{A}\textcolor{white}% {\vskip-.405cm\bfseries {\ } \_}\textcolor{white}% {\hskip-.3cm\vskip-.405cm\bfseries {\ } \_}% ...


8

You get what you pay for. I bear no personal responsibility if Hermann Zapf is turning over in his grave. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine} \usepackage{graphicx,xcolor} \def\fauxat{\raisebox{-.35ex}{\stackinset{c}{+.05ex}{c}{-.13ex}{\scalebox{.82}{% \stackunder[.1pt]{\itshape a}{\textcolor{white}{% ...


3

Loading also the bm package should immediately improve the situation. Here's a minimal example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{newtxtext,newtxmath} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{amsmath,bm} \begin{document} \[ \bar{\boldsymbol{\upomega}}= \bar{\mathbf{G}}\dot{\boldsymbol{\theta}} \] \end{document} You can also use the shorthand \bm instead of ...


3

You have several errors in your code: the \chemfig formulae are both missing a closing ) to end the ring. \beta and \delta must be placed in math mode. \text is undefined; you need to load amsmath or amstext. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig,amsmath} \begin{document} \schemestart \chemname ...


4

With \mathpalette trickery we can choose the smaller size. \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\smallsim}{\smallsym{\mathrel}{\sim}} \makeatletter \newcommand{\smallsym}[2]{#1{\mathpalette\make@small@sym{#2}}} \newcommand{\make@small@sym}[2]{% \vcenter{\hbox{$\m@th\downgrade@style#1#2$}}% } \newcommand{\downgrade@style}[1]{% ...


2

You could try {\small \sim}, {\scriptsize \sim} or {\footnotesize \sim} for example. See e. g. What point (pt) font size are \Large etc.? for more font size related commands.


0

If you have issues with stars overlapping with the next column as I did, rewrite David's line of code to read \newcommand{\sym}[1]{{#1}} % for symbols in Table and it'll put the stars in the superscript and pushing the next column on the right over to make space.


2

Use the pifont package. According to the Comprehensive LaTeX Symbol List, page 186, using astrosym symbols is possible. Add this to your preamble: \usepackage{pifont} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{astrosym}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{astrosym}{m}{n}{<-> astrosym}{} Then, you can access the symbols using this command: \Pisymbol{astrosym}{number} number is a ...


2

From revision 2.40 of algorithm2e, it provides \SetKwComment{<cmd>}{<before>}{<after>} which creates the command <cmd>, setting some content <before> and some <after> the comment. You can redefine the way the existing macros function using the above. Here's how \tcp is defined originally: \SetKwComment{tcp}{// }{}% ...


1

You need to provide \\ as a string, not \\, otherwise it would be interpreted as \newline instruction, causing the error about Missing item \documentclass{article} \usepackage[lined,boxed,commentsnumbered]{algorithm2e} \SetKwComment{tcp}{\tiny \string\\}{} \begin{document} \begin{algorithm} \tcp*[l]{ {\tiny Here is my comment.} } \end{algorithm} ...


3

With reference to Left and right subscript, I'd suggest \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\pullback}[2]{{}_{#1}\kern-\scriptspace{\times}_{#2}} \begin{document} See $\pullback{s}{t}$ and then some \ldots \end{document} Using {\times} removes the spacing around \times, thereby changing it from an operator to an ordinary symbol. Minor spacing ...


9

If the engine is Unicode aware and a font is used, which contains the glyph for the private Unicode code point: ^^^^e25f See: The ^^ notation in various engines. This is TeX's method to encode non-ASCII characters with ASCII and can also be used inside command tokens. There are also commands to select a character by slot in the current font: LaTeX ...


2

Is this (by any chance) for a chemical reaction? reaction with chemformula: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemformula} \begin{document} \ch{ A + B -/> C } \end{document} reaction with chemfig: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \schemestart A \+ B \arrow{-/>} C \schemestop \end{document}


2

Just override the declarations with the original one: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathcal}{OMS}{cmsy}{m}{n} \begin{document} $\mathcal{DFIP}_{\mathcal{DFIP}_{\mathcal{DFIP}}}$ \end{document} This is the output of pdffonts, showing that cmsy is used. name type ...


3

Another way of representing the XOR connective is by using a W-like symbol (as in p W q), also used in Set Theory to refer to disjunctive union. Since this symbol does not seem to appear in the Comprehensive LaTeX symbol list, you can create it by joining two "or" connectives together through the following command: \newcommand{\xor}{% \mathbin{% ...


2

there is a \dotplus symbol in the amsfonts collection. insert \usepackage{amssymb} in your preamble. then you can use \dotplus (in math) in the body of your document. amssymb loads amsfonts automatically, so you get access to a lot of other math symbols as well. actually, this question should be considered a duplicate of How to look up a symbol or ...


1

I fought with this problem for two days now and came across this great answer a thousand times before I understood its relevance. Therefore I attempt to reformulate it, stripped to its essence: If you want to write out a literal # into some file, you can do something like \newcommand{\writeouthash}{% \immediate\write\myfile{\string##}% }


3

In order to use \includegraphics you need to add \usepackage{graphicx} in your preamble (at the beginning of your document). And fix the \newcommand{} statement like this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand{\dotplus}{\includegraphics[width=0.2in]{/dotplus.jpg}} \title{} \author{} \date{} \begin{document} \dotplus \end{document}


45

In none of the presented cases you should use \mbox. Phone numbers should use a kern, such as 123\,456\,7890 Things such as p.~210~sq.\@ should use a tie (note the \@ in order not to make the period as a sentence ending one) Names should use ~: Jean de~La~Fontaine (you may want to remove the first ~ if line breaking becomes otherwise unfeasible) Space ...


21

The \mbox is totally unbreakable, i.e., it does not allow hyphenation nor any other breaks. The tilde ~ inserts an unbreakable space, but does not affect the breakability of its left and right neighbours. So in La~Fontaine the Fountaine part can still be hyphenated. So, the tilde is easier to type and to read in the TeX source and it has the other ...


2

Very late answer, but you could also locally set the mathcodes of the letters to the ones plain TeX defines. Then you load the Computer Modern Calligraphic fonts and redefine \mathcal to locally switch to this family and use the “legacy” mathcodes. This solution is superior to the other answer, because you obtain proper scaling of the calligraphic letters ...


1

Use $\Pi$. In this case, math expressions have to be between dollar signs.


1

If one did not prefer T1 encoding, and was using pdflatex, the other option is to use Bruno's \slantbox (Shear transform a "box"). \documentclass{article} \newsavebox\foobox \newcommand{\slantbox}[2][.2]{\mbox{% \sbox{\foobox}{#2}% \hskip\wd\foobox \pdfsave \pdfsetmatrix{1 0 #1 1}% \llap{\usebox{\foobox}}% ...


7

Use the T1 rather than OT1 font encoding: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \begin{document} \S 1 \textit{\S 1} \end{document} In this case, the symbol is taken from the same font as is used for regular text (whatever the current font is - upright, italic, whatever) rather than from a distinct symbol font. This is because T1, unlike OT1, ...


0

use $\ket{\overline{0}}$ to put a overline over the ket 0 basis.


0

This does not look like your picture, but it might be close enough. In fact, in my opinion it's a bit clearer. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \begin{document} $\int \underbrace{f(x)}_{\mbox{Integrand}} d x = \underbrace{F(x)}_{\mbox{Anti-derivative till $f(x)$}} + \overbrace{C}^{\mbox{integration constant}}$ \end{document} Really, using \mbox like I did ...


2

I ended up making my own version (using rotated and shifted versions of \curlywedge) with which I am fairly happy. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{mathabx} \newcommand*\wif{= \joinrel = \joinrel = \mkern-2.3mu \joinrel \mathrel{\raisebox{0.5pt}{\rotatebox[origin=c]{-90}{$\curlywedge$}}} \joinrel ...


2

I suggest you use a combination of \underset/\overset and \substack macros to place the explanatory text and the down/up-arrows below/above their associated formulas. With \substack, you won't have to provide lots of \scriptstyle (or similar) font-sizing instructions. As the second display equation below shows, you may want to introduce linebreaks in some ...


2

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ \int \underset{\underset{\scriptstyle\text{Integrand}}{\scriptstyle\downarrow}}{f(x)} dx = \underset{\underset{\scriptstyle\text{Anti-derivative til } f(x)}{\scriptstyle\downarrow}}{F(x)} + \overset{\underset{\scriptstyle\uparrow}{\scriptstyle\text{Integrasionkonstant}}}{C} \] ...


2

Well, Manuel suggested combining \prec and \succ with \Longleftrightarrow, but the OP was not happy with the appearance of such. I thus took that as a challenge to try to improve the look. I hopefully succeed by stretching the \prec and \succ glyphs horizontally and also trimming off the extra long tips. Then I make it work in all math styles. ...


2

Here is a (non exclusive) list of fonts on CTAN that have this character (it belongs to the series Latin extended additional in the unicode description): Latin Modern –erewhon –Linux Libertine O – ebgaramond – tex-gyre.


1

You may want to look into using either XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX to compile your documents. They support utf8 input encoding natively (in fact, it's the only input encoding they support...). Do also make sure you use a font that features the character ẁ. % Compile with XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX and load a font that contains "ẁ" \documentclass{article} ...


3

The ẁ character is not supported in Latin-1; save your file as UTF-8 and add \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} and also \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{1E81}{\`w} Full example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{1E81}{\`w} \begin{document} Is the character ẁ used in some language? \end{document}


0

I find that { } (\{\} in LateX) is perfectly clear to mathematicians, maybe not to computer scientists. I would use the following: This is obtained with \usepackage{algorithm} \usepackage{algpseudocode} \begin{document} \begin{algorithm}[H] \begin{algorithmic}[1] \State $myset \gets \{\}$ \For{$i = 0\, \textbf{to}\, 4$} ...


2

There are several Greek characters that have different letter forms epsilon: ε or ϵ theta: θ or ϑ kappa: κ or ϰ pi: π or ϖ rho: ρ or ϱ sigma: σ or ς phi: φ or ϕ In the list above, I put first the forms that Unicode classifies as letter, followed by the symbol form; not for sigma, where both shapes are actually used in common writing, the second one in ...


2

If you wanted it to conform to the current font, both in size and style, you could build your own: \documentclass[a2]{article} \usepackage{stackengine,scalerel} \newcommand\NUL{\scalerel*{$\Shortstack[l]{N \phantom{N}U \phantom{NU}L}$}{X}} \begin{document} \LARGE This is \NUL \normalsize This is \NUL \itshape This is \NUL \upshape\ttfamily This is \NUL ...


3

If you are on pdflatex, you can use the ascii package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{ascii} \begin{document} Is this it? \NUL \end{document} You can also input the symbol directly as Unicode, so the code can be portable to XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{ascii} \usepackage{newunicodechar} ...


9

If a TeX engine is used with Unicode/OpenType font support, then it is just a matter to find a font that contains the Unicode code point U+2400, e.g.: % lualatex or xelatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} \def\test#1{#1:&\fontspec{#1}\symbol{"2400}\\} \begin{tabular}{l@{ }l} \test{FreeMono} \test{FreeSans} ...


1

One option that might help you is to place the hat over a phantom character. The phantom character will not be shown, but still takes up space. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} $\hat{~} \hat{b} \hat{\phantom{b}}$ \end{document}


4

Here I put \hat over a hard space, otherwise it takes up no width. Then, I can use \raisebox to lift it higher. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} $a \hat{~} b \raisebox{2pt}{$\hat{~}$} c$ \end{document} To obey the smaller mathstyles, I make the macro \highhat[] that can take a real number as an optional argument, specifying the number of ...


8

Similar to Christian's answer, but siunitx will deal with the correct typesetting, be it text mode or math mode. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[ separate-uncertainty = true, multi-part-units = repeat ]{siunitx} \begin{document} Math mode: $\SI{50 \pm 2}{\percent}$ Text mode: \SI{50 \pm 2}{\percent} \end{document}


11

\pm requires the mathmode, being switched into with $...$. For displaying % use \SI{number}{\percent} rather for better spacing and correct usage of fonts. For text mode, there's \textpm too, this requires textcomp package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{siunitx} \begin{document} $\SI{50}{\percent} \pm \SI{2}{\percent}$ ...


0

Users looking to make common accents in regular text mode can do so with, for example, \'e. MWE: \documentclass[10pt]{article} \begin{document} Alfred Land\'e. \end{document} Output:


0

This approach is both easy and hard (and more trouble than it is worth, in my opinion). Hard because the user has to laboriously catalog the package associated with each symbol in a style file. But easy because each new symbol requires only a single line added to the AddSymbol.sty file, for example, \def\AddSymbolVdash{\RequirePackage{amssymb}}. Then, ...


1

The sign in the picture come from the package bclogo obtain with the command \bcattention.


3

You could load the relsize package and use the \mathlarger macro (once or repeatedly) to enlarge \mathscr{L}. In the third row of the following screenshot, the enlarged \mathscr{L} is generated by two calls to \mathlarger; don't overdo the enlarging stuff. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathrsfs,relsize,array} ...


3

ÔÑã and ÔÇå are Unicode code points, viewed in mac roman encoding: ÔÑã: 0xEF, 0x84, 0x8B -> U+F10B ÔÇå: 0xEF, 0x82, 0x8C -> U+F08C The Unicode block is the private area. Font Awesome uses this area for its symbols: U+F10B: \faMobile or \faicon{mobile} U+F08C: \faLinkedinSquare or \faicon{linkedin-square} \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontawesome} ...


0

This has worked for me: \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \textsterling


2

Geometric shape? Use picture mode! \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{pict2e} \makeatletter \newcommand{\farsquare}[2]{#1\,{\mathpalette\far@square{#2}}} \newcommand{\far@square}[2]{% \mathop{\vcenter{\hbox{% \sbox\z@{$\m@th#1\sum$}% \setlength{\unitlength}{0.9\dimexpr\ht\z@+\dp\z@}% \begin{picture}(1,1) \roundjoin ...



Top 50 recent answers are included