Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

It depends on what you expect a “sans serif dagger” would be. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{textcomp} \newcommand{\sfdagger}{{\sffamily\textdagger}} \newcommand{\sfdaggerdbl}{{\sffamily\textdaggerdbl}} \begin{document} A\sfdagger A\textdagger A\sfdaggerdbl A\textdaggerdbl \end{document} Of course, if the text is already sans serif, there's no ...


2

You can use \renewcommand*\div{\mathbin{\mskip1mu\nonscript\mskip-1mu% ∕% \mskip1mu\nonscript\mskip-1mu}} or some value other than 1mu the skip is always added but in non-script (ie text and display) styles add the negative amount to cancel it out.


12

This is U+25AD (▭) and available as \hrectangle in unicode-math (if using xelatex or lualatex) or stix if using pdflatex (and will be available in other font packages that cover the Unicode math blocks) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stix} \begin{document} $a \hrectangle b $ \end{document}


4

\documentclass[12pt]{report} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \newcommand{\rectangle}{\fboxsep0pt\fbox{\rule{1em}{0pt}\rule{0pt}{1ex}}} \begin{document} $s\rectangle$ \end{document}


8

A good occasion for \ooalign, one of the best tricks in my toolbox: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \newcommand{\rectangle}{{% \ooalign{$\sqsubset\mkern3mu$\cr$\mkern3mu\sqsupset$\cr}% }} \begin{document} $S(\rectangle)$ \end{document} Experiment changing 3mu for different ratios between width and height.


7

The \downarrow symbol is an extensible delimiter: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\xdownarrow}[1]{% {\left\downarrow\vbox to #1{}\right.\kern-\nulldelimiterspace} } \begin{document} $ \downarrow \big\downarrow \Big\downarrow \bigg\downarrow \Bigg\downarrow \xdownarrow{2cm} $ \end{document}


3

You can also draw it with tikz which gives you a lot of flexibility should you desire any customization such as arrow styles, colors, and line styles: Code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{xparse}% So that we can have two optional parameters \NewDocumentCommand\DownArrow{O{2.0ex} O{black}}{% ...


4

You can define your own command, for example: The code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand\xdownarrow[1][2ex]{% \mathrel{\rotatebox{90}{$\xleftarrow{\rule{#1}{0pt}}$}} } \begin{document} \[ \xdownarrow\quad \xdownarrow[30pt]\quad \xdownarrow[2.5cm] \] \end{document} The default length is 2ex and you ...


8

The character ⋸ is the Unicode character U+2278, see Barbara Beeton's comment. I found two math fonts, which contains the charactes: Asana Math XITS Math They can be used with XeTeX or LuaTeX. With package unicode-math, the command is \isinvb, or the character can be given directly as UTF-8 character or the ^^^^-escape notation can be used: ...


6

This is a first approximation: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\ineq}{% \mathrel{\mkern1mu\underline{\mkern-1mu\in\mkern-1mu}\mkern1mu}} \begin{document} $\alpha\ineq\beta$ \end{document} This automatically changes size in subscripts. You may prefer a solution with a roundcap bar below the main symbol: \documentclass{article} ...


3

While it would be possible to get the arrow you want, it's better to use a dedicated package for drawing these diagrams: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{tikz-cd} \begin{document} \begin{tikzcd}[column sep=1.2em] 0 \arrow[r] & C_{3} \arrow[r,hook] & \mathit{SL}_{3}(\mathbb{C}) \arrow[r,two heads] & ...


11

May be this: \documentclass{article} \newcommand\mysym{% \mathrel{% {% \ooalign{\hidewidth$\mkern3mu\circ$\hidewidth\cr$<$}% }% }} \begin{document} \[ x\mysym U\] \end{document}


4

I would recommend the unicodes U+2A79 and U+2A7A for this, as they are already defined in unicode-math. They are less similar to \sphericalangle and thus easier to distinguish. You need Lua- or XeLaTeX for this. % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} \setmathfont{XITS Math} ...


0

Inventing new binary relations is hard on the typesetting :) I can suggest combining it by hand, like the following \newcommand{\lcirc}{<\hspace{-8pt}\circ} $\lcirc$ On the first glance I don't find an existing similar symbol in http://mirrors.ctan.org/info/symbols/comprehensive/symbols-a4.pdf


0

This link shows a way of using \smashoperator[r] in mathtools. \begin{align*} \begin{array}{c} \min \: A = \min \: \smashoperator[r]{\sum_{i\in B}} C_i \\ \\ \min \: D = \min \: \smashoperator[r]{\sum_{i\in B}} \pi_i \cdot F_i \end{array} \end{align*}


0

EPS was designed to import postscript code, which did not include fonts. The necessary fonts had to either be installed on the output device or downloaded with the job. PDF was created to allow pages to stand alone, including embedding fonts. So, when using EPS in publishing, standard practice was to convert any type to outlines when saving (say from ...


2

I would follow egreg's comment, all italic, or all upright. In case it's a special occasion, then don't redefine \pi but define another command. \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmainfont{Minion Pro} \setmonofont{Consolas}[Scale=MatchLowercase] \setmathfont[Scale=MatchLowercase]{TGPagellaMath} ...


6

Well, Private Use Areas are part of Unicode, they just have no predefined meaning. So you can use them like any other character, e.g. by simply typing it (if you have an appropriate input method) or using the character code either as \char"F3A0F or ^^^^^f3a0f. If I run your example here, I get a PDF with the symbol both with LuaTeX and XeTeX.


4

Possibly the pic syntax provides one fairly easy way to go: \documentclass[varwidth, border=5]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \tikzset{symbols/.cd, smiley/.pic={ \draw circle [radius=1/2] (225:1/3) arc (225:315:1/3) (135:1/4) circle [radius=1/32] (45:1/4) circle [radius=1/32]; } } \newcommand\tikzsymbol[2][]{\tikz\pic[#1]{symbols/#2};} ...


5

If you want really curly curly braces and wish to use a Times-like math font -- as would seem to be the case because of your consideration of the newtxmath package -- you should look into using the mtpro2 font package. ("mtpro2" is short for "MathTime Professional II".) The full mtpro2 package isn't free of charge. However, its "lite" subset, which is all ...


-1

○ as is used for (f ○ g)(x) is Alt+9. I just posted this so if someone needed it, it was here.


2

The glyphs are not supported by Libertine in TS1 encoding. Why? I don't know. However in the log file you find Missing character: There is no <B4> in font LinLibertineT-tlf-ts1! Missing character: There is no <80> in font LinLibertineT-tlf-ts1! Missing character: There is no <80> in font LinLibertineT-tlf-ts1! Missing character: There is ...


2

I do not know a package which defines the most common currency signs. I would just search a font which has them all. You may want to search the unicode of the existing symbols first: http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/category/Sc/list.htm Here is the Turkish symbol with use of its unicode (and siunitx): % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} ...


3

The musixtex package provides a font (in five sizes and only one variant) which has the symbol (instead of a »3«). Here is one possibility to use it in text: \documentclass{article} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{musix}{}% \DeclareFontShape{U}{musix}{m}{n}{% <-12> musix11 <12-15> musix13 <15-18> musix16 <18-23> musix20 <23-> ...


3

There is a unicode for this and here are the four fonts I could find to set this: % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} A{\fontspec{code2001_0.ttf}\symbol{"1D12B}}B{\fontspec{freeserif.ttf}\symbol{"1D12B}}D{\fontspec{quivira.otf}\symbol{"1D12B}}E{\fontspec{symbola.ttf}\symbol{"1D12B}} \end{document} ...


0

Some more free available versions: % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} Script Capital H: {\fontspec{arialuni.ttf}\symbol{"210B}} {\fontspec{code2000.ttf}\symbol{"210B}} {\fontspec{dejavusans.ttf}\symbol{"210B}} {\fontspec{freeserif.otf}\symbol{"210B}} ...


1

You can get something very similar to what Mico showed using \mathscr{H} and mathrsfs, which is free. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \begin{document} $\mathscr{H}$ \end{document}


2

The H produced by the \mathscr macro of the MathTime Pro 2 Professional font package -- note that it's not free of charge -- may (or may not...) be what you're looking for: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[mtpscr]{mtpro2} % http://www.pctex.com/mtpro2.html \begin{document} $\mathscr{H}$ \end{document} Many more possibilities present themselves if ...


0

You could think of ${\overline A}_1$ as being defined as $\overline{A_1}$ in which case you have the shorter line and can just write \overline A_1.


1

Certainly something like $\overline{A_1}$, because it is closure of $A_1$. But I understand, that the rule may look a bit too long for you. Indeed, there is no italic correction for math font. If you prefer a bit shorter version, see, e.g. answers to Appearance issues with \bar{} and \underline{}.


9

Here are some possibilities: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} $x^{*2}\quad x^{*\,2}\quad {x^{*}}^{2}\quad (x^{*})^{2}$ \end{document} I'd prefer the last one that's less ambiguous.


6

This should do (not in script styles) \documentclass{article} \makeatletter \newcommand\tint{\mathop{\mathpalette\tb@int{t}}\!\int} \newcommand\bint{\mathop{\mathpalette\tb@int{b}}\!\int} \newcommand\tb@int[2]{% \sbox\z@{$\m@th#1\int$}% \if#2t% \rlap{\hbox to\wd\z@{% \hfil \vrule width .35em height \dimexpr\ht\z@+1.4pt\relax depth ...


4

\documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{kpfonts} \def\uppartial{{\mathversion{sf}\ensuremath{\partialup}}} \begin{document} $\partial$ partial derivative symbol in \LaTeX \sffamily \uppartial{} partial derivative symbol in \LaTeX \end{document} You can also use \usepackage[partialup]{kpfonts} if you do not need the default version. ...


2

I thought this question has come up before, but maybe not. How about something like $\overline{\kern-2pt\int}\underline{\kern2pt{\!\int\!}}$ $\overline{\!\int}\underline{\>{\!\int\!}}$ \bye Or this one $\eqalign{\bar{\kern-2pt{\!\!\int\!{}}}\quad\underline{\kern-2pt{\int\!\!\!}}}$ \bye


5

How about using cmbright to get sans serif math and rotating the \partial? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{cmbright} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand{\upartial}{\rotatebox[origin=c]{15}{\ensuremath{\partial\mkern-2mu}}} \begin{document} \[\frac{\partial x}{\partial t}\quad\textnormal{vs.}\quad\frac{\upartial x}{\upartial t}\] \end{document} Edit: ...


9

Partial solution. \usepackage{graphicx} \renewcommand*\partial{\textsf{\reflectbox{6}}}


5

There are thousands of fonts and a good number of those have a S sign, it's hard to know what to suggest, here's a few... \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{tgpagella} \usepackage{tgbonum} \DeclareMathSymbol{\dd}{\mathalpha}{letters}{`$} \begin{document} \showoutput \[ \$ \textit{\fontfamily{cmr}\selectfont\$} ...


5

The different 'sizes' for fonts in math-mode are: \displaystyle \textstyle \scriptstyle \scriptscriptstyle If you want to change their value, you could do: \DeclareMathSizes{d-size}{t-size}{s-size}{ss-size} In your example, I would just define a new command for your subscript: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} ...


3

It's - 9 as 99 as ” - 6 as 66 as “ Well, the font here isn't quite showing it, on wikipedia, better ones can be found:


1

I would try with $^{a}/_{b}$, or, based in your example $^{\mathcal{O}_{(V',0)}}/_{\mathcal{O}_{(V,0)}}$ Also it is possible to do $^{a}\Big/_{b}$.


3

The easiest version of course is just to use $f''(x)$ as egreg mentioned in comments. This is supported by pdfLaTeX and really easy to type. The prime, double prime, and triple prime have their own unicodes U+2032, U+2033, and U+2034 which you could address with help of the package fontspec via \symbol{"2032}.... This will require Xe- or LuaLaTeX. ...


4

tabular only needs to be in a table environment if you want the table to be able to float in the document. If you want the table exactly where you placed it then you don't need to use table environment at all. The {|c|>{$}c<{$}|} is making the second column to automatically be in math mode. That is why you needed \text and could say 48.17 \pm 0.25 ...


2

I find this way is very convenient: package: \usepackage[frenchb]{babel} in text: \og text \fg{}


3

Here are some possibilities with the use of unicode (just as a demonstrative addition to Adam's answer). The Unicode for this symbol is U+22C7. % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{unicode-math} \begin{document} ...


7

The symbol you need to use is produced by the following command: \divideontimes


1

Build your own. The parameters \rlwd and \rldp can be changed, as well as the 1pt underset gap. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{calc,stackengine} \def\rlwd{.5pt} \def\rldp{.3ex} \def\underframe#1{\stackunder[1pt]{#1}{\rule[-\rldp]{\rlwd}{\rldp}\kern-\rlwd% \rule{\widthof{#1}}{\rlwd}\kern-\rlwd\rule[-\rldp]{\rlwd}{\rldp}}} \begin{document} This is a ...


6

Those symbols are in IPA: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tipa} \begin{document} \textsubbridge{t}\quad \textyogh\quad \textesh\quad \textdyoghlig\quad \textteshlig \end{document} For the last one you might prefer \texttoptiebar{t\textesh} The characters are available in some OpenType fonts, for example FreeSerif. Compile the following with ...


6

One way is to include the amsmath package after tipa: Loading tipa after amsmath results in errors Command \; invalid in math mode The reason for this is that tipa redefines \; for its own purposes. So if your document needs both math and tipa functionality you have two options: a. Use safe mode: \usepackage[safe]{tipa} which disables these ...


3

If you are able to use Lua- or XeLaTeX, you might want to use the unicode U+A757 for this. Just look for a font which supports this symbol and load it like in my MWE: % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{EB Garamond} \usepackage{mathtools} \newcommand*{\qbar}{\ensuremath{\text{\symbol{"A757}}}} \begin{document} ...



Top 50 recent answers are included