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2

With the babel package loaded there is \babelhyphen{nobreak} available (alongside \babelhyphen{soft}, \babelhyphen{hard} and a few others). While it prohibits a break after the dash the following word may still be hyphenated: $n$\babelhyphen{nobreak}dimensional The language ngerman (maybe others, too) defines a shorthand for a non-breaking hyphen: "~. ...


8

If you use the amsmath package, you could employ its \nobreakdash macro to insert a dash or en-dash after which no line break is allowed. Three examples (all from the user guide of the amsmath package): $p$\nobreakdash-adic $n$\nobreakdash-dimensional pages 1\nobreakdash--9 Basically, where you'd normally write - ("dash") in the input file, you would ...


10

A TikZ solution with works in different sized for both math and text mode. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{shapes.geometric} \makeatletter \newcommand*{\trinum}{} \DeclareRobustCommand*{\trinum}[1]{% \ensuremath{% \mathpalette\@trinum{#1}% }% } \newdimen\trinum@sep \newdimen\trinum@rule \newcommand*{\@trinum}[2]{% % #1: ...


10

Magic of \ooalign: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand{\trinum}[1]{\mathpalette\dotrinum{#1}} \newcommand{\dotrinum}[2]{{% \vphantom{\triangle}% \ooalign{% $#1\triangle$\cr\hidewidth\scaleraise{$#1#2$}\hidewidth\cr }% }} \newcommand{\scaleraise}[1]{% \raisebox{.2\height}{\scalebox{0.5}{#1}}% } \begin{document} Works fine ...


2

Or the Heiko Oberdiek version... contains a lot of logos you might need. % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{hologo} \begin{document} \hologo{AmSLaTeX} \end{document} Or you just type: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lmodern} \begin{document} $\cal A$\kern-.1667em\lower.5ex\hbox{$\cal M$}\kern-.125em$\cal S$-\TeX \end{document} ...


2

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \AmS-\LaTeX \end{document}


3

Try: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} Short version: \AmS-\LaTeX\par Manual version: \makeatletter {\AmSfont A\kern -.1667em\lower .5ex\hbox {M}\kern -.125emS}-L\kern -.36em{\sbox \z@ T\vbox to\ht \z@ {\hbox {\check@mathfonts \fontsize \sf@size \z@ \math@fontsfalse \selectfont A}\vss }}\kern -.15emT\kern -.1667em\lower ...


3

Based on @HarishKumar comment here goes the solution Define the following commands before \begin{document}, i.e. for a 卍 gammadion \newcommand{\agni}[1]{ \begin{tikzpicture}[#1] \draw (-1,1) -- (0,1) -- (0,-1) -- (1,-1); \draw (-1,-1) -- (-1,0) -- (1,0) -- (1,1); \end{tikzpicture} } and for a 卐 gammadion ...


5

Completely new update: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \AtBeginDocument{\providecommand*\colonequiv{\vcentcolon\mspace{-1.2mu}\equiv}} \begin{document} \[A\colonequiv B\] %\[A\coloneqq B\] % for prove of consistency %\[A\coloneq B\] \end{document} Old version (I believe, misunderstood): Super hacky, but it works: ...


4

This implements Barbara Beeton's suggestion without loading the stix package: \documentclass{article} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{stixbbit}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{stixbbit}{m}{it}{<-> stix-mathbbit}{} \DeclareRobustCommand{\stixdanger}{% {\usefont{U}{stixbbit}{m}{it}\symbol{"F6}}% } \begin{document} This is the \stixdanger{} symbol. \end{document}


2

Following @barbarabeeton comment, a stix version writes: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stix} \begin{document} $\danger$ \end{document}


2

Here is a way to draw n-bonds (n>1) with chemfig: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \usetikzlibrary{decorations.markings} \makeatletter \tikzset{nbond/.style args={#1}{% draw=none,% decoration={% markings,% mark=at position 0 with {\coordinate (CFstart@) at (0,0);}, mark=at position 1 with {% ...


3

Find its unicode, see the fonts which support it, search your system for available fonts and do (Lua- or XeLaTeX needed): % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} \fontspec{code2000.ttf}\symbol{"2621} \fontspec{quivira.otf}\symbol{"2621} % or very dangerous... \fontspec{symbola.ttf}\symbol{"2621} \end{document}


7

A TikZ version with the height of a "Z". Width, height, rotation angle, line thickness, ... can easily be changed. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \tikz[ line cap=but, line join=round, x=.5em, very thick, y=1*(height("Z")-\pgflinewidth)*(1-sin(10)), rotate=-10, rounded corners=1.5pt, ]\draw (1, 0) -- (0, 0) -- (1, ...


3

Depending on your needs this is rather straight-forward with the chemformula package and a little TikZ: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemformula} \NewChemBond{quadruple}{ \foreach \i in {-.15em,-.05em,.05em,.15em}{ \draw[chembond] ([yshift=\i]chemformula-bond-start) -- ([yshift=\i]chemformula-bond-end) ; } } \NewChemBond{quintuple}{ ...


2

The .ttf version of the font Mayfair can be downloaded here. You will have to use Lua- or XeLaTeX in order to get it running, though. % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{mathtools} \newcommand*{\myV}{\text{{\fontspec{Mayfair.ttf}V}}} \usepackage{amssymb} \begin{document} Here is your desired inline math: ...


2

A version with \mathcal: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb}% for \mathbb \begin{document} $ \mathcal{V} \subset \mathbb{R}^3 $ \end{document} The shape of the symbol depends on the font. An example with mathptmx (Times): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb}% for \mathbb ...


4

The character bounding box of \Box is wrong, the height is too low, when latexsym is used as package to get the symbol: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,latexsym} \begin{document} \setlength{\fboxsep}{0pt} \setlength{\fboxrule}{.1pt} \[ \fbox{$\Box$} \fbox{$\hat\Box$} \fbox{$\tilde\Box$} \] \begin{align*} \Box &= \sum_a \partial^a\partial_a ...


3

You can use cancel package. \documentclass[a4paper,10pt]{scrartcl} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb,cancel} \begin{document} What part of \begin{align*} \mathcal{L} &= - \frac{1}{4} F_{\mu \nu} F^{\mu \nu} \\ &\phantom{{}=}+ i \bar{\psi} \cancel{D} \psi + h.c. \\ &\phantom{{}=}+ \bar{\psi}_i y_{ij} \psi_j \phi + h.c. \\ ...


1

You can also play with the \fboxsep length. \documentclass[border=.1in]{standalone} \setlength{\fboxrule}{2pt} \begin{document} \fbox{T} \fbox{PCR} \fbox{\makebox[.5in]{wide}} \fbox{\hspace{1em}wider\hspace{1em}} baseline text. \end{document} You can create a double box by slightly overlapping two boxes. The \vphantom is used to force both boxes to ...


13

It's Unicode symbol U+22F9 "Element of with two horizontal strokes": ⋹. When LuaTeX or XeTeX is used, then the symbol is available with the following fonts: Asana Math \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmathfont{Asana-Math.otf} \begin{document} \[ A \isinE B \] \end{document} XITS Math \setmathfont{xits-math.otf} The ...


6

This uses a stack, and will work in all mathstyles. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,stackengine,scalerel} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand\Inn{\def\stackalignment{c}\def\stacktype{L}\ThisStyle{\mathrel{% \stackon[0pt]{$\SavedStyle\subset$}{\scalebox{0.86}[1]{$\SavedStyle=$}}}}% } \begin{document} \[ A\in B \] \[ A\Inn B\quad \scriptstyle ...


13

Here's one option using \ooalign: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand\Inn{% \mathrel{\ooalign{$\subset$\cr\hfil\scalebox{0.8}[1]{$=$}\hfil\cr}}% } \begin{document} \[ A\in B \] \[ A\Inn B \] \end{document} The result: And if you need it for the different math styles: \documentclass{article} ...


3

You could use \overrightarrow: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ \overrightarrow{\dim} , \quad \overrightarrow{\text{dimension}} \] \end{document} This and further alternatives can be found at the LaTeX-Community forum in the topic Extended Vector Arrow. So there are nice arrows with esvect: \documentclass{article} ...


7

A solution with TikZ: The size adapts to the current math style. The example uses the size of letter A. The line width decreases with smaller line styles. Full example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \makeatletter \newcommand*{\twohalfcircle}[2]{% \ensuremath{% \mathord{% change accordingly to the symbol type ...


15

An answer on stackoverflow contains the following "official specification": The following example implements this in pgf. The side bearings are unspecified. The example uses 75 % of the line width for the side bearings. The image shows the letter P, the Russian ruble and the Russian ruble in a box to show its bounding box. \documentclass{article} ...


17

If you can use either XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX and can make use of a font that provides the required symbol, you could proceed as in the following example. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{PT Sans} % per Unicode, the 'ruble' symbol is in slot U+20BD \newcommand\ruble{\char"20BD } \begin{document} \textyen\ruble\textdollar ...


16

Brew your own, made scalable. If the default sans font changes, some adjustments may be needed to the measurements. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine} \def\Ruble{\stackengine{.64ex}{% \stackengine{.4ex}{\textbf{\textsf{P}}}{\rule{1ex}{.16ex}\kern.55ex}{O}{r}{F}{F}{L}% }{\rule{1ex}{.16ex}\kern.55ex}{O}{r}{F}{F}{L}\kern-.1ex} ...


25

You can use fontawesome and \faRub: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{fontawesome} \begin{document} \faRub \end{document}


3

If the symbols are used before they are defined, then the definitions must go into the .aux file. In comparison to my answer for question "List of Symbols?", I have now split \new@symb in two parts. \new@symb writes the definition in the .aux file and sets the \label. It also defines the symbol, if it was not yet read from the .aux file. ...


9

Alright, let me answer properly the question "What should this piece of LaTeX do?" \documentclass[a4paper,11pt]{article} This begins the preamble. Put very simply, the document class sets your document up for you. It defines all of the basic instructions to set out the page, as well as providing simple LaTeX commands. So, the document class takes care of ...


4

The code \DeclareMathSymbol{\bot}{\mathord}{symbols}{"3F} \DeclareMathSymbol{\perp}{\mathrel}{symbols}{"3F} is drawn from fontmath.ltx and it shows how the same symbol can be used in two different meanings. Both \bot and \perp use the character in slot "3F (in hexadecimal, decimal value is 63) of the math font with internal name symbols. However, \bot ...


3

A sample code, involving math, is: \documentclass[a4paper,11pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % declares a predefined package for math \begin{document} %starts document Some words % some words \begin{align} %starts a formula block \sum_{n=1}^{\infty} \frac{x^{n}}{n} = - \ln(1-x) % a known formula \end{align} %ends formula block more words. ...


1

I suggest to use logical markup with a command \meansymbol, which is set to \mu here, which prints the usual italic version of the greek letter mu. This way, it's easy to make a consistent notation throughout the document. Additionally, I provided the upshape version, \upmu in the \meanupsymbol -- this requires \usepackage{upgreek} then. (Of course, \upmu ...


2

Use showstringspaces=false; either globally (for all your listings): \documentclass{article} \usepackage[dvipsnames]{xcolor} \usepackage{listings} \lstset{ showstringspaces=false, language=C++, keywordstyle=\color{RedViolet}, stringstyle=\color{blue}, commentstyle=\color{ForestGreen}, morecomment=[l][\color{Orange}]{\#}, } ...


3

LaTeX provides, as any new user finds out, support for greek letters in math mode, with macro names that are spelled out: \alpha, \beta, \delta, etc. Unfortunately, the default appearance of \epsilon is which is not what the OP was seeking. However, one finds on p.43 of Lamport's LaTeX User Guide that several greek letters have variants that are ...


3

One possibility is to use an em-dash: The code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{booktabs} \usepackage{bbding} \begin{document} \noindent \begin{tabular}{lcc} \toprule & ObjectA & ObjectB \\ \midrule Attribute1 & \Checkmark & --- \\ Attribute2 & --- & \Checkmark \\ Attribute3 & \Checkmark & --- \\ \bottomrule ...


4

\textellipisis is defined via \DeclareTextCommandDefault{\textellipsis}{% .\kern\fontdimen3\font .\kern\fontdimen3\font .\kern\fontdimen3\font} So by default places three . from the current font but that is only a default, it is an encoding specific command and if the encoding supplies a character eg U+2026 in unicode encodings, then that may be ...


10

The difference between \textellipsis and \ldots is, that the latter can also be used in math mode. It is defined as (from latex.ltx): \DeclareRobustCommand{\dots}{% \ifmmode\mathellipsis\else\textellipsis\fi} \let\ldots\dots Therefore, the commands produce the same output in text mode. Package ellipsis makes the space configurable via the macro ...


1

Sometimes I get such errors due to corrupted auxiliary files, e.g. a truncated *.aux or such due to killing pdflatex. Other source can be "invisible" garbage in the file, which can be e.g. control characters that snuck in, or even some hilarity like a terminal escape that goes back and overwrites some junk with spaces. Another possibility is that you have ...


0

My assumption is that the wrong input file is used. Instead of the source file, LaTeX is given a binary file, like a PDF file, for example. Another option is a wrong encoding. There is some support for UTF-8. But UTF-16 and UTF-32 are not supported. The added zero bytes also cause these kind of error. When TeX is running, it generates a file with extension ...



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