New answers tagged

7

Don't use % if you want to write the % character directly. The % character is reserved to indicate a comment after which everything is ignored. This is no problem at the end of a line, but the % should not occur in between, say, $ 11 % $, because this way TeX has entered math mode which is not correctly closed (unless there's a stray $ following in one of ...


2

Here is a \uhref command for selectively underlining the text: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{etoolbox} \usepackage{hyperref} \makeatletter \newif\ifunderlinehref \DeclareRobustCommand{\uhref}{\underlinehreftrue\href} \patchcmd{\hyper@link@} {{\Hy@tempb}{#4}} {{\Hy@tempb}{\ifunderlinehref\underline{#4}\else#4\fi}} {}{} \apptocmd{\hyper@link@} ...


2

Well, one way to fix the problem is to change the position of the \underline so that it is placed within the second argument of the href. The answer, then, becomes: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{hyperref} \begin{document} 1 (without \#, link, underlined) = \underline{\href{http://the-best-URL-in-the-world_without-a-number-sign}{URL without number ...


2

The Comprehensive Symbol Guide is your flexible friend concerning lookup of thousands of symbols: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} $\bot\bot\bot$ \end{document}


1

Try using ntheorem and the nonumberplaintheorem style. The placement of endmarks is automatic (even if the environment ends up in displayed equations). Here is a possible code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage[thmmarks, amsmath, ...


0

Well, if I understand your question right, then you want to add a second author to the paper. Your given MWE is not complete, you missed for example command \maketitle to create the title sequence for the paper. Command \thanks includedes a footnote (with the asterix), so if you do not want it just comment is out (as I did in the following MWE) or just ...


0

If you were using this type of construction extensively you could define a notation such as \begin{equation} \left.\sqrt{(a_k+(-1)^{p_k}(}\right\vert_{k=1}^n=\sqrt{(a_1+(-1)^{p_1}\sqrt{(a_2+(-1)^{p_2}\sqrt{(\cdots+\sqrt{a_n}}}} \end{equation} MathJax is unable to handle the LaTeX so I have uploaded the image.


4

Add \usepackage{enumitem} to customize the labels. All the label syntax used below come from existing existing answers. To display a caret, preface it with \string. For the $, preface it with \ and for ], preface with \char. For the backslash, \textbackslash works here. \documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{enumitem} ...


5

The symbol drawn with pgf. The size (\SectorRadius), the angle (\SectorHalfAngle), and the line width (\SectorLineWidth) can be configured: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pgf} \newcommand*{\SectorRadius}{1ex} \newcommand*{\SectorHalfAngle}{45} \newcommand*{\SectorLineWidth}{.4pt} \newcommand*{\sector}{% \begin{pgfpicture} ...


10

Package amsmath uses \Longrightarrow to get the \Implies symbol. \Longrightarrow and \Longleftarrow are composed symbols with the standard fonts (unless a math font is used, which contain ready glyphs for the symbol). The arrow is taken from \Rightarrow and \Leftarrow, the equals sign = is used as prolongation, see macro \Relbar. At larger font sizes, the ...


3

You can find a font that has that Unicode symbol (see the list at http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/2314/fontsupport.htm), install it as a system font, load it using fontspec, and put that symbol directly in your .tex file. Compile with XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX instead of pdfLaTeX. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Cambria} ...


1

Ok, the problem was font Fontin doesn't support Croatian letters. I tried one that I was sure supports (like Andada-Regular) and it worked. Thank you very much. On the page https://www.fontsquirrel.com you can filter fonts by languages that they support and download them.


17

\usepackage{MnSymbol} I just searched The Comprehensive LaTeX Symbol List and found it.


1

Maybe the problem is the spacing when used in formulas? Look here: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \begin{document} a :- b $a :- b$ $a \mathop{:-} b$ $a \mathop{:\!-} b$ $a \mathop{:\!\!-} b$ %% suggested by Steven B. Seaglets $a \mathop{\vcenter{\hbox{$:$}}-} b$ \end{document}


20

This is an implementation using pict2e; the angle is 40 degrees. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pict2e} \makeatletter \DeclareRobustCommand{\sector}{\mathord{\mathpalette\make@sector\relax}} \newcommand{\make@sector}[2]{% \settoheight{\unitlength}{$#1x$}% \begin{picture}(1,1.06) \linethickness{.08\unitlength} \moveto(0.5,0) \lineto(0.842,1) ...


17

There is a symbol from the fdsymbol package called \sector. Also, depending on your level of desperation, you might want to look through The Comprehensive LATEX Symbol List.


1

This seems to be a recently introduced bug in MikTeX, present at least in 2.9.5870. The example works after installing MikTeX 2.9.5550 (using the currently latest ProTeXT installer). A hack to make it work The example also works when you start from MikTeX 2.9.5550, and then update all packages except miktex-metafont-bin and miktex-mfware-bin. I did not try ...


2

A TikZ solution: The symbol is drawn by filling a path with three rectangles. Because of the even odd fill rule, the middle part remains empty/white. The height of the symbol is the height of uppercase letters. The outer "line width" is 0.4 pt, independent on the font size, the inner rectangle is set at 75% of the outer rectangle, dependent on the ...


3

I know of no font available with (pdf)latex that provides that shape, WHITE DIAMOND CONTAINING BLACK SMALL DIAMOND. On the other hand, it's not really difficult to build it. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pict2e} \DeclareRobustCommand{\wdcbsd}{% \begingroup \setlength{\unitlength}{\fontcharht\font`T}% \begin{picture}(1,1) ...


1

U25C8 is the unicode no of this character (category Geometric shapes). Its name is ‘WHITE DIAMOND CONTAINING BLACK SMALL DIAMOND’. On this site, you can find a list of fonts which contain this symbol. You can use them with XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX. Edit It seems the packages MnSymbol and fdsymbol each have a \diamonddiamond symbol which looks very much like ...


19

Symbol from Unicode font (LuaTeX or XeTeX) If LuaTeX or XeTeX is used with Unicode fonts, then the symbol can be used directly if the font supports this code point. Example for some fonts: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} \newcommand*{\test}[1]{% #1:&\fontspec{#1}\symbol{"262D}\\% } \begin{tabular}{ll} \test{DejaVu Sans} ...


2

I've just added this functionality to the text search of write-math.com. See for ∅ (link):


1

The definition of \NBSP is % ascii.sty, line 90: \def\NBSP{{\asciifamily\char"A0}\xspace} and this implies that \NBSP will definitely not work in math mode. Indeed, if you try it, you'll see, in the .log file Missing character: There is no <A0> in font cmr10! Without $'s it works: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{ascii} \begin{document} ...


3

The problem you are having is due to the fact that tipa redefines basic letters within its IPA environment, which is triggered by \textipa{...}, {\tipaencoding...}, or \begin{IPA}...\end{IPA} (see section 3.2.1 of the tipa manual). As you can see on p. 44 of the manual, a capital V within the IPA environment is typeset as ʋ: This capital letter problem is ...


1

\={\*V} \u{\*V} If you would like to continue using tipa, you can use the command \* to get tipa to print a literal capital letter, instead of reading it as a short cut. For example, as you know, V in the IPA environment is a shorthand for \textscriptv To get an actual V, we have \*V: \begin{IPA} \*V \textbf{\*V} \textsl{\*V} \={\*V} \end{IPA}


1

The versatim.tex file was put by error in  doc\latex\apl\. Move it to \tex\latex\apl\. As to the problem of the metric file, you can create a new one with the following command line: mf \mode=localfont ; input cmapl10 This produces 3 files: cmapl10.log, cmapl.600gf and cmapl10.tfm. Delete the first two and move the tfm file into ...


2

With package pdfrender a stroked font can be simulated. The following example uses the file from egreg's answer, but replaces \hollowcolon by a stroked version of the colon without using a different font. Despite its name, \textrender changes the rendering of the current font, it does not change or switch fonts and can also be used inside math. ...


7

⦂ The symbol “⦂” is \typecolon which you can find the in stix package. \usepackage{stix} ... $$ X^\mu (z, \bar z) X^\nu (z', \bar z') = \typecolon X^\mu (z, \bar z) X^\nu (z', \bar z') \typecolon $$ However, stix will change the math font. We could extract just this symbol using the trick from How to use only selected math symbols of the STIX ...


2

The symbol has a Unicode code point: U+A751 LATIN SMALL LETTER P WITH STROKE THROUGH DESCENDER There are some (at least) text fonts, which do provide the symbol. Example for LuaTeX/XeTeX: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{booktabs} \usepackage{fontspec} \newfontfamily\DejaVuSans{DejaVu Sans} \newcommand*{\Rows}{} \makeatletter ...


2

The width of the bar is 9mu, so we need such amount of back up. Here's a version that works also in sub/superscripts and has no spacing issues. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \makeatletter \DeclareRobustCommand{\pbar}{\mathord{% \text{$\m@th\mkern-2mu\raisebox{-1.5ex}[0pt][0pt]{$\mathchar'26$}\mkern-7mu p$}% }} \makeatother ...


8

The fdsymbol font provides a suitable \smallcirc symbol, but it needs to be scaled. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{FdSymbolA}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{FdSymbolA}{m}{n}{ <-> s*[.28] FdSymbolA-Regular }{} \DeclareSymbolFont{fdsymbol}{U}{FdSymbolA}{m}{n} \DeclareMathSymbol{\smallcirc}{\mathord}{fdsymbol}{"60} ...


7

Here I do it with a scaled stack. Works in all math styles. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine,scalerel} \newcommand\textaltcolon{\ensurestackMath{\stackon[1.5ex]{\circ}{\circ}}} \newcommand\altcolon{\savestack\Tmp{\raisebox{-.7pt}{$\textaltcolon$}}% \dp\Tmpcontent=\dimexpr\dp\Tmpcontent-.7pt\relax% \mathrel{\scalerel*{\Tmp}{:}}} ...


3

Something similar has been defined by @egreg in this post. But here is a customized command: \newcommand{\pbar}{\lower1.5ex\hbox{$\mathchar'26$}\mkern-6mu p} Here is mwe: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\pbar}{\lower1.5ex\hbox{$\mathchar'26$}\mkern-6mu p} \begin{document} $\pbar$ {\large$\pbar$} {\huge$\pbar$} \end{document} Here is another take ...


4

It may or may not be to your taste...for example, the slanted + is not the same slant as the \mathcal{H} legs; but it works in all math styles. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,trimclip,scalerel} \def\dblHtextstyle{\clipbox{0pt 0pt 4pt 0pt}{$\mathcal{H}$}\smash{ \kern-1pt\scalebox{.75}[1.06]{\raisebox{.450pt}{\textsl{\sffamily +}}}\kern-5.15pt ...


5

Are you thinking to something like this? \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\plusdots}{% \mathbin{% \sbox0{$+$}% \vcenter{\baselineskip=.3\wd0 \lineskiplimit=0pt \hbox to \wd0{\hss.\hss} \hbox to \wd0{.\hss.\hss.} \hbox to \wd0{\hss.\hss} }% }% } \begin{document} \[ a+b\plusdots c \] \end{document}


5

\newcommand*\recnrm[1]{\left[\!\left]#1\right[\!\right]} It's a first step, that can be “tweaked” but the important part is that you use a command \recnrm{x} or \recnrm{\frac{A}{B}}. Then you can change the definition later.


-1

You can just put in your .bib file as: {{\AA}}, it will display angstrom symbol in capital A.


4

The \sqrt command takes as a mandatory argument what's to be extracted the square root of. So the correct syntax is \sqrt{a+b} not \sqrt(a+b). Your problem is solved by using Q^*=\sqrt{\frac{2K\lambda}{h}} If you need the cube root (or other roots), there's the optional argument: \sqrt[3]{a} In a previous version of your question you had ...


7

Working from Akiiino's answer I came up with this, which also works in display mode \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand{\dotriangle}[1]{% \raisebox{-.7ex}{$\vcenter{#1\kern.2ex\hbox{$\triangle$}\kern.2ex}$}% } \newcommand{\tripow}[3]{% Syntax: \tripow{#1}{#2}{#3} gives you #1 ^ {#2} = #3 \mathop{% We want it to an ...


2

The screenshot you've posted suggests you're interested in Times Roman-based Fonts. If that's the case, I suggest you load the newtxtext and newtxmath packages. The latter package, happily, provides "upright" lowercase Greek math symbols. They may be accessed by prefixing "up" to the macro for the ordinary symbol (e.g., \upalpha, \upbeta, etc.). To typeset ...


3

Try the upgreek package and \boldsymbol from amsmath (or mathtools. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{upgreek} \begin{document} \begin{align} x'_{0} &= \gamma \left( x_{0} - \boldsymbol{\upbeta \cdot x}\right) \\ \boldsymbol{x}' &= \boldsymbol{x} + \dfrac{\gamma-1}{\boldsymbol{\upbeta}^2} \left( \boldsymbol{\upbeta ...


4

After some tinkering with the variants, I've come up with this: \newcommand{\PowerTriangle}[3]{ \mathop{\vphantom{\triangle}}_{#1}\hspace{-0.17em}{\stackrel{#2}{\triangle}}_{#3}} The subscripts are a bit lower than in the original post and it looks better in my opinion.


3

I've attempted to create a command which will typeset the "Triangle of Power" in a nice way. My best effort so far is the following: \newcommand{\tripow}[3]{ _{#1}{\stackrel{#2}{\triangle}}_{#3}} $\tripow{x}{y}{z}$ The only issue is that the right subscript appears a little low. But it does allow nesting fairly well.


1

The positioning of accents with respect to “accent atoms”, obtained by basically ignoring the accent and taking only the accentee into account, is a precise choice made by Donald Knuth when designing TeX, based on his study of traditional mathematical typesetting. Here are three ways for typesetting the \dot{\gamma} with an exponent; take your pick (but I ...


3

To get the Adobe symbol version rather than the Euler version of the glyphs, load the upgreek package with either the option Symbol or the option Symbolsmallscale; the latter option scales the glyphs down by about 10 percent. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[Symbol]{upgreek} \begin{document} $\upgamma$ \end{document}


1

I think you should put \usepackage{adfbullets} in the preamble. See http://texdoc.net/texmf-dist/doc/fonts/adfsymbols/adfsymbols.pdf (or run texdoc adfbullets) for further information.


6

I think this is the most recent siunitx' manual. Here the word percent appears only five times, and I cannot find permille or similar. A possible answer can be found here, that is, you can put the following declaration in the preamble \DeclareSIUnit\permille{\text{\textperthousand}} and then use it just as the \percent macro of siunitx. ...



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