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7

I'm sure you'll appreciate this devious trick: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{fancyvrb} %A more wedge-like caret for use in code. \newcommand\pow{% \hspace{-1pt}% \raisebox{-1pt}{\scalebox{1.2}{\textsf{\textasciicircum}}}% \hspace{-1pt}% } \newcommand{\makehatpow}{% \begingroup\lccode`~=`^ ...


0

Here are two versions. One is a stretched circle. However, the line-stroke width becomes non-uniform under a stretch, so I offer the second one where two stretched circles are overlaid, in an effort to preserve the appearance of uniform stroke width. I chose the oval size/aspect with the arguments {3}[1.5] to \scalebox. Thee can be changed. ...


3

The tikz package can be used for drawing inline as well as displayed figures. The following minimal example shows how to get the inline symbol of an ellipse as you wish: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} Here is an inline \tikz \draw (0,0) ellipse (10pt and 5pt); symbol for an ellipse. \end{document} With the the following ...


2

With Metapost. This is more complicated than it has to be, because it takes care to mark off each minute, and to use different widths and lengths for five-minute ticks as opposed to one-minute ticks, but it's still pretty simple: beginfig(1); diameter=160; radius=diameter/2; pickup pencircle scaled 0.5; z0 = (radius,radius); z50 = (radius,diameter); ...


3

\usepackage{pifont} That are no ams symbols


3

A solution using \vvvert of package mathabx. The symbol can also be used with \left and \right. Since the package changes many math symbols, the following example only defines \vvvert and the symbol fonts, needed for it without changing other math symbols: \documentclass{article} %\usepackage{mathabx} % Math symbol font matha ...


3

The standard package pifont provides three Christian-style crosses and the Star of David. I could do with a crescent for Islam, as well, and some other things but am not sure where to find them right now: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{pifont} \begin{document} \ding{61} \ding{62} \ding{63} \ding{65} \end{document} wasysym offers an alternative ...


1

Here is a way to go, with array and its modifier >{…} that allows to insert commands at the beginning of each cell of a column. It allows here to insert the $ sign in each cell of the second column, and the number of the rows in the first column. I also use makecell to have easy common formatting of column heads, and variable width horizontal rules: ...


4

Font Awesome provides a number of operating system logos (compile with XeLaTeX/LauLaTeX): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec,fontawesome} \newcommand{\faWindows}{\FA\symbol{"F17A}} \newcommand{\faLinux}{\FA\symbol{"F17C}} \newcommand{\faApple}{\FA\symbol{"F179}} \begin{document} \verb|Windows:| \faWindows \par \verb|Linux :| \faLinux \par ...


1

Using the exact technique I employed at Typing Following notation in Latex. One only has to uncomment the two fonttable lines in my MWE to ascertain that \equalclosed was symbol 221 of MnSyC. At that point, changing the pointer, the glphy macro, and the mathbin to mathrel was all that was needed. \documentclass{article} \DeclareFontFamily{U} ...


3

You can easily scale any symbol (math or text) using graphicx's \scalebox or \resizebox macros: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx, textcomp} \usepackage[svgnames]{xcolor} \begin{document} \scalebox{5}{\textcolor{IndianRed}{\textbf{\textreferencemark}}} \resizebox{2\baselineskip}{!}{\textcolor{IndianRed}{\textbf{\textreferencemark}}} ...


6

Exactly the size you want if you use a vector font. Here is how to type it in 48 pt: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{lmodern, textcomp} \usepackage[svgnames]{xcolor} \begin{document} {\color{IndianRed}\fontsize{48}{48}\selectfont \textreferencemark} Blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah ...


4

Based on Heiko Oberdiek's answer, there is --- just for the fun --- an even simpler drawing with TiKz. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \fill[yellow] (0,0) -- +(2,0) -- +(60:2) -- cycle; \fill[white] (60:1) -- +(1,0) -- (1,0) -- cycle; \end{tikzpicture} \end{document} Below the drawing with [blue!05] ...


5

I've been reading about 'partway modifiers' in the TikZ documentation: \documentclass[tikz]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \newcommand{\rotsym}[1]{% \rotatebox{#1}{$\subseteq$}% } \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node (a) at (0,0) {A}; \node (b) at (.75,.75) {B}; \node (c) at (1.5,0) {C}; \node (d) at (.75,-.75) {D}; %% TikZ documentation ...


5

Only with amssymb \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{amssymb} \begin{document} \Huge% \hspace{-8pt}$\blacktriangle$\vspace{-15pt}\\ $\blacktriangle$\hspace{-4pt}$\blacktriangle$ \end{document}


6

A solution that uses pstricks and the psmatrix environment from pst-node. It is compilable with pdflatex if you set the --enable-write18 (MiKTeX) or --shell-escape (TeXLive, MacTeX). \documentclass[a4paper,11pt, pdf]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc}% \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{pst-node} ...


11

Maybe too many features, but whenever it's possible to simplify input, it's better doing it. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,graphicx,xparse} \NewDocumentCommand{\diamondinclusion}{m >{\SplitArgument{1}{\\}}m m} {% \dodiamondinclusion{#1}#2{#3}% } \NewDocumentCommand{\dodiamondinclusion}{mmmm} {% \begingroup ...


7

For example (some spacing correction may be needed): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \[ \rotatebox{45}{$ \begin{array}{ccc} \rotatebox{-45}{$A$} & \subseteq & \rotatebox{-45}{$B$} \\ \rotatebox{-90}{$\subseteq$}& &\rotatebox{-90}{$\subseteq$}\\[9pt] \rotatebox{-45}{$C$} & \subseteq &\rotatebox{-45}{$ ...


17

Here is a nice shaded TikZ version which you can draw in variable sizes. You have to call the \triforce macro with one parameter, which is the width of the Triforce, e.g. \triforce{10cm}. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[svgnames]{xcolor} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{shadings, calc} ...


7

Just for fun, with pict2e: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{pict2e} \begin{document} \begin{picture}(2,1.732050808) \newsavebox{\tripart} \savebox{\tripart}{\moveto(0,0)\lineto(1,0)\lineto(0.5,0.866025404)\closepath\fillpath} \put(0,0){\usebox{\tripart}} \put(1,0){\usebox{\tripart}} \put(0.5,0.866025404){\usebox{\tripart}} \end{picture} \end{document} ...


9

Compile with XeLaTex : \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{color} \begin{document} I can triforce ! \noindent ~~\ding{115}\\ \ding{115}~\ding{115} Even in yellow: \color{yellow}{ \noindent ~~\ding{115}\\ \ding{115}~\ding{115} } \end{document}


9

With stacks. The top one is a simple stack of \TriangleUp symbols, whereas the bottom one uses a shrunken \stackinset upon the same, to achieve a border, as shown on the wiki reference. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine,xcolor,bbding,graphicx} \def\LTri{\stackinset{c}{}{c}{-.2pt}{\scalebox{.85} {\textcolor{yellow!20}{\TriangleUp}}} ...


38

A simple tikz solution: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \tikz\fill[yellow] (0,0) -- +(1,0) -- +(60:1) -- cycle (1,0) -- +(1,0) -- +(60:1) -- cycle (60:1) -- +(1,0) -- +(60:1) -- cycle ; \end{document}


1

Punctuation should never be separated from the preceding word (unless you're French). So Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam lobortis\DD{} facilisis sem. Nullam nec mi et neque pharetra sollicitudin. Praesent imperdiet\DD{} mi nec ante. is how you should input the code. Note {} in order to have a space after the symbol, ...


2

If there is to be no space before \DD (that is, it is exactly like punctuation) then use your definition as follows: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xcolor} \newcommand{\DD}{{\color{red}$\circ$}} \begin{document} Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam lovbabortis\DD\ facilisis sem. Nullam nec mi et neque pharetra sollicitudin. ...


0

\mathcal{} uses only CAPITAL LETTER ALPHABETS. To use small letter alphabets, you can use \mathscr{}, which also supports CAPITAL LETTER ALPHABETS. To use \mathscr{}, you need to include the package unicode-mathand use the font XITS Math and compile the document using xelatex or lualatex. Here is an MWE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} ...


2

% arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand\smallO{ \mathchoice {{\scriptstyle\mathcal{O}}}% \displaystyle {{\scriptstyle\mathcal{O}}}% \textstyle {{\scriptscriptstyle\mathcal{O}}}% \scriptstyle {\scalebox{.7}{$\scriptscriptstyle\mathcal{O}$}}%\scriptscriptstyle } \begin{document} $\mathcal{O} \smallO$ ...


6

Sorry for the late answer, but I just had the very same problem. My solution is the following: use a single-guillemot character, and rotate+stretch it using graphicx. \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{graphicx} \def\chk#1{#1^{\smash{\scalebox{.7}[1.4]{\rotatebox{90}{\guilsinglleft}}}}} The result is visually more elegant, as the resulting character ...


2

You can directly click here and see, if you have some fonts on your system that provide that symbol. If you are lucky (like me with Mathcad), you can use it as Ulrike said. Just in order to show the Mathcad symbol: % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{MathcadUniMath.otf} \begin{document} \symbol{"231B} \end{document} ...


9

Look for suitable fonts (http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/231b/fontsupport.htm) and then use lualatex or xelatex to create a small pdf: \documentclass[border=2pt]{standalone} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} {\LARGE\fontspec{Cambria}^^^^231b} {\LARGE\fontspec{Arial Unicode MS}^^^^231b} \end{document}


1

An alternative to Paul Gessler's methods. Method 4: embed the single character as an eps file \begin{filecontents*}{fich-l.eps} gsave newpath 696 139 moveto 674 62 627 -16 539 -16 curveto 487 -16 430 13 369 49 curveto 336 4 256 -16 209 -16 curveto 121 -16 64 34 64 87 curveto 64 146 114 193 196 193 curveto 236 193 284 171 ...


4

An alternative to mhchem would be the chemmacros bundle (including chemformula) by our user @cgnieder. The syntax is simple and (pretty) intuitive, in many ways similar to the syntax of mhchem. Here is a minimal example and the output. \documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage{chemformula}%loaded by chemmacros \begin{document} \ch{Zn^2+ ...


5

The arrowheads of \twoheadrightarrow are quite different from the arrowhead of \hookleftarrow; here's a solution that makes up a two head right arrow from two \rightarrow. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,calc} \makeatletter \newcommand{\retraction@inner}[2]{% \vcenter{\offinterlineskip \halign{% ##\cr ...


3

here's my attempt, using a technique stolen from the \substack command in amsmath. the arrow without the tail is a bit shorter than the other, since the tail is simply added onto tn existing arrow (and they're all the same length), so i've used the minus sign (as traditional with computer modern) to extend it a bit. this version will scale to the current ...


4

The glyph in question appears to be very similar to the uppercase L provided in the "curly" math font of the MathTime Professional 2 complete font set (commercial fonts). It can be used in three ways: Method 1: change all math fonts to MTPro2 \documentclass{article} \usepackage[mtpccal]{mtpro2} \begin{document} A set of strings is in the class ...


9

If you're open to using XeTeX or LuaTeX, you might find some possibilities in the excellent fontawesome font and its corresponding package (containing easy-to-use macros). Here are a few options: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontawesome} % requires XeTeX or LuaTeX \newcommand{\cmark}{\faOk} \newcommand{\pmark}{\faWarningSign} \begin{document} ...


38

Well it's not rocket science either \begin{tikzpicture}[limb/.style={line cap=round,line width=1.5mm,line join=bevel}] \draw[line width=2mm,rounded corners,fill=yellow] (-2,0) -- (0,-2) -- (2,0) -- (0,2) -- cycle; \fill (1.5mm,7mm) circle (1.5mm); \fill(0,-7.5mm) -- ++(10mm,0mm) -- ++(120:2mm)--++(100:1mm)--++(150:2mm) arc (70:170:2.5mm and 1mm); ...


21

I didn't find such a sign in the LaTeX symbol guide, so here is a tikz solution: Look for a nice sign on Wikipedia, download the svg file, convert svg to tikz with Inkscape. Then you can build a command like this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{tikz} \definecolor{cec1d24}{RGB}{236,29,36} \definecolor{cffffff}{RGB}{255,255,255} ...


4

Agreeing with Christian Hupfer, you can only include the graphics directly. There is no symbol explicitly for this. Possibly, you can reconstruct using TikZ or other packages. For now, this should do. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[right=10cm,paperheight=4cm]{geometry} \usepackage[textwidth=8cm,shadow]{todonotes} \usepackage{pifont} ...


4

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} $\mathrm{A} \xrightleftharpoons[k_2]{k_1} \mathrm{B}$ \end{document}


3

I think Matthew is right, there is the pdffonts output from the article Barbara linked to name type emb sub uni object ID ------------------------------------ ----------------- --- --- --- --------- Times-Roman Type 1C yes no no 763 0 Times-Bold ...


22

To me this looks like a blackboard bold lowercase a. Specifically, it looks like the lowercase a from the bbold font. For blackboard bold capitals you can use the \mathbb macro provided by the amsfonts or amssymb packages. But $\mathbb{a}$ gives a backwards G. Instead, you need to load the whole bbold font. Here's a quick snippet to do that. ...


4

\listfiles \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{cmbright} \begin{document} The section character \S\ is not rendering sans-serif. \end{document} gives a sans serif version: If not then have a look into your log file. There must be a warning if a charcter is not available in a specific font. I used an up-to-date TeXLive 2014


4

Note that mdput refers to MathDesign Utopia, not to Fourier. \documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amsfonts,theorem} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{newtxtext} \usepackage{newtxmath} \DeclareSymbolFont{cmlargesymbols}{OMX}{cmex}{m}{n} \DeclareSymbolFont{mdsymbols} ...



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