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5

The culprit is the MnSymbol package. If you prefer the \lrcorner from amssymb then save the value before loading the MnSymbol package and then reassign it afterwards: \documentclass{book} \usepackage{amssymb} \let\amslrcorner\lrcorner \usepackage{MnSymbol} \let\lrcorner\amslrcorner \begin{document} \( x\lrcorner y \) \end{document}


2

Perhaps you need \mathbf{E}. Does this solve? \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ \mathbf{E}(\xi)=\int_Z\xi d\rho \] \end{document}


0

For the sake of completeness I explain what I decided to do: I drew a symbol in TIkZ: \newcommand{\amlg}{ \hspace{1mm} \begin{tikzpicture}[inner sep=-.7pt,outer sep=0pt] \node (0,0) (cup) {\tiny $\boldsymbol \cup$}; \node[yshift=-3] (0,0) (pm) {\tiny $\textbf{\textdoublebarpipevar}$}; \end{tikzpicture} \hspace{1mm} } This is the ...


5

There's no reason whatsoever for making the “greater than” symbol smaller. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{siunitx} \usepackage{textgreek} \sisetup{math-micro=\text{\textmu}} \begin{document} \noindent of the magnetization at diffraction limited resolution (\SI{500}{\nano\meter}) simultaneously over a large area (\SI{>50}{\micro\meter}). This is ...


2

I do not understand your assistant as your version looks just right. This is the normal way. However, here are two solutions for smaller symbols. Not my recommendations, but you may do so: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{siunitx} \usepackage{relsize} \usepackage{tipa} \parindent=0pt \begin{document} % standard approach in math ...


0

The \diameter is an alternative for emptyset in lines, it is a bit tiny. \usepackage{wasysym} \diameter


0

You can find the font or create one (FontForge on Linux, you are on your own with other packages). I don't know what interface you use to TeX (I use LyX), but check out the FontAwesome package for how that package let's you easily add specific symbols from the font into your TeX document. Fontawesome is a symbol font ... you will be basically using the ...


3

You can easily do that with the accents package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{mathtools,amssymb} \usepackage{accents} \newcommand*{\uhat}[1]{\underaccent{\hat}{#1}} \newcommand*{\uwidehat}[1]{\underaccent{\widehat{\hphantom{#1}}}{#1}} \begin{document} $ \uhat{x}\enspace \uwidehat X$ \end{document}


2

For the under hat just use \underaccent{\check}; for the wide under hat, typeset the wide hat over a phantom of the argument, then flip it vertically, raising it by a suitable amount. Then overlap the flipped accent to the text. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{accents} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand{\uhat}{\underaccent{\check}} ...


10

There is (at least) one free true type font, named Alchemy that has this symbol. It's available from here for instance.Demo, with Xe/LuaLaTeX: \documentclass[12pt, a4paper]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} The \emph{amalgamation} or \emph{conjunction} symbol: \fontspec{Alchemy}\enspace \LARGE p \end{document}


2

That pdf uses fonts Alchemy, Alchemy A, Alchemy B , Alchemy C which google suggests are available from several places (not for free) eg https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/deniart/alchemy-symbols/c-regular/


1

I mean that \ooalign is not typical application for this task because this composed operator is right aligned, no center aligned. When \ooalign is used then you must correct the positioning by special constant (.5mu in egregs answer). More straightforward is to use \llap: $A \mathrel{{\subseteq}\raise.225ex\llap{$\circ$}} B$ Or, if you need to use this in ...


1

With the Lucida Math font (for pdflatex), here's what I get from the following code \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{lucimatx} \begin{document} \[ \frac{ \sqrt{x^2 + x} }{ \sqrt{x^2 + x} } \] \[ \frac{ \sqrt{\mathstrut x^{2} + x} }{ \sqrt{x^{\mathstrut 2} + x} } \] \end{document} I don't find the first display particularly ...


1

Here are two versions with the standard item in between. The first uses essentially beamers definition for the standard item triangle. \documentclass{beamer} \defbeamertemplate{itemize item}{compoundarrow}{\rule[0.5ex]{0.6ex}{0.6ex}% \scriptsize\raise2pt\hbox{$\!{\blacktriangleright}$}} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{shapes.arrows} ...


2

\documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{bbding} \defbeamertemplate{itemize item}{raisedsquare}{\rule[0.5ex]{0.6ex}{0.6ex}} \defbeamertemplate{itemize item}{boldarrow}{\ArrowBoldRightShort} \begin{document} \begin{frame} \begin{itemize} \setbeamertemplate{itemize item}[raisedsquare] \item First item \setbeamertemplate{itemize item}[boldarrow] \item Second item ...


3

This example works as expected: (note the r in front of the title string) #!/usr/bin/env python import matplotlib.pyplot as plt plt.title(r'$A \times B$') plt.plot([0,1,2]) plt.savefig('test.png')


0

As other answers have pointed out, csquotes is fantastic. Here are three reasons I like csquotes so much. Active quotation marks. Automatic management of nested quotations so that you can pretty much always just say 'quote this' and csquotes will figure out the right thing to do. Quotation marks which adapt automatically to both the global language of the ...


9

You have to do some chasing in kpfonts.sty to arrive at \documentclass{article} \DeclareSymbolFont{largesymbolsA}{U}{jkpexa}{m}{n} \SetSymbolFont{largesymbolsA}{bold}{U}{jkpexa}{bx}{n} \DeclareMathSymbol{\varprod}{\mathop}{largesymbolsA}{16} \begin{document} \[ \varprod_{i=1}^n A_i\ne\prod_{i=1}^n A_i \] \end{document} The steps Look for \varprod in ...


0

It seems you are looking for the Unicode characters U+231C ("top left corner") and U+231F ("bottom right corner"). Can you type these in using your keyboard?


4

Here is a primitive attempt to achieve outcomes which may be close to what you need. This solution is perhaps suitable for those who wish to achieve square corner quotation marks such as yours, but prefer not to use a typesetting system specialised for Japanese such as pTeX [PDF documentation], or who cannot use a TeX engine specialised to use unicode input ...


2

\documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \DeclareMathSymbol{\invques}{\mathord}{operators}{`>} \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{00BF}{\tmquestiondown} \DeclareRobustCommand{\tmquestiondown}{% \ifmmode\invques\else\textquestiondown\fi } \begin{document} \tableofcontents \section{¿Qué tal? $G_{¿}$} ¿Qué tal? $G_{¿}$ ...


4

\text works fine for me: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} ?`abc? $\text{?`}a=b$ \end{document}


5

Don't set multiple letter identifiers like runs in math italic, use \mathrm{runs} or \mathit{runs} For the question mark \mbox{?`} or \mbox{¿} if you have specified \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} Note that > only typesets as ¿ if you use the original 7-bit OT1 encoding, if you use T1 (or any other encoding) > will ...


6

You can use the rsfso package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[scr]{rsfso} \newcommand{\Laplace}{\mathscr{L}} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \Laplace\{\sin(t)\} = \frac{1}{s^2 + 1} \end{equation} \end{document} Variant preamble if you need also mathrsfs (but in that case I'd simply use the script L provided by \mathscr{L}): ...


7

Here, I use Bruno's \slantbox from Shear transform a "box" in conjunction with \mathscr. EDITED to use John K's variant of \slantbox at Adjust custom made upright greek letters when used in subscripts in order to achieve better horizontal positioning within the \slantbox. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \newsavebox\foobox ...


3

\documentclass{article} \begin{document} This is an inline $\partial$ \end{document}


0

You can make a command to typset quotation marks correctly without installing any packages. Add the following to your preamble: \newcommand{\q}[1]{``#1''} and then simply type your in-text quote in place of <text> in the following \q{<text>} Therefore, your document code should look like \documentclass{article} \renewcommand{\q}[1]{``#1''} ...


2

In case you are using TeXstudio or Texmaker, you can browse the built-in catalog of symbols and find the symbol you need in the appropriate category of symbols (see the image below). It is very convenient, as by clicking on the symbol it gets automatically inserted into your document. Moreover, if you're using TeXstudio on Windows, you can use Wizards ...


1

If you can't access these symbols from a Unicode font, but you can see them on screen, you could grab them in some form and then include them as a graphic. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand{\lbrackopen}{% \raisebox{-.6ex}{% \includegraphics[height=\baselineskip]{lbrackopen}% }% } \begin{document} I could use [this] ...


3

Here I use stacks to set 3 \sims vertically. The scalerel package allows me to preserve the math style of the invocation, and to define the stacking gap as a combination of .5pt plus 1.5 scaled-to-local-math-style points, given as 1.5\LMpt. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{scalerel,stackengine} \def\apeqA{\SavedStyle\sim} ...


7

If the symbol \approxident is not available, see greg's answer, the following definition provides the symbol by using \sim three times moved with a gap close to the gap of the \equiv symbol (more or less because of line thickness issues). The symbol works in the different math style versions and the lower border of the bounding box is fixed to get a correct ...


7

If you can use the stix package (or unicode-math), then the symbol is available as \approxident. Note however that \usepackage{stix} in a pdfLaTeX document will change all math symbols. Also importing only the symbol from the STIX fonts might give one that's not compatible with your symbols. There is a solution in the Comprehensive List of Symbols: ...


1

As someone who would otherwise be using the "divides" symbol all the time in similar situations, I find that it simply isn't a very appropriate symbol to use once you start using other vertical bars. (I use the vertical bar in set comprehension carefully for exactly the same reason.) Really, you should instead be writing something like $\lvert G \rvert \in ...


0

\documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{mathtools} \DeclarePairedDelimiter\ord{\lvert}{\rvert} \providecommand\divides{} % Trick used because \divides is defined with some packages \renewcommand*\divides{\mathrel{|}} % If you want it bigger by default use \mathrel{\big|} \begin{document} $\ord{X} \divides \ord{G}$ \end{document} In case you want it to be ...


4

You can use the package upquote and put the code in a verbatim environment. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{upquote} \begin{document} \begin{verbatim} data 'a list = Nil | Cons (e, 'a list) \end{verbatim} \end{document}


0

A (similar) alternative, using gathered environment: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand{\xdownarrow}[2][]{% \left.{#1}\right\downarrow{#2}} \begin{document} $ \xdownarrow[\begin{gathered} \vspace{5cm} \end{gathered}]{} $ \end{document} If you want, it can be used with linebreaks inside: $ \xdownarrow[\begin{gathered} ...


2

You probably want \usepackage{mathrsfs} in the document preamble and \mathscr{S} for the symbol (in math mode). Note that you can often use http://detexify.kirelabs.org or http://www.tex.ac.uk/ctan/info/symbols/comprehensive/symbols-a4.pdf to find out yourself.


3

You do not need use \newcommand. Your symbol is part of the packages txfonts and pxfonts. You must insert in the preamble: \usepackage{txfonts} % https://www.ctan.org/tex-archive/fonts/txfonts And insert in the text: \textit{\textbf{Symmetry:}} $(X \Perp Y | Z) \Rightarrow (Y \Perp X | Z)$. \textit{\textbf{Decomposition:}} $(X \Perp YW | Z) \Rightarrow ...


1

XIndy You may consider switching to XIndy, a much more powerful index generator, which supports sorting rules for many languages. Helping Makeindex The sorting of Makeindex can be influenced by specifying a sorting key. In the default setting, the character @ separates the sorting key from the word, which appears in the index, e.g.: ...


13

It's easy to use a zero space sans serif X, then a small space and then another sans serif X: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \newcommand{\range}{% \mathop{\mathrlap{\mathsf{X}}\mspace{3mu}\mathsf{X}}% } \begin{document} The \emph{range} of $X$, denoted $\range$. The range of $f$ is $\range f$. \end{document} Here is the same if I ...


17

The symbol can be constructed from the sans serif math font, e.g.: \documentclass{article} \newcommand*{\RangeX}{% \mathsf{X}\mkern-9mu\mathsf{X}% } \begin{document} , the \textbf{range} of $X$, denoted $\RangeX$, \end{document} If the symbol is also used in the smaller math styles (\scriptstyle, \scriptscriptstyle), then the width ...


7

\documentclass[border=5pt]{standalone} \newcommand{\statrange}{{\sffamily X\kern-.5em X}} \begin{document} the range of X, denoted \statrange, \end{document}


14

The following example sets \otimes as upper limit over the comma, which is turned to a math operator via \mathop. This also decreases the size of ⊗. By explicitly using \scriptscriptstyle, the symbol can be decreased further, see Manuel's comment. Then the result is wrapped in \mathpunct to keep the property of the comma as punctuation character: ...


14

You can use \overset from amsmath: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[\{L(\lambda)\ \overset{\otimes}{,}\ L(\mu)\}\] \end{document} I added optional spaces to make it look more like your example: As noted in the comment, you can use \scriptscriptstyle to make \otimes smaller: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} ...


5

One possibility \stackrel{\otimes}{,}: $\left\{L\left(\lambda\right)\ \stackrel{\otimes}{,}\ L\left(\mu\right)\right\}$


3

Not that I like the symbol, but here it is: \documentclass{article} \newcommand\dblwr{\wr\mkern-2mu\wr} \newcommand{\seminorm}[1]{\mathopen{\dblwr}#1\mathclose{\dblwr}} \begin{document} $\seminorm{x}$ \end{document}


1

From the comment of barbara beeton, \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \rotatebox{90}{$\approx$} \end{document} Gives the desired output.


1

The stmaryroad fonts have triangles with a shape close to to what you want; aimple solutions consists in scaling their bold version: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \newcommand\smalltriangleup{\mathbin{\raisebox{\dimexpr\depth-0.2pt\relax}{\scalebox{0.6}{$ \boldsymbol\bigtriangleup$}}}} ...


7

Picture mode to the rescue! \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pict2e} \makeatletter \newcommand{\cwedge}{\mathbin{\mathpalette\do@cwedge\relax}} \newcommand{\do@cwedge}[2]{% \sbox\z@{$#1\m@th\wedge$}% \dimen@=\ht\z@ \unitlength=.005\wd\z@ \count@=\dimen@ \divide\count@\unitlength \begin{picture}(200,\count@) \roundjoin ...



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