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3

If you can find the appropriate black symbol, then it can be colored easily: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{xcolor} \begin{document} \[ \triangledown \blacktriangledown \begingroup \color{blue} \blacktriangledown \endgroup \] \end{document} If the symbol is a math symbol, then the color should be set via: ...


2

A possible way: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \usepackage[dvipsnames]{xcolor} \usepackage[geometry]{ifsym} \begin{document} Example: {\color{SeaGreen}\FilledBigTriangleDown} \end{document}


0

This answer amplifies on the accepted answer. As many have noted in other answers, using MnSymbol package changes many glyphs, which is usually not wanted. So the approach mentioned in a number of answers is to import just the desired glyphs from MnSymbol. leaving all the others intact. The "value added" I perform here, since that approach seems to be ...


2

May be the “unicode way”: \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{00B7}{\ifmmode\cdot\else\textperiodcentered\fi} \begin{document} I'm new to \LaTeX, and I have no idea how to type this ·; in \LaTeX. \end{document} If you don't want to use the unicode point in \DeclareUnicodeCharacter you ...


4

The symbol in the question consists of U+00B7 MIDDLE DOT and the semicolon. This can be set in different ways in LaTeX, for example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{calc} \newcommand*{\dotsemicolonA}{% $\cdot$;% } \newcommand*{\dotsemicolonB}{% \raisebox{\heightof{;}/2}{.};% } \begin{document} \dotsemicolonA\ or \dotsemicolonB \end{document} ...


1

I was always taught that the dollar sign was originally created as a superposition of "U" and "S", a uniquely American symbol. Thus, for a really old version of the symbol, I build it here from scratch. Here, I show the serif and sans versions of the "S". \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine,graphicx} \def\origdollar{% ...


6

You can often find the fonts you want by searching on detexify Try \documentclass{article} \usepackage{textcomp} \begin{document} \textdollaroldstyle \end{document} That may seem like a lot to write out, so in your preamble you can put \let\dollar\textdollaroldstyle and then you can write \dollar3.50 in you document and get the proper symbol.


2

If you want a Fraktur or Semi-Fraktur dollar sign, see the Rotunda capital S: However, I have not been able to find a matching font file. Take a look at the dollar sign in http://www.abstractfonts.com/font/14113/charmap?frameless=1&rndint=4637722&brief=1. This is only one typeface in http://www.abstractfonts.com/category/31/Calligraphy. Several ...


1

\documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ \in \mbox{and} \ni \] \end{document} The symbol can be found in "Table 139: Letter-like Symbols" of The Comprehensive LaTeX Symbol List.


7

Not \=i\ but \=\i \i is the dotless i command. If you use \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} then you should just be able to type Ibn-Sīnā directly. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{012B}{\=\i} \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{0101}{\=a} \begin{document} [ Ibn-Sīnā ] or [ Ibn-S\={\i}n\={a} ] ...


0

I had this exact problem recently! I tried two things: I added \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}, with no success. I tried another, related package approach, but had no luck with that, either. I manually replaced the offending apostrapes with ones I typed freshly. This worked. To make this more efficient, you might consider doing a find-and-replace. This worked! ...


3

You need to escape your ampersand, just prepend it with a backslash like this: @book{Ref1, author = " Myself", title = "it's my book", year = "2015", publisher = " Home publication", address = "At home, Smith \& Johns, abc ", } To expand on this, the reserved characters in LaTeX are: # $ % ^ & _ { } ...


6

Since macros are expanded in a \write, I'd have \edef\shebang{\string#!/bin/bash} in the preamble so that you can use \newcommand{\CreateBashScript}{% \immediate\write18{echo "\shebang" > \jobname.command}% } in the command. As told in the comment, you could also double the # in the replacement text \newcommand{\CreateBashScript}{% ...


2

If you just need some circular waves, you may want to use expanding waves here: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{decorations.pathreplacing} \tikzset{radiation/.style={decorate,decoration={expanding waves,segment length=3pt},thick}} \begin{document} Beep: ...


3

My first thought is the same as Sigur's, to rotate a symbol from the FontAwesome font. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Linux Libertine O} \newfontfamily\fawesome{FontAwesome} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand{\beep}{{\fawesome\raisebox{.75ex}{\rotatebox[origin=bl]{320}{\char"F09E}}}} \begin{document} Will the symbol ...


5

As stated in the comments ~ inserts a non-breaking space. This means that you tell the typesetting algorithm that it should not insert a linebreak here. This is useful when making references. For example, if you write according to the Pythagorean theorem there is a lot to be learned form a triangle. You might see in equation \eqref{eq:1} there is some ...


3

The best, i.e., "most LaTeX-y" way to typeset this expression is to set up a macro named, say, \norm, that takes one argument -- the term(s) to be encased in double vertical bars. With the method shown in the example below, it's easy to change the size of the bars, if needed, by providing an optional argument to the \norm macro. \documentclass{article} ...


0

Have you tried the artemisia option to the artemisia package?. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[artemisia]{textgreek} \begin{document} Omega: \textit{\textomega} \end{document}


2

This might go in the right direction. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{newtxmath} \begin{document} $I_{\mathrm{cm}} \omega^2$ \end{document}


2

The table formatted with the lines of package booktabs and the numbers and symbols via package siunitx. Atomic mass taken from Wikipedia. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{caption} \usepackage{booktabs} \usepackage{siunitx} \sisetup{ separate-uncertainty, multi-part-units = single, } \begin{document} \begin{table} \centering ...


1

What's your preamble? Your code works fine for me if I load the textcomp package. You can also write $^\circ$ instead of \textdegree and $\pm$ instead of \textpm. For this you do not need textcomp. MWE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{textcomp} %remove if you use $^\circ$ and $\pm$ instead \begin{document} \begin{table}[h] \centering ...


3

You need to tell pdflatex that the source is utf8 as well. Add \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} at the top of the preamble.


0

If you need the curly braces to stay "curvy" even if they're quite large, you may want to look into using the mtpro2 package and its \LEFTRIGHT macro. The smallest curly brace, on the left, is generated by \{; the largest curly brace is more than 5 cm tall! Note that all braces are "curvy", which is not the case if one uses \left\{... to generate them. ...


2

\left needs an accompanying \right (within the same group) in order for it to work as expected. The null delimiter . could be used to provide an accompaniment that shouldn't be printed (and may require some spacing correction). For fixed-height sizes, you can use \big, \Big, \bigg or \Bigg. Extensible delimiters require \left (or \mleft): ...


4

It seems to be a “design decision” (read “bug”) by the developers of Latin Modern Math. Here is the evidence; I typeset the character in text mode, so it can't be influenced by possible effects of automatic math spacing or vertical shifting. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmathfont{latinmodern-math.otf} ...


1

I show my solution for this problem for plain TeX, where amsmath.sty isn't loaded, because the first line of this macro file says: \NeedsTeXFormat{LaTeX2e}. I leaved the \skewchar calculation because this is more suitable for accents like dot. My \ẅidebar begins by left slanted border (by default) and ends at the same place as \overline. If the first token ...


5

The following, stripped-down version of your example reproduces the positioning problem you've encountered: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{unicode-math} \begin{document} $x= \pm 1$ \end{document} The culprit appears to be the instruction \usepackage{unicode-math}, which loads the Latin Modern Math fonts. If the package isn't ...


2

It's due to the font you choose. You should use an other font if you dislike this sign. So with this font it's normal. Do you need the line : \setmathfont{latinmodern-math.otf} maybe you can reassign the base font only for the \pm sign, like you did for \int for example p.s. : I didn't know Vanilla TeX. My answer is correct for XeLaTeX, but I think it ...


4

This does it for the \alpha and \beta, for example. \documentclass{book} \usepackage{amsmath} %\usepackage{cmbright} \DeclareSymbolFont{CMB}{OML}{cmbrm}{m}{it} \DeclareMathSymbol{\alphasf}{\mathalpha}{CMB}{11} \DeclareMathSymbol{\betasf}{\mathalpha}{CMB}{12} \begin{document} \[ AB\alpha\alphasf\beta\betasf \] \end{document}


1

The extension e-TeX (should be enabled with the LaTeX format) adds \middle to \left and \right. Also the sizes can be manually set using \big and friends. The latter looks nicer, because the index of the summation does not need to be included in the size of the delimiters. Also \bigm sets additional space around the symbol, because it is set as relational ...


5

Infix operators like + and - lose their infix status (and the extra space that implies) if used on their own in this way. Also as noted by egreg, in a superscript the operators would get no space even used as an infix operator. What you have is the standard markup.


4

This is due to not having a space in the definition of the active ': \adef'{\char"0D} should be \adef'{\char"0D } so TeX will know where the constant terminates (and the space will be gobbled by TeX rule). In the first case, TeX is presented with 'C that becomes \char"0DC and TeX duly looks for character number "DC (which of course doesn't ...


3

You need to add the fallback for dagger: \unprotect \definefontfallback [pagellaovereuler] [texgyrepagella-math] [0x02020] [\c!check=\v!yes,\c!force=\v!yes] \protect Full working example: \usetypescriptfile[euler] \definetypeface[mainface][rm][serif][palatino] [default] \definetypeface[mainface][ss][sans] [helvetica] [default] ...


0

Self-answer: $x^{\text{†}}$. :-/


4

You can use with XeLateX or LuaLaTeX the \faMobile command, from package fontawesome. You also can use the Smartphone Icons, downloadable from this site, which has an extensive set of icons: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{array} \usepackage{fontawesome} \begin{document} \texttt{Font Awesome: }\vskip2ex Text text text \faMobilePhone\vskip3ex ...


32

A mobile phone using direct \pdfliteral should look like this: \def\mobile{\leavevmode\hbox to7bp{\kern1bp \lower1bp\vbox to12bp{}% \pdfliteral{q 0 g 0 G 1 j 2 w 0 0 5 10 re B 1 g 1 G 1 w .3 1.8 4.4 7 re B 1.5 w 2.5 .2 0 .1 re B .3 w 1.7 10 1.6 0 re B Q}% \hss}} Mobile: \mobile Result: Edit: Maybe you need scaled version of this. ...


7

Create a document with only one symbol in it: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontawesome} \pagestyle{empty} \begin{document} \Huge\faMobilePhone \end{document} Process it with lualatex and pdfcrop and \includegraphics the result in your document and run pdflatex on it. EDIT1: Thanks to Heiko Oberdiek A one-stop solution is to use standalone ...


9

Just find a suitable graphic, e.g., http://trendafrica.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Smartphone-icon.jpg, and place it in a macro that scales it to size. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \def\smartphone{\includegraphics[height=\ht\strutbox]{Smartphone-icon}} \begin{document} Text \smartphone \end{document}


5

The culprit is the MnSymbol package. If you prefer the \lrcorner from amssymb then save the value before loading the MnSymbol package and then reassign it afterwards: \documentclass{book} \usepackage{amssymb} \let\amslrcorner\lrcorner \usepackage{MnSymbol} \let\lrcorner\amslrcorner \begin{document} \( x\lrcorner y \) \end{document}


2

Perhaps you need \mathbf{E}. Does this solve? \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ \mathbf{E}(\xi)=\int_Z\xi d\rho \] \end{document}


0

For the sake of completeness I explain what I decided to do: I drew a symbol in TIkZ: \newcommand{\amlg}{ \hspace{1mm} \begin{tikzpicture}[inner sep=-.7pt,outer sep=0pt] \node (0,0) (cup) {\tiny $\boldsymbol \cup$}; \node[yshift=-3] (0,0) (pm) {\tiny $\textbf{\textdoublebarpipevar}$}; \end{tikzpicture} \hspace{1mm} } This is the ...


5

There's no reason whatsoever for making the “greater than” symbol smaller. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{siunitx} \usepackage{textgreek} \sisetup{math-micro=\text{\textmu}} \begin{document} \noindent of the magnetization at diffraction limited resolution (\SI{500}{\nano\meter}) simultaneously over a large area (\SI{>50}{\micro\meter}). This is ...


2

I do not understand your assistant as your version looks just right. This is the normal way. However, here are two solutions for smaller symbols. Not my recommendations, but you may do so: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{siunitx} \usepackage{relsize} \usepackage{tipa} \parindent=0pt \begin{document} % standard approach in math ...


1

The \diameter is an alternative for emptyset in lines, it is a bit tiny. \usepackage{wasysym} \diameter


0

You can find the font or create one (FontForge on Linux, you are on your own with other packages). I don't know what interface you use to TeX (I use LyX), but check out the FontAwesome package for how that package let's you easily add specific symbols from the font into your TeX document. Fontawesome is a symbol font ... you will be basically using the ...


3

You can easily do that with the accents package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{mathtools,amssymb} \usepackage{accents} \newcommand*{\uhat}[1]{\underaccent{\hat}{#1}} \newcommand*{\uwidehat}[1]{\underaccent{\widehat{\hphantom{#1}}}{#1}} \begin{document} $ \uhat{x}\enspace \uwidehat X$ \end{document}


2

For the under hat just use \underaccent{\check}; for the wide under hat, typeset the wide hat over a phantom of the argument, then flip it vertically, raising it by a suitable amount. Then overlap the flipped accent to the text. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{accents} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand{\uhat}{\underaccent{\check}} ...


10

There is (at least) one free true type font, named Alchemy that has this symbol. It's available from here for instance.Demo, with Xe/LuaLaTeX: \documentclass[12pt, a4paper]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} The \emph{amalgamation} or \emph{conjunction} symbol: \fontspec{Alchemy}\enspace \LARGE p \end{document}


2

That pdf uses fonts Alchemy, Alchemy A, Alchemy B , Alchemy C which google suggests are available from several places (not for free) eg https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/deniart/alchemy-symbols/c-regular/


2

I mean that \ooalign is not typical application for this task because this composed operator is right aligned, no center aligned. When \ooalign is used then you must correct the positioning by special constant (.5mu in egregs answer). More straightforward is to use \llap: $A \mathrel{{\subseteq}\raise.225ex\llap{$\circ$}} B$ Or, if you need to use this in ...



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