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2

Those references are badly formatted: title={Schemes over {$\mathbb{F}_1$}}, and title={Zeta functions over {$\mathbf{F}_1$}}, should be the right ways. Although I'd use \mathbf for both; check the original papers to see the right formatting. Also the — in the booktitle field should be ---: In the example I use filecontents* so that it is ...


3

Seems to be \mathfrak{X} from the amssymb package. You can find this out yourself using http://detexify.kirelabs.org/classify.html.


0

my solution is: $\ni \negthickspace \negthickspace \negthickspace / $ or$\owns \negthickspace \negthickspace \negthickspace /$ at least on my page it worked fine.


1

This is one possible solution where for repeated nodes generation and wire connections, several foreach commands are used. A style called dot with two arguments is defined for the rotary switch so that an internal label is added for ease of wiring. #1 = locations, #2 = label. Code \documentclass[tikz,border=10pt]{standalone} ...


1

Did you try ? \usepackage{amssymb} \varkappa


1

run it with pdflatex -shell-escape <file> \documentclass{article} \usepackage{auto-pst-pdf} \usepackage{psvectorian} \begin{document} \psvectorian[mirror]{2} \end{document}


6

In addition to egreg's answer the other reason is same reason \sin gives an error, or \hat etc. By far the most common reason for encountering a ^ in text mode is that the author has gone blah blah and 1 + x^2 = 2, blah ... but forgotten to mark the math mode region. Making math mode commands an error in text mode is an explicit design decision that ...


1

You have to precompile the symbols with a PS-enabled compilation chain, for instance as follows: % in file ornamentright.tex \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{psvectorian} \begin{document} \psvectorian[mirror]{2} \end{document} Using latexmk: latexmk -pdfps ornamentright.tex Then you can include ornamentright.pdf in say foo.tex ...


10

Yes, there is a very basic one: when input lines are being read, if TeX finds two consecutive ^ characters, it interprets the input in a very peculiar way: if the ^^ combination is followed by two hexadecimal lowercase digits (0123456789abcdef), then TeX transforms the four bytes into the byte corresponding to the hexadecimal number; otherwise TeX computes ...


2

Here, I just overlay a scriptscriptstyle x near an e, and make sure I scale it to the current mathstyle. I call it \esubx. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{scalerel} \def\esubxcore{\makebox{$e_{\mkern-3.4mu\raisebox{.6pt}{$\scriptscriptstyle x$}}$}} \def\esubx{\scalerel*{\esubxcore}{e_{\scriptscriptstyle x}}} \begin{document} $xe/\esubx \quad ...


1

I found the ding 54 does a good job, but it is a bit too large so \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{pifont} \newcommand*{\matr}[1]{\mathbf{#1}} \newcommand*{\eleminvalid}{\ensuremath{\text{\scriptsize{\ding{54}}}}} \begin{document} \[\matr{A}=\begin{bmatrix}a & b\\c & \eleminvalid\end{bmatrix}\] \end{document}


5

There is code in the Comprehensive List of Symbols, but it's wrong: what's suggested is \newcommand{\dbar}{{\mathchar'26\mkern-12mu d}} but one needs to compensate the amount of backup, which is larger than the width of the bar by 3mu: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\dbar}{{\mkern3mu\mathchar'26\mkern-12mu d}} \begin{document} $32\lambda^2 ...


3

You need to edit invoice.cls and look for \$ and change it for whatever you want. Probably change to \pounds. Take a look at lines 62, 69, 74, 80 and 107.


5

The use of dollar signs is hard-coded in the template as \$. If you want a complete replacement of $ with £, you can add \renewcommand{\$}{\pounds} to your preamble. \documentclass{invoice} \def\tab{\hspace*{3ex}} \renewcommand{\$}{\pounds}% $ -> £ \begin{document} \hfil{\Huge\bfseries Initech Inc.}\hfil \bigskip\break % Whitespace \hrule % ...


3

Remove mathabx to restore the default \emptyset.


4

The letter is an uppercase “N” in a Fraktur style alphabet. Unless you find a Fraktur font in which the letter has that precise shape, you can add \usepackage{amssymb} \newcommand{\cobordism}{\mathfrak{N}} to your preamble (also \usepackage{amsfonts} would suffice, but usually amssymb is loaded, because it gives access to a wealth of math symbols). The ...


5

My eyes bleed, but here it is: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xparse} \NewDocumentCommand{\dgal}{sO{}m}{% \IfBooleanTF{#1} {\dgalext{#3}} {\dgalx[#2]{#3}}% } \NewDocumentCommand{\dgalext}{m}{% \sbox0{% \mathsurround=0pt % just for safety $\left\{\vphantom{#1}\right.\kern-\nulldelimiterspace$% }% \sbox2{\{}% \ifdim\ht0=\ht2 ...


1

Try this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \begin{document} " Just use plain double quotes " \end{document}


6

this is U+2983 U+2984 and \lBrace, \rBrace in stix or unicode-math packages \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stix} \begin{document} \[\lBrace zzz \rBrace\] \end{document}


3

This is an answer to revision 1 or revision 2. You mean something like this? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{array} \usepackage{siunitx} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{>{$}l<{$} @{ } S[table-format=2.4]} & 0.0735 \\ \times & {294} \\ \hline & 14.70 \\ + & 6.615 \\ + & 0.2940 \\ ...


4

I believe this is what you want. Recommend you read the documentation at http://texdoc.net/texmf-dist/doc/generic/xlop/xlop-doc.pdf \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xlop} \begin{document} \opmul{0.0735}{294}\qquad \end{document}


4

As Manuel indicates, my scalerel package can be used. However, I don't necessarily recommend this approach except in unusual circumstances. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{scalerel} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \def\x{\begin{bmatrix*}1&1\\1&1\end{bmatrix*}} \[{\scalerel*[2.2ex]{\int}{\x}}_{\!\!\!x=0}^{\infty}\x\,dx\] ...


5

You can get genealogic symbols as side effect when loading the genealogytree package. Currently, the symbols are not available as a font elements but as graphics (which should make not too much differenc to a user). \gtrsymBorn is the symbol for day of birth. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{genealogytree} \begin{document} Donald Ervin Knuth, ...


1

The stackengine package provides ready made macros for such things, providing options for vertical placement and separation, as well as horizontal alignment. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine} \stackMath \begin{document} CENTERED STACK: Specify gap:\def\stacktype{S} ...


2

The symbol you want to build is already available, so this is just a hint for other similar situations. If you want to set symbols on top of one another, as opposed to superimpose symbols over each other, the tool to use is \ialign, not \ooalign that is handy for the latter case. \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\ou}{% \mathrel{% ...


2

Let me start by saying that the amssymb package offers you out of the box the symbol you need as \lessgtr (there's also \grtless). If you need, for some reason, to build the symbol by stacking < and >, one option is to use \ooalign with some \raiseboxes; the whole construct can then be passed as argument to \mathrel to get the proper spacing ...


2

You have to declare a math font: \documentclass{memoir} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb,amsthm} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmainfont{Zapfino} \setmathfont{Latin Modern Math} \setmathfont[range=\mathup/{latin,Latin}]{TeX Gyre Heros} \begin{document} This is a proof $\sin x^2$ $\sum$ $\delta$ \end{document}


1

moderncv stores its symbols in a bunch of makros that you can redefine: \renewcommand*{\addresssymbol}{} \renewcommand*{\mobilephonesymbol}{} \renewcommand*{\fixedphonesymbol}{} \renewcommand*{\faxphonesymbol}{} \renewcommand*{\emailsymbol}{} \renewcommand*{\homepagesymbol}{} \renewcommand*{\linkedinsocialsymbol}{} \renewcommand*{\twittersocialsymbol}{} ...


3

Just add these lines to your preamble (logodblp.png is the name of the logo graphic file): \usepackage{etoolbox} \pretocmd{\makecvtitle}{\leavevmode\vskip-40pt{\includegraphics[scale = 0.33]{logodblp}}\vskip20pt}{}{} If you want to add the dblp logo to the additional information item, say, just add these lines to the preamble: \usepackage{etoolbox} ...


14

You can build your own: \documentclass[border=4pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \definecolor{Skin}{RGB}{221,188,135} \newcommand\Glasses{% \begin{tikzpicture} \fill (-2,0) circle [radius=1.5cm]; \fill[white] (-1.95,-0.1) circle [radius=1.2cm]; \fill (2,0) circle [radius=1.5cm]; \fill[white] (1.95,-0.1) circle [radius=1.2cm]; \fill (0,-4) -- ...


6

The commands you are looking for are \lbrack and \rbrack, althought using {[} and {]} also works (as was predicted by barbara beeton in her comment): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{menukeys} \begin{document} \menu[,]{\{,\},\%,\#,\lbrack,\rbrack,{[},{]}} \end{document} Useful resources to find commands for symbols: The Comprehensive Symbol ...


3

Here's how C++ is typeset in the C++ standard: \newcommand{\Rplus}{\protect\hspace{-.1em}\protect\raisebox{.35ex}{\smaller{\smaller\textbf{+}}}} \newcommand{\Cpp}{\mbox{C\Rplus\Rplus}\xspace} That looks like this:


6

It is an X in the mathpzc font: \documentclass{article} \DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathpzc}{OT1}{pzc}{m}{it} \begin{document} $\mathpzc{X}$ \end{document}


3

Do you mean like this? \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \S 1 \end{document}


1

Yet another way to create a dash is to use a strike-out through a space. It creates a slightly longer one than given in the answer by Sam Buss, which is what I needed. One could define the macro by \usepackage[normalem]{ulem} \newcommand{\mydash}{\hbox{\sout{ }}}


9

This first implementation will not work in the scriptstyles. See below for a more flexible answer. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine,graphicx} \def\hashop{\mathop{\stackengine{-0.5pt}{\#}{\scalebox{1.2}{$\bigcirc$}}{O}{c}{F}{F}{L}}} \def\dagop{\mathop{\stackengine{-0.5pt}{\dag}{\scalebox{1.2}{$\bigcirc$}}{O}{c}{F}{F}{L}}} \begin{document} ...


1

This implementation with the tabto package will work with certain limitations. Primarily, when \marginsymbol appears in any sectioning macro argument, it must be the last item in the argument. Second, if you are using a table of contents, or a chapter page-heading, you will need to use the optional argument of the sectioning macro to exclude the margin ...


1

Is the following too trivial? \documentclass{amsart} \begin{document} $\chi_{\raisebox{-.5ex}{$\scriptstyle A$}}$ $\chi_{\raisebox{-.5ex}{$\scriptstyle S_{i}$}}$ \end{document}


9

You may use the symbol U+1F453. Here are some fonts for this. You can browse the fonts on your system by clicking here. % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} \fontspec{symbola.ttf}\symbol{"1F453} \end{document}


4

There is an implicit kerning between the upper case A and the apostrophe, if the font package charter is used. Because of the shape of the A, a negative kerning makes sense. It's not a bug, but by choice of the font designer. The following example compares three cases: Unmodified version with implicit kernings as defined by the font. Without implicit ...


5

If you use xcharter there seems to be no problem: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{XCharter}% \begin{document} DARPA’s \end{document}


4

the problem is clearly in the kerning instructions in the font, so what you want to do is inhibit kerning. there are several ways to do that: DARPA{}'s -- an empty group DARPA\/'s -- an italic correction DARPA{'}s -- isolate the apostrophe in its own group your choice -- they should all have the same result. warning -- if the passage containing this ...


4

e-TeX's \detokenize helps to convert an arbitrary argument to something, which is safe to be used inside \csname: \expandafter\def\csname\detokenize{some text \foo{hello} \bar some more text}\endcsname{}


5

If you don't plan to have unbalanced braces inside \csname...\endcsname when you use it in the argument to anothe command, you can directly use { and }. For the backslash, just use \string; the only problem is to persuade TeX not to gobble a space after the mock control sequence: \expandafter\def\csname some text\string\some\space more} text\endcsname{} ...


5

\makeatletter \expandafter\def\csname xx\expandafter\@gobble\string\{yy\endcsname{} \expandafter\show\csname xx\expandafter\@gobble\string\{yy\endcsname


5

Instead of using \diameter, you can build the symbol yourself: \documentclass[12pt]{report} \usepackage{pict2e} \DeclareRobustCommand{\slashcirc}{{\mathpalette\doslashcirc\relax}} \makeatletter \newcommand\doslashcirc[2]{% \sbox\z@{$#1\m@th\circ$}% \setlength\unitlength{\wd\z@} \begin{picture}(1,1) \roundcap \put(0,0){\box\z@} ...


2

write-math.com Direct link to the online service This service allows classification by drawing (even works on mobile devices!) and by text search: Disclaimer: I am the author of the service. Some information The handwriting recognition toolkit (hwrt) is one possibility to classify you recordings. There are still many rough edges and the software gets ...


0

It worked using this \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{eurosym} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \pounds89


0

For the first part of your question on typing currency symbols, simply use the package eurosym. MWE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{eurosym} \begin{document} \euro \pounds \$ \end{document}


-1

You can also use \[ \stackrel{\mbox{lim}}{x \to 2} f(x) = 5 \]



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