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6

Here's a version based on the turnstile package. On the left are the standard versions of the three turnstiles you used in the question. On the right are versions using a modified version of the package's \makever command: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{turnstile,calc} \newcommand\mysststile{% single vertical with fins pointing backwards ...


5

Is this what you want? \documentclass[]{article} \usepackage{MnSymbol} \usepackage{pict2e} \makeatletter \DeclareRobustCommand{\cvdash}{% \mathrel{\mathpalette\cvd@sh\relax} } \newcommand{\cvd@sh}[2]{% \sbox\z@{$\m@th#1\vdash$}% \setlength{\unitlength}{1.1\wd\z@}% \begin{picture}(1,0.75) \roundcap\roundjoin ...


0

While this answer uses packages, it does not load fonts which change the default math symbols. It is set up to work across mathstyles. It has the virtue of being the same width as \rightarrow. As egreg notes, it will only work on a white background. Of course, if the non-white background color is known, the macro can be altered. \documentclass{article} ...


3

I found a trick that will do a decent job without having to install packages or anything. Just write in math mode $A-\!\! \rightarrow B$ The minus sign after the A is followed by two negative spaces in LaTeX and this will give the impression of a broken or dashed arrow. I was working on a poster and was loading several conflicting packages which made the ...


1

In order to get a not yet existing symbol as a character in LaTex from a logo or comparable, please follow these steps: Disclaimer: This is not a scientific approach nor one founded in Software Engineering. You can file it as a life hack if you so will. System used (YMMV): Windows 7.1 x64 XeLatex MikTex 2.9 fontspec package Step 1 Create an .svg file ...


1

I'm not sure what's the meaning of this, but you can try with relsize: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb,relsize} \newcommand{\fancybrackets}[1]{% \mathopen{\mathlarger{\mathlarger{\sqsubset}}}% #1% \mathclose{\mathlarger{\mathlarger{\sqsupset}}}% } \begin{document} $\fancybrackets{G_{n}}$ \end{document}


2

Something like The symbols are obtained through these definitions (need graphicx package): \newcommand{\bigsqsubset}{\mathrel{\text{\scalebox{1.5}{$\sqsubset$}}}} \newcommand{\bigsqsupset}{\mathrel{\text{\scalebox{1.5}{$\sqsupset$}}}} MWE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \usepackage{graphicx} ...


0

Do you want something like this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} \begin{document} sbhfgjksd safjksdhfjk sahjkfhsjk fsabf jksabfkjsbfk sfalsjfj, lnsadf snfjklsaflhwuioerhs lsdhfsda sadf safdlsalf nsafdjnsaklfsaklfd safdj\hfill$\emptyset$ sbhfgjksd safjksdhfjk sahjkfhsjk fsabf jksabfkjsbfk sfalsjfj, lnsadf ...


4

Simple option with fontawesome which provide icon \faPlayCircle \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontawesome} \usepackage[dvipsnames]{xcolor} \begin{document} \colorbox{black}{{\color{ForestGreen}\faPlayCircle}\ {\color{white}\sf Run}} \end{document} Which gives


2

You can build your icon using TikZ: The code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{tikz} \definecolor{playgreen}{RGB}{58,193,62} \newcommand\PlayButton{% \begin{tikzpicture} \node[draw=black,fill=black,thick,minimum width=3.7em,minimum height=3.2ex] (bframe) {}; \node[minimum ...


6

There are also blocks of different thicknesses in the Zapf Dingbats supported by pifont. Unlike bbding, these will be scalable even with a default TeX Live installation (which does not include the type1 versions of bbding for licensing reasons). \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsthm,pifont} \begin{document} \ding{120} \ding{121} \ding{122} ...


8

Perhaps \RectangleBold or \Rectangle from the bbding package? Or make your own symbol using a \rule (no packages required): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsthm} \usepackage{bbding} \newcommand\MyRectangle{\rule{.36em}{2ex}} \renewcommand\qedsymbol{\RectangleBold} \begin{document} \begin{proof} A test text. \end{proof} ...


7

Redefine \qedsymbol: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsthm} \usepackage{amssymb} \renewcommand\qedsymbol{$\blacksquare$} \begin{document} \begin{proof} A test text \end{proof} \end{document} I wouldn't recommend to switch off right alignment for the end-mark (it's not standard, so readers might miss the end-mark and quite franckly, it looks ...


1

Thanks to Christian Hupfer I found this new list: http://tug.ctan.org/info/symbols/comprehensive/symbols-letter.pdf And found the solution I wanted \ding{55} from table 251


1

I assume you're not interested in the operator-status of \bigwedge then. That is, you just want to use it as a symbol. For that, resize it to suit your needs: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{adjustbox} % http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/256556/5764 \newcommand{\BigWedge}{\mathord{\adjustbox{valign=B,totalheight=.6\baselineskip}{$\bigwedge$}}} ...


3

As Latin Modern seems to be your preferred font family, the definition of \mypound used in the example below may be what you're looking for. \documentclass[oneside,11pt]{memoir} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{graphicx} % for \scalebox and \raisebox macros \newcommand\mypound{\scalebox{0.8}{\raisebox{0.4ex}{\#}}} ...


2

Here is a minor adjustment to the placement and size of \#: \usepackage{adjustbox} \let\oldhash\#% \DeclareRobustCommand{\#}{\adjustbox{valign=B,totalheight=.57\baselineskip}{\oldhash}}% adjustbox's valign=B ensures that the bottom of the box lies on the baseline, while totalheight=.57\baselineskip ensures it is about the size of a capital letter in the ...


0

I don't now if quadruple bonds can be made with chemfig but the curved bonds are no problem. With the tikz library "pathmorphing" and the following code \chemfig{A-[,3,,,decorate,decoration=snake]B} you get this: Other shapes can be made with nodes. Try this code for example \chemfig{@{a}A-[,,,,draw=none]@{b}B} \chemmove{\draw[-](a)..controls ...


0

You can use Class_noVisibilityMarkers. Class.A("Point") ("#x:int", "#y:int") ("+toString():String"); Class_noVisibilityMarkers.A; drawObject(A); Class_noVisibilityMarkers was not available in MetaUML 0.2.5, but it is now available from the master branch of https://github.com/ogheorghies/MetaUML .


4

I find this a very bad idea, but the customer's always right. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pict2e} \DeclareRobustCommand{\fauxleq}{\mathrel{\mathpalette\dofauxleq\relax}} \newcommand{\dofauxleq}[2]{% \sbox0{$\mathsurround=0pt #1\leq$}% \setlength{\unitlength}{\wd0}% \begin{picture}(1,0.7) \roundcap\roundjoin ...


8

You seem to be attaching meaning to a particular graphical representation of a symbol, but you shouldn't. When hand writing, the variant kappa you seem to be discussing about often has two small loops, but typographical representations usually omit them. Those loops are probably responsible for you mistaking the symbol with the letter “æ” (used in Danish, ...


1

You could use renewcommand to redefine the kappa function if you'd like. The following code should do it: \renewcommand\kappa{\text{\ae}} Include this at the top of your file and all kappa calls should show the ae symbol. Notice that I have also wrapped ae in a text command, so that you won't get any warnings about being in a math environment. Typically ...


1

This works for me (TL 2015), with some improvements. There is no need to use \addcontentsline explicitly, since imakeidx provides the means for this already. (hyperref complains about wrong entries already, best seen on command line!) As usual (except cleveref is in action), hyperref should be the last package to be loaded. \documentclass[12pt]{book} ...


1

Very simple solution from here: \texttt{john{@}gmail.com}


0

This was meant to be a comment but alas I lack the credits to do so. This is possible in pdfLaTeX.


2

I tried some of these except the {mtpro2} since for submitting articles that might not be acceptable by publishers! As I was not satisfied by the previous methods mentioned above, I tried to tailor another method, you can apply the following code, play with the scale factors and positions and choose which one you prefer. The last two I recommend but I ...


2

I tried some of these except the {mtpro2} since for submitting articles that might not be acceptable by publishers! As I was not satisfied by the previous methods mentioned above, I tried to tailor another method, you can apply the following code, play with the scale factors and positions and choose which one you prefer. The last two I recommend but I ...


2

You need the amssymb package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \begin{document} $H \unlhd G$ \end{document} Or even without the package you could say: \documentclass{article} \DeclareSymbolFont{AMSa}{U}{msa}{m}{n} \DeclareMathSymbol{\Bhaskarunlhd}{\mathrel}{AMSa}{"45} \begin{document} $H \Bhaskarunlhd G$ \end{document}


5

It occured to me, yesterday, that there does exist (at least) one font which includes glyphs for building a truly extensible integral sign: it is the PostScript Symbol font (psyr), which has such glyphs in positions 243 (octal '363, hexadecimal "F3), 244 (octal '364, hexadecimal "F4) and 245 (octal '365, hexadecimal "F5). Thus an approach along these lines ...


3

A case for \ooalign. I provide two variants, in the first one, the D is in math mode; in the second one it is in sans-serif text-mode font (I like this one). The example code shows the symbol for all math styles: The code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand\DUnion{ \mathop{\mathchoice ...


0

You can use mathbbol package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathbbol} \begin{document} \[ \mathbb{abcd} \] \end{document}


0

After a little searching on the internet, I found the bbm package that produces the blackboard symbol for lowercase letter


2

Use \string\@input{file.aux} to write the stuff literally into the aux file. As long no further expansion is involved, this is (the best?) way to get TeX commands literally into file output. The \immediate is not really, I just use it always ;-) \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \makeatletter \immediate\write\@auxout{% \string\@input{file.aux}% ...


3

Those references are badly formatted: title={Schemes over {$\mathbb{F}_1$}}, and title={Zeta functions over {$\mathbf{F}_1$}}, should be the right ways. Although I'd use \mathbf for both; check the original papers to see the right formatting. Also the — in the booktitle field should be ---: In the example I use filecontents* so that it is ...


3

Seems to be \mathfrak{X} from the amssymb package. You can find this out yourself using http://detexify.kirelabs.org/classify.html.


0

my solution is: $\ni \negthickspace \negthickspace \negthickspace / $ or$\owns \negthickspace \negthickspace \negthickspace /$ at least on my page it worked fine.


1

This is one possible solution where for repeated nodes generation and wire connections, several foreach commands are used. A style called dot with two arguments is defined for the rotary switch so that an internal label is added for ease of wiring. #1 = locations, #2 = label. Code \documentclass[tikz,border=10pt]{standalone} ...


1

Did you try ? \usepackage{amssymb} \varkappa


1

run it with pdflatex -shell-escape <file> \documentclass{article} \usepackage{auto-pst-pdf} \usepackage{psvectorian} \begin{document} \psvectorian[mirror]{2} \end{document}


6

In addition to egreg's answer the other reason is same reason \sin gives an error, or \hat etc. By far the most common reason for encountering a ^ in text mode is that the author has gone blah blah and 1 + x^2 = 2, blah ... but forgotten to mark the math mode region. Making math mode commands an error in text mode is an explicit design decision that ...


1

You have to precompile the symbols with a PS-enabled compilation chain, for instance as follows: % in file ornamentright.tex \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{psvectorian} \begin{document} \psvectorian[mirror]{2} \end{document} Using latexmk: latexmk -pdfps ornamentright.tex Then you can include ornamentright.pdf in say foo.tex ...


10

Yes, there is a very basic one: when input lines are being read, if TeX finds two consecutive ^ characters, it interprets the input in a very peculiar way: if the ^^ combination is followed by two hexadecimal lowercase digits (0123456789abcdef), then TeX transforms the four bytes into the byte corresponding to the hexadecimal number; otherwise TeX computes ...



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