New answers tagged

2

I'm not aware of any notation for this, but you can easily create it. Since there is already a 'floor' symbol, then one shouldn't move too far away from it. I think simply adding a subscript should be clear enough, and this follows the general idea used by logarithms. You'll have to make sure to define it when you use it. You could just use \lfloor 7 ...


8

Here is an image-based approach. The scaling is not perfect, but it's pretty close. The basic idea is to set the height of the image to the sum of the height of G and the depth of g in the current font. Then lower the image by the depth of g to attempt to align the baseline. Unfortunately, this method is dependent on the descender depth and capital height ...


6

Do you mean this: \documentclass[12pt]{book} \usepackage{fontawesome} \begin{document} Some foo text with \faGoogle \end{document} Update with Futura-Normal font and using XeLaTeX. The colour definitions are taken from Google new logo, the font is Product Sans, but this font isn't free, therefore I choose Futura-Normal ...


3

The only font I have that provides the glyph is Symbola that you can download from http://users.teilar.gr/~g1951d/ \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \newfontface{\symbolafont}{Symbola} \newcommand{\gaspump}{{\symbolafont\symbol{"26FD}}} \begin{document} This is the symbol for a gas pump: \gaspump \end{document}


5

I went to the place you pointed and downloaded the image as fuel_pump.png. Then I create a macro that scales it to the current \strut size. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{scalerel,graphicx} \newcommand\fuelpump{\scalerel*{\includegraphics{fuel_pump}}{\strut}} \begin{document} normalsize pump: \fuelpump \LARGE or LARGE: \fuelpump \end{document}


0

You can get justified text quite simply. In fact an answer with modified mwe may come as a duplicate of Paragraph of text in a an equation. However there are a reason or two to still try another answer separately. The question remains open on how to use the lipsum package in a maths environment. This could simplify the mwe as requested to not work it out ...


4

The Bera Mono fonts are not available in OT1 encoding, but only in T1; if you want to use them for typewriter type, you need \usepackage[T1]{fontenc}. This should be clear from the shown warnings LaTeX Font Warning: Font shape `OT1/fvm/m/n' undefined (Font) using `OT1/cmr/m/n' instead on input line 4. Correct example \documentclass{article} ...


0

Short answer: You have to also use the package lmodern: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{beramono} \usepackage{lmodern} \begin{document} \texttt{<>} \end{document} See Why do the less than symbol (<) and the greater than symbol (>) appear wrong as upside down exclamation (¡) or question mark (¿)? and "Greater than" sign ...


3

You could draw this with tikz: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,tikz} \newcommand{\curvearc}{\tikz[trim left]{\draw[->] (0,0) to[bend left] (1em,0);}} \begin{document} \( \stackrel{\curvearc}{AB} \) \end{document} If you would like the width of this arrow symbol to vary with the material underneath and then you can use the following ...


6

The cleanest way is to use csquotes. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage{csquotes} \begin{document} \enquote*{passen} \enquote{Geschachtelt kann der \enquote{Asterisk} weggelassen werden.} \end{document} This package searches the active language and uses its typical style. Above an example for a German text. You can switch ...


2

\usepackage{fourier} Then $\wideOarc{AB}$ However, as Andrew Swann noted in a comment, loading the fourier package changes all the fonts in the document.


0

It's not a mathematical symbol, it's definitely a capital S, but in cursive. That's how it usually appears when you write by hand and in some fonts, depending on the style, it really looks like a flipped ampersand. If you go to any website that provides fonts, search for "cursive font", and type a capital S. Some of them will look like the letter you ...


0

A somewhat larger version of \therefore may be built as: \dot{.\hspace{.095in}.}\hspace{.5in} Comparison traditional and larger version:


3

Here I link them together with a small rule. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine} \begin{document} \[ \stackengine{0pt}{{\footnotesize P}\kern-2.5ptA}{\kern1pt\rule{3pt}{.3pt}}{O}{l}{F}{F}{L} \] \end{document}


2

or \documentclass{article} \begin{document} $\textsc{p\kern-.3emA}$ \end{document}


2

like this ? \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage[frenchb]{babel} \begin{document} {P\scriptsize\hspace{-1em} A} {\scriptsize P}\hspace{-1em} A \end{document}


0

Another option: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\boldm}[1] {\mathversion{bold}#1\mathversion{normal}} \begin{document} There is a normal symbol, $p_1$. Now, a bold symbol: {\boldm $p_2$}. It works! \end{document} Output:


3

Assuming that you have unicode input correctly declared either via \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} or using xelatex or lualatex then `` will ligature to “ and produce identical output. So the pros and cons are all about the human interface to editing, not about latex. Most latex users use ascii input as they have been using it for a long time, but even ...


5

You can tap into amsmath's \genfrac: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand{\stirlingii}{\genfrac{\{}{\}}{0pt}{}} \begin{document} There is $\binom{a}{b}$ and $\stirlingii{a}{b}$ and also \[ \binom{a}{b} \text{ and } \stirlingii{a}{b}. \] \end{document} ...


-1

Try the symbol \ni which is pretty close


2

\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[english,italian]{babel} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb,amsthm} \newcommand{\DistTo}{\xrightarrow{ \,\smash{\raisebox{-0.65ex}{\ensuremath{\scriptstyle\sim}}}\,}} \begin{document} $\DistTo$ \end{document} Edit: Now I remember ...


1

I think it is a nice question, but... The minus on the TI-84 as a negative number can be used in the input without brackets... So you can type: 3 + -5 and the calculator will not make a problem of it. But if you type 3 + -5 as a minus, than the calculator will jump to the error "-". (same for 3*-5=-15 and 3* "-"5 gives an error. In order to show you the ...


-1

There is a great commend that allow you to put something on and under the \longrightarrow: x ‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎\und‎erset{down‎}{‎‎‎‎\ov‎‎erset{up‎}‎{‎‎\l‎ongrightarrow‎}}‎ y I hope this will be helpful.


3

There is no easy solution on this, as the font you have chosen does use some special "o" here. It is smaller. Just compare the letters "os" and you will see that the "o" from the numero symbol here has some other shape. Therefore it will always look wrong if you just put an "s" to its side. I could scale the letter down in order to fit the height, but this ...


4

Not convinced about the usefulness, but \documentclass{article} \def\numeros{N{\raisebox{0.2ex}{\textsuperscript{\underline{os}}}}} \begin{document} \section*{\numeros} \end{document} works:


2

You almost do what you like to achieve. See, if this works for you (I just ad $ before and after your variables, which put them in math environment): \documentclass{article} \begin{document} $n_e$ and $n_i$ are the density of electrons and ions; $m_{\alpha}$ and $Z_{\alpha}$ are the mass and charge number of species $\alpha$; $v_e$ and $v_i$ are the average ...


0

Another option: use \XBox with the wasysym package


2

Here is a first cut for the simple arrow you have proposed. This scales the arrow size and line width relative to the size when the font is 10pt. As in Rmano's answer, I have used em to modify the width. A node is added with a \strut at the end which, coupled with \raisebox{-.3\baselineskip}, allows the vertical placement of the arrow to be defined using the ...


2

You need to adjust the baseline etc., but using ex or em as basic measurement units you can have: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{arrows,positioning,calc} \def\mypic{\tikz[x=1em,y=1em,baseline=-0.5,->]{\draw[>=stealth] (0,0)--(0.5,0.5) --(1,0);}} \begin{document} text text \mypic\ text {\LARGE text \mypic text } ...


0

Copy some of the declarations from mathabx: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{libertine} \usepackage[libertine]{newtxmath} \usepackage{amsmath} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{mathx}{\hyphenchar\font45} \DeclareFontShape{U}{mathx}{m}{n}{<->mathx10}{} \DeclareFontSubstitution{U}{mathx}{m}{n} ...


3

Don't use \multirow: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \emph{NewElement}$\left( \mbox{``item'',}\left\{ \begin{tabular}{@{}l@{}} \emph{NewElement}(``title'', ``US sanctions North Korea over Sony''),\\ \emph{NewElement} ``pubDate'', ``Fri, 02 Jan 2015 20:07:38 GMT'') \end{tabular} \right\} \right)$ \end{document}


1

There are similar symbols, with the same straight cuts, in the STIX fonts. Note that using newpxtext and newpxmath rather than pxfonts is recommended. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{newpxtext,newpxmath} % alias for comparison; don't use the following three lines \let\PXbowtie\bowtie \let\PXltimes\ltimes \let\PXrtimes\rtimes \let\bowtie\relax ...


2

If you are not particular about which \lightning symbol you use, you can substitute \usepackage{stmaryrd} %\lightning for \usepackage{marvosym} %\Lightning Or for another one with a lightning symbol, you can check page 101 from The Comprehensive LaTeX Symbol List to see other similar symbols. I don't know what other packages you need to add so this ...


2

If you don't need it presented in \scriptstyle, etc, then this might suffice. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \def\depend{\mathbin{% \ooalign{$\perp$\cr$\,\perp$\cr\scalebox{1.3}[.5]{\raisebox{5pt}{$\mkern2mu/$}}}}} \begin{document} $\mathcal{G}\depend X$ \end{document} If one does need it in different math styles, then maybe this: ...


1

symbols-a4 gives a possible definition for \independent on p. 212 (§10.3): \newcommand\independent{\protect\mathpalette{\protect\independenT}{\perp}} \def\independenT#1#2{\mathrel{\rlap{$#1#2$}\mkern2mu{#1#2}}}


3

The symbols are actually footnote markers, so fnsymbol comes into action. An easy way to change this is using footmisc and define another set of fnsymbols with \DefineFNsymbolsTM{somename}. Please note that the syntax of this command is a list of macro name pairs, i.e. a text symbol and the 'corresponding' command in math mode. I just added some symbols ...


2

For a single instance, you can use \CommentX{<comment>} as defined below: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{algpseudocode} \usepackage{algorithm} \newcommand{\CommentX}[1]{\unskip~\%~#1~\%} \begin{document} \begin{algorithm} \caption{Caption} \textbf{INPUT:} Some input \\ \textbf{OUTPUT:} Some Output \begin{algorithmic} \State ...


5

The QED symbol is stored in \qedsymbol command and can be changed using \renewcommand. To insert the QED symbol simply type \qedsymbol but if you want to move it to the end of line, use \qedhere.


0

You could do the same as in the previous case by using insead of "newcommand" "declaremathoperator" on that place I thing it is little bit more straightforward... this is for example for double prime \documentclass{article} \DeclareMathOperator*{\dprime}{\prime \prime} \begin{document} $f''(x)$\\ $f^\dprime(x)$ \end{document}


1

You can use \DeclarePairedDelimiterX from mathtools, with an adjustment because the command doesn't really like empty delimiters: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools,xparse} \DeclarePairedDelimiterX{\parallelTwoAux}[2]{.}{.}{% #1\nonscript\;\delimsize\Vert\nonscript\;#2% } \NewDocumentCommand{\parallelTwo}{somm}{% \IfBooleanTF{#1} ...


3

See if the following solve your problem: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\parallelTwo}[2]{\left.#1\,\middle|\!\middle|\,#2\right.} \begin{document} \[ \parallelTwo{R}{\frac{1}{g_m}} \] \end{document} Edit: Added fine tuning of spaces around of "parallel" symbol. Similarly can be defined \newcommand for three parallel elements. For ...



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