New answers tagged

5

The position of the angle depends on the material to be typeset inside it. If you want that all \phase command produce the angle as if a comma is in the number, you can patch it as follows \documentclass{article} \usepackage{steinmetz} \usepackage{xpatch} \xpatchcmd{\phase}{#2}{\vphantom{,}#2}{}{} \begin{document} $220\phase{0^{\circ}}$ $220\phase{0{,}5^...


1

This might be what you want. It can be adjusted if needs arise. \documentclass{article} \makeatletter \DeclareRobustCommand{\divdiff}{\mathrel{\mathpalette\div@diff\relax}} \newcommand{\div@diff}[2]{% \mathstrut\ooalign{\hidewidth$\m@th#1|$\hidewidth\cr$\m@th#1\bigtriangleup$\cr}% } \makeatother \begin{document} $A\divdiff B_{x\divdiff y}$ \end{...


0

Are you looking by chance for something like this one: 234B ⍋ Apl Functional Symbol Delta Stile Since it is an APL character, you can try the package APL from CTAN (it looks like a plain TeX package, but once you have the character, you can adapt it to use with LaTeX as well). Alternatively, you can try to insert it directly from UNicode (given a ...


2

\defglsentryfmt has an optional argument that indicates which glossary this format should govern. If omitted, main is assumed, so you also need to do the same for the new glossary: \defglsentryfmt[symbolslist]{% \let\orgglsarg\glsarg \ifdefempty\glsinsert {}% {% \let\glsarg\glsinsert \let\glsinsert\relax }% \glsgenentryfmt \let\glsarg\...


1

You can load a math symbol font: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[lite]{mtpro2} \let\mtproforall\forall % just for the comparison \let\mtproexists\exists % just for the comparison \DeclareSymbolFont{CMsymbols}{OMS}{cmsy}{m}{n} \SetSymbolFont{CMsymbols}{bold}{OMS}{cmsy}{b}{n} \DeclareMathSymbol{\forall}{\mathord}{CMsymbols}{"38} \DeclareMathSymbol{\...


0

Building on the accepted answer and looking at the C# language specification (a .docx...) I came up with this: \newcommand{\csharp}{C\nolinebreak[4]\raisebox{.6ex}{\includegraphics[scale=.8]{hash-symbol}}} Which looks like this: Note that when using LuaLaTex you'll need to add \RequirePackage{luatex85} to the top of the file that you use for generating ...


0

Create a new character. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[]{graphicx} \usepackage{scalerel} \def\thumbsup{\scalerel*{\includegraphics{up.png}}{O}} \def\thumbsdown{\scalerel*{\includegraphics{down.png}}{g}} \begin{document} thumbs up \thumbsup thumbs down \thumbsdown \end{document} 0 and g refers to the character used as reference of size and vertical ...


1

The package amssymb provides the filled lozenge symbol $\blacklozenge$ similar to the filled diamond.


39

Just don't do this. two -- ligature to an n-dash and three --- ligature to an em-dash so if you have a multiple of three - you have a row of em dashses which may or may not have white space between them depending on the font. use a \rule or \hrulefill to make a line.


59

The usual TeX convention is that two hyphens in a row generate an en-dash, while three generate an em-dash. Consecutive em or en-dashes appear to form a solid line, although it is formed by distinct characters. However the hyphen does not combine, so if the number of hyphens is a multiple of three or one less than a multiple of three, you get a solid line. ...


3

Ideally the default values of Unicode characters math classification woudl be specified by Unicode, just as the default classification as letter or non-letter and case changing properties are specified. Unicode has a technical report http://www.unicode.org/Public/math/revision-14/MathClassEx-14.html Which lists these it is not currently formally part of ...


5

I see no reason for avoiding textcomp. Anyway, \texttt{\fontencoding{OT1}\selectfont\symbol{13}} produces the straight quote in typewriter type. You can see the full set of characters in the OT1-encoded typewriter font with \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fonttable} \begin{document} \xfonttable{OT1}{\ttdefault}{\seriesdefault}{\shapedefault} \end{...


8

whatever is defining \r is incorrect and breaking latex so you should report a bug even if you can not change it. Use \let\temp\r before importing the bad definitions and put \let\r\temp after them to restore \r. You could of course redefine \AA but \r is an encoding specific command so it is (re)defined if you switch encodings such as \usepackage[T1]{...


0

You can simply use brackets around one of your < or > symbol to avoid merging it with the second one. For example <{<}My text{>}>.


-1

This looks very much like \Updelta (\usepackage{ upgreek }) As you can see here, when compared with the standard Delta, the Updelta has an italic look to it.


1

A TikZ answer; you could personalize the appeareance passing TikZ style commands in the optional argument. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \newcommand{\myarrow}[1][]{% \begin{tikzpicture}[#1]% \draw (0,0.7ex) -- (0,0) -- (0.75em,0); \draw (0.55em,0.2em) -- (0.75em,0) -- (0.55em,-0.2em); \end{tikzpicture}% } \begin{document} \myarrow ...


2

By "resizing" the summation symbols, I assume you want to enlarge them, so that they have the size used in display-math environments. This may be achieve most directly by placing \displaystyle directives ahead of \sum macros that occur in inline-math environment. This works for \int, \prod, and other so-called variable-sized operator symbols as well. ...


3

\ding is not designed for math mode, if you use \newcommand*{\fnsymbolsingle}[1]{% \ensuremath{% \ifcase#1% \or *% \or \mbox{\ding{71}}% \else \@ctrerr \fi }% } You get a symbol not a G The Gamma in your error example is due to the fact that tex recovers from the negative char code by using ...


1

Try this: \documentclass{article} \makeatletter \def\rightarrowfill{\m@th\mathrel-\mkern-6mu\cleaders\hbox{$\mkern-2mu\mathord-\mkern-2mu$}\hfill\mkern-6mu\mathrel\rightarrow}% \def\circledrightarrow{\put(14,2.5){\circle{10}}{\ooalign{\hb@xt@30\p@{$\rightarrowfill$}}}}% \makeatother \begin{document} $\circledrightarrow$ \circledrightarrow \end{document} ...


2

With traditional methods: \documentclass{article} \makeatletter \newcommand{\circlearrow}{}% just in case \DeclareRobustCommand{\circlearrow}{% \mathrel{\vphantom{\rightarrow}\mathpalette\circle@arrow\relax}% } \newcommand{\circle@arrow}[2]{% \m@th \ooalign{% \hidewidth$#1\circ\mkern1mu$\hidewidth\cr $#1\longrightarrow$\cr}% } \makeatother \...


5

A simple TikZ version: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \newcommand{\arrowcircle}[1][]{% \begin{tikzpicture}[#1] \draw[->] (0,0ex) -- (2em,0ex); \draw (1em,0ex) circle (0.7ex); \end{tikzpicture}% } \begin{document} Some dummy text \arrowcircle[blue,line width=0.8pt] continues here! \end{document}


3

Since it is not exactly clear if you want a normal "Y" or a fraktur "Y", I provide both... (note that these are designed to take up the same space as an unadulterated "Y" or \mathfrak{Y}) The stoke elevation can be adjusted with the first argument of \stackengine. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{stackengine} \def\strokeY{\...


2

Since this version draws a symbol in the text area, I commented out the code for the text area (but left it there in case anyone wants to fix the american not port). \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{circuitikz} \makeatletter \pgfdeclareshape{inverter} { \anchor{center}{\pgfpointorigin} % \anchor{text}{% this is used to center the text in ...


0

Initialisation Code: \def\therefore{\boldsymbol{\text{ } \leavevmode \lower0.4ex\hbox{$\cdot$} \kern-.5em\raise0.7ex\hbox{$\cdot$} \kern-0.55em\lower0.4ex\hbox{$\cdot$} \thinspace\text{ }}} And can then be called on using: \therefore Which renders as:


1

You can also use: $\displaystyle{\lim_{x \to \infty}}$ It's in the inline mode, plus the limit is placed underneath.


5

You can find the definitions employed by the paper's author by downloading the source file from arXiv. Those two symbols are there defined as: \newcommand{\DD}{\Delta\!\!\!\!\Delta} \newcommand{\Grad}{\nabla\!\!\!\!\nabla} Note that this might not be the best way to define symbols like those -- it's just the way used by the author -- and other answers ...


3

Run with xelatex or lualatex: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmathfont{XITS Math} \def\dDelta{\upDelta\mkern-10mu\upDelta} \def\dNabla{\nabla\mkern-10mu\nabla} \begin{document} \Huge$\dDelta$ and $\dNabla$ \end{document} If you want the bold characters use \mbfDelta and \mbfnabla instead.


5

Here's a possible workaround if the symbols aren't available: Use the relevant symbol, say \Delta with negative kerning, say, \mkern-12u and the same symbol again. The kerning value is just a guess and can be changed of course. The package bbold provides a blackboard letter symbol for \Delta, but this looks different and is probably not desired. The ...


4

unicode-math maps TeX names to Unicode and Unicode decided that these were just stylistic variants so there is only one slot, U+210F. That means there is only one glyph in many Unicode fonts as well, although of course a font can offer multiple variant glyphs for the same Unicode slot. the mappings from the ISO entity sets as used in MathML and HTML have ...


5

\theta is defined in math mode which is why TeX makes the announcement $ inserted. If what you type is indeed a formula, surround it with $: $(x, y, \theta)$ If it is normal text, the correct input depends a bit on whether you use (normal) (La)TeX or e.g. XeLaTeX (or other compiler that understands unicode input). XeLaTeX allows for direct Unicode input ...


1

You need math mode: $(x,y,\theta)$.


3

I have found myself in a similar situation, previously, and I was able to solve the problem in this way: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,color} \usepackage{booktabs} \usepackage{listings} \lstdefinelanguage{NeoIDL}{ sensitive = true, keywords={}, otherkeywords={% Operators >, <, == }, keywords = [2]{module, resource, ...


3

A very 'baroque' style psvectorian symbols (No, I don't use them personally!) Compile with --shell-escape enabled or compile with latex 'only', since it uses PostScript based graph drawing. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{psvectorian} \usepackage{auto-pst-pdf} \usepackage{blindtext} \begin{document} \blindtext \hfil\psvectorian[scale=0.2]{60}\hfil ...


4

Common esp. in old books is the hedera ❦ (u+x2766) or turned hedera ❧ (u+x2767), newer books often use an asterisk * or triple asterisk (asterism) ⁂ (u+x2012). Edit as hinted by comment: How to correctly enter depends on the compiler you use. Cf. How to easily use UTF-8 with LaTeX? and related questions.


20

Thought I'd have a go ... Using Drawing on an image with TikZ, I took your "desirable" krul symbol and drew on it until I had something that looked fairly similar. I used the hobby package to define the béziers rather than fiddling with control points (to avoid recomputing the path each time the symbol is used, I used a nifty feature of the hobby package ...


2

Here are some fonts which you could use with help of Lua- or XeLaTeX: % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} \setmainfont{Arial} \symbol{"20B0} \setmainfont{Cambria} \symbol{"20B0} \setmainfont{Consolas} \symbol{"20B0} \setmainfont{Courier New} \symbol{"20B0} \setmainfont{Dejavu Sans} \symbol{"20B0} \...


3

Have a look at http://detexify.kirelabs.org/classify.html, a VERY useful site!


0

I think you can go with an inverted ampersand, I made it lowered a bit, too: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,amsmath} \DeclareRobustCommand*\krul{\text{\scalebox{-1}[1]{\raisebox{-0.7\dp\strutbox}{\&}}}} \begin{document} \section*{Hello, world \krul} Hello, world \krul \end{document}


9

In general, one should be able to store a symbol before it is overwritten by a package like in the following example: \documentclass{article} \let\olddiv\div \usepackage{physics} \begin{document} $\div \quad \olddiv \quad \divisionsymbol$ \end{document} Specific to physics, the package already does this using the macro \divisionsymbol.


27

The marvosym package has a symbol called \Denarius. The package documentation says, "The \Denarius symbol is also known as the correction sign “Deleatur”." The deleatur (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dele) is a proofreading symbol that would seem to be the counterpart to "stet". In fact, the topic of the correspondence of deleatur and krul was discussed ...


26

If you are using pdfTeX then you can use \pdfliteral which draws the desired character directly. For example: \def\krul{\leavevmode\hbox{\lower2.5pt\vbox to10pt{}\kern1.8pt \pdfliteral{q 1 j .7 0 0 .7 0 0 cm -2 1 m 3 2 4 5 4 7 c 4 9 3 10 2 10 c 1 10 0 9 0 7 c 0 3 5 2 5 0 c 5 -2 2 -3 1 -3 c S Q}\kern4.5pt}} aha \krul. \bye ...


8

Free Serif has your desired glyph. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \newfontface\DejaVuSans{DejaVu Sans} \newfontface\FreeSerif{Free Serif} \def\Fhook{\mbox{\DejaVuSans\char"0191}} \def\digamma{\mbox{\DejaVuSans\char"03DD}} \def\mbfdigamma{\mbox{\FreeSerif\char"1D7CB}} \begin{document} \Fhook \digamma \mbfdigamma $\Fhook \digamma \mbfdigamma$ \...


17

I created the symbol using tikz. I chose to scale the krul to about a letter size, but one can of course change this. Here's the code: \newcommand{\krul}{ \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=0.095] \clip(2.8,0.95) rectangle (6.3,4.9); \draw[very thick,color= black, ] (2.916,1.685) ..controls %0 (3.100,1.594) and %1 (6.104,3.990) .. %2 (5.061,4.437) .....


0

First option (with STIX) \documentclass{article} \DeclareFontEncoding{LS2}{}{} \DeclareFontSubstitution{LS2}{stix}{m}{n} \DeclareSymbolFont{arrows3}{LS2}{stixtt}{m}{n} \DeclareMathSymbol{\saizouimplies}{\mathrel}{arrows3}{'053} \begin{document} $A\saizouimplies B \rightarrow C$ \end{document} Second option (with NewTX) \documentclass{article} \...


5

This character is only available if you also load the tipx package. So you should use: \usepackage[T1]{tipa} \usepackage{tipx} This is documented, but easy to miss in the documentation. The list of symbols in the tipx package is given in Appendix B. In the introduction to the Annotated List of Symbols (Appendix A) the following line shows up: In the ...


4

You simply need $\text{SAR}=\displaystyle\int_{\mathit{campione}}\dfrac{\bf{\sigma}(r)|\bf{E}(r)|^2}{\bf{\rho}(r)}\,dr$, if it really is an inline, not displayed, math. If not, a solution may be as follows: \[ \text{SAR}=\int_{\mathit{campione}}\dfrac{\bf{\sigma}(r)|\bf{E}(r)|^2}{\bf{\rho}(r)}\,dr \] Using \bf in LaTeX is not recommended. You have, e.g....


13

Putting your example into a small TeX document (cos corrected to \cos) \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ \ddot{x} + \delta \dot{x} + \alpha x + \beta x^3 = \gamma \cos(\omega t) \] \end{document} you have It is easy to see that \alpha, \beta and so on generate Greek letters, \dot and \ddot provide "accents" that denote the first and ...


4

\QPCSymbols doesn't take an argument, it is a switch. So with \QPCSymbols{\XeTeXglyph 32} you are actually activating your font for the rest of the document and as it hasn't much glyphs you don't see anything. Move the brace before the command to group the effect: {\QPCSymbols\XeTeXglyph 32}


2

Define properly a mathchar for the reverse exclamation mark; for instance \DeclareMathSymbol{\revexcl}{\mathclose}{operators}{'074} and use $n\revexcl$ which will also change size in superscripts and subscripts. If you want to be able to input !`, it's possible with some tricks. \documentclass{article} \DeclareMathSymbol{\revexcl}{\mathclose}{...


1

I use {\scriptstyle \text{\rm !`}} General hint: find someone who did what you want on the arXiv and download the source file :)



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