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0

Other answers didn't work for me and since I can't comment, this is how I did it: I added a -fmt=yourfmtfile option in the external/system call option. This is how my main file begins: %&preamble \usetikzlibrary{external} \tikzset{external/system call={xelatex -fmt=preamble.fmt \tikzexternalcheckshellescape -halt-on-error -interaction=batchmode -jobname ...


0

A PSTricks solution using the pst-circ package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pst-circ} \def\Node(#1)#2{\rput(#1,0.8){#2}} \begin{document} \begin{pspicture}(9.2,1.35) \psset{arrows = *-*} \pnodes(0.1,0.5){A}(3.1,0.5){B}(6.1,0.5){D}(9.1,0.5){E} \resistor[labeloffset = 0](A)(B){$R$} \coil(B)(D){$L,r$} \capacitor(D)(E){$C$} \Node(0.1){A} ...


5

I was going to post a starting point, but at that point (sorry) I was almost done so I just finished it, not to mention this was your first post (please try to provide at least a code attempt and/or some data next time). Anyway, I'm not sure if the plots are exact because some lines "mix" in your graph and I don't know which goes where, but the end result ...


0

The comment by John Kormylo put me on the right track. The key is to make the legend refer to the third plot only by issuing forget plot to the two previous ones. The following works: \begin{axis} \addplot[name path = upper, draw = none, forget plot] {5 + rand}; \addplot[name path = lower, draw = none, forget plot] {-5 + rand}; \addplot[fill = ...


0

You can use a <style list> value for the vgrid key to draw a grid line only once per week, like this: vgrid={*{6}{draw=none},dotted}, The <style list> is cycled through as we move left to right through the Gantt chart, and the *{<num>}{<style>} works just like in tabular preambles for repeating elements. So the line of code above ...


2

Judging from the TikZ tag I'm assuming that you are using pgfplotstable with my crystal ball. Then you need to make sure that the column separators are not used inside the entries or they are covered with brace pairs as David Carlisle noted. Here is an example (though admittedly I wouldn't use it as is since it needs some cosmetics) ...


2

Here's a pstricks solution. The graph box in the fourth quadrant is included as a zoomed.epsfile via \epsfbox (\includegraphics doesn't work, for some reason): \documentclass[11pt, pdf, x11names]{standalone} \usepackage{pstricks-add} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{changes, stackengine} \setstackEOL{\\} \input{binhex} \begin{document} ...


2

From showed your desired picture, I gues that you looking for something like this: This picture I obtain with: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[letterpaper,textwidth=8.5in,textheight=11in]{geometry} \usepackage{lscape} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{fadings} \tikzfading[name = fondu, left color = transparent!0, ...


3

Since it is a tree, you should have a forest... \documentclass[tikz,border=5pt,multi]{standalone} \usepackage{forest} \begin{document} \begin{forest} delay={ for tree={ grow'=0, l sep+=50pt, circle, minimum width = 2.5pt, fill, inner sep = 0pt, parent anchor = center, child anchor ...


5

You can simply randomize the lengths of rising and falling edge locations \documentclass[tikz]{standalone} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \draw (0,0) --(1,0)|- ++(rnd,1) \foreach \x in {1,...,10}{-|++(rnd,-1) -| ++(rnd,1)} -| ++(rnd,-1); \end{tikzpicture} \end{document}


1

The positioning feature of pdfTeX needs to know the paper height and uses \pdfpageheight for this purpose. The \pdfpagewidth and \pdfpageheight are usually not set if pdfTeX is used in PDF mode. The DVI format has no concept of a paper/page/media size. The driver pgfsys-xetex.def contains a workaround: \ifx\paperheight\@undefined \else ...


1

A MetaPost solution, for whom it may interest, inserted in a LuaLaTeX program. The factorial function for real values is defined, as usual, with the Gamma function. I've picked up the MetaPost definition of this function from Anthony Phan's mps package, which I've just discovered. (Not available on CTAN yet.) See also this more detailed presentation of ...


1

The easiest way is to add these two lines after \tkzTabVal in your code: \tkzTabVal{1}{3}{.25}{}{$-$} \tkzTabVal{1}{3}{.75}{}{$+$}


1

Is this what you like to obtain? \documentclass{amsart} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc,angles} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[ every node/.style={align=center}, pin distance=17mm ] \coordinate (O) at (0,0); \draw (O) circle (3); \draw (O) -- (0:3); \draw (O) -- (90:3); \draw (O) -- (216:3); \draw (O) -- ...


3

I changed your base code a bit because it was easier for setting the steps in the sheet. If you have any doubts, just ask me in the comments. I wanted to set the top nodes using a \foreach and I was almost there, but unlike the numbering above, the top-top nodes have no logic in their succession, if you know what I mean, so I couldn't think of a rules to ...


8

Your analysis is right, factorial or ! only support integer numbers, the decimal part of real numbers is truncated. The following example defines a function facreal, which uses the Gamma function to calculate the factorials with real numbers as argument, see extensions of the factorial in Wikipedia and approximations for the Gamma function (Wikipedia). ...


2

Use \begin{frame}[fragile]....


2

Library calc is already loaded, then the middle (or any point) between (po1) and (po2) is easy: ($(po1)!0.5!(po2)$) Points between (po1) and (po2) are specified by a number between 0 and 1. 0 means the first point and 1 the second point. Also negative values or values greater than 1 can be specified to get points outside on the line, defined by (po1) and ...


2

How about adding \path (po1) -- (po2) coordinate[pos=0.90] (btw1a2); \draw[orange] (btw1a2) -- (7.23,8); at the end of the picture. You can change pos=<position> to any value between 0 and 1 to get the desired point.


1

I can provide a new answer based on a new package named genealogytree. On the time of writing, the version needed is 0.90 (2015/05/22). This package was specifically designed to typeset such kind of diagrams. For auto-layout, a layered graph has to be used. Therefore, I put the grandchildren in one layer: \documentclass{article} ...


2

I can provide a new answer based on a new package named genealogytree. On the time of writing, the version needed is 0.90 (2015/05/22). This package was specifically designed to typeset such kind of diagrams: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[all]{genealogytree} \begin{document} \begin{genealogypicture}[ timeflow=left, % time flows from ...


3

I'm not sure if this is entirely what you're after, but I'm posting it as an answer for now because I had to correct other parts of your code for this to work, so it's easiest to show this way. I'll delete the answer if this is not an acceptable solution. A quick way to make this work as you're expecting is to simply put the full path of the key (for your ...


2

Here is a circuitikz solution. You may like the circuitikz input format but not like the shapes/sizes of the components; in that case, there are many options described in the package manual and in the code if you wish to explore and do some tweaking for your own circuit diagrams. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage[ europeanresistors, ...


4

I don't know circuittex, but here is a solution utilizing the tikz library circuits. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{circuits.ee.IEC} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[circuit ee IEC] \path node [contact] (A) {} ++(right:2) node [contact] (B) {} ++(right:2) node [contact] (D) {} ...


2

Here's a way to do it for anyone interested in using asymptote. unitsize(1inch); pair d11 = (1, 1.5); label("$D$(1,1)", d11, NW); for (int y = 1; y <= 8; ++y) { path p = d11; pair d; for (int x = 2; x <= 4; ++x) { d = (x, (9-y)/3.0); p = p--d; label("$D$("+string(x)+","+string(y)+")", d+(0,0.1), (3-x,0)); } ...


3

A short code with pstricks and etoolbox: \documentclass[pdf, x11names, a4paper]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[charter]{mathdesign} \usepackage{etoolbox} \usepackage{pstricks-add} \begin{document} \begin{pspicture}$ \psset{xunit=2.5, tickstyle=top, ticksize=6pt, tickwidth=0.6pt, labels=none, labelsep=4pt, ...


4

Another try with MetaPost, inspired by Thruston's solution, but using the zscaled operator of MetaPost which is in fact the complex multiplication. Also, I have incorporated it in a LuaLaTeX program, as I use to do. \documentclass[border=2mm]{standalone} \usepackage{luamplib, amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{mplibcode} beginfig(1); r = 1.3; ...


3

You can start with this and add/remove different items \documentclass[tikz]{standalone} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[c/.style 2 args={insert path={node[n={#1}{#2}] (n#1#2){}}}, n/.style 2 args={circle,fill,inner sep=1pt,label={90:$D(#1,#2)$}} ] \path (-2,4.5)[c={1}{1}]; \foreach\y in{1,...,8}{ \draw (n11) -- (2,\y)[c={2}{\y}] -- (4,\y) [c={3}{\y}] ...


0

I got it my own: Simply ad \newcommand{\pause}{ }inside the preamble to replace all occurences of \pause by a whitespace in the documenet.


2

You are using overlay, if you remove this it will flow with the text not above it. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{scrartcl} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} Some text above ... Some text above ... Some text above ... Some text above ... Some text above ... Some text above ... Some text above ... \begin{center} \begin{tikzpicture}[remember ...


3

Found it. Try this: \begin{tikzpicture} \foreach \x in {1,...,18} \draw[thick] (4.5,1.5) to [bend angle = 2*\x, bend left] (3+0.5*\x,-1) node [below]{\tiny\x}; \draw[thick, red] (4.5,1.5) to [bend angle = 36, bend left](3+0.5*18, -1) node [below right]{\tiny E}; \end{tikzpicture} you have: But with changing the red line with: ...


5

Does this do the trick? \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \usetikzlibrary{arrows.meta} \usetikzlibrary{intersections} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[aeang/.style={red,#1}] \draw[->] (-1,0) to node [auto]{$f$} (1,0); \draw (-5,-1) node(0)[label=below:{$v_0$}, circle,fill=black,scale=0.3]{}; \draw (-2,-1) ...


3

You can implement a slightly better control over your bend angle such that the homotopy is between zero and 36 degrees relative. Then you can use it for the in,out keys. The only change in the code is \foreach \x[evaluate={\xc={(36/17)*(\x-1)};}] in {1,...,17}{ \draw[thick, dashed] (4.5,1.5) to [out=\xc,in=180-\xc,relative] (3+0.25*\x,-1); } Note that ...


0

Compiling your code does yield something quite similar to what you've posted here. But we can get it closer. I don't have Minion, so I'm simply using Computer Modern. What you'd probably like to do is define a new column type, to clear up your \begin{tabular} line, and so that you only have to change it in one place if you decide you'd like the columns to ...


1

(Note: this solution uses one pass... but three compilations ! ;-)) Here is a solution using three documents and pdfpages. Compile these three documents in order to get your final booklet. First document with 8 pages A4 (book-pages.tex): \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \begin{document} \Huge 1 \newpage \Huge 2 \newpage \Huge 3 \newpage \Huge 4 \newpage ...


2

I found a solution. Adding the option trim axis left to the tikzpicture chops off everything left of the axis. Combined with \centering before the subfigure this aligns the plots nicely. \begin{subfigure}[t]{\linewidth} \centering \begin{tikzpicture}[trim axis left] \begin{axis}[my plot] ...


1

pdfpages can certainly do what you want, but it needs a little coaxing; it's not a simple job. I'm not sure about pgfpages. But I've found it difficult to focus on getting my document right when I'm also worrying about imposing the final pages into a booklet or signatures; it clutters up the code a lot. To avoid this problem, it's often useful to use a ...


1

This is not quite an answer to your question because I am not really giving you a one-step process but it might be of interest because it does give an easy way of doing what you want. I use pdfpages to do something like this. Rather than doing this by hand, and incorporating pdfpages into the tex file, I use the following bash function to massage the pdf ...


1

In this particular case, you can definitely save the value to use again. AFter your call to \pgfmathparse you can do something like \pgfmathparse{atan2(\y,\x)} \xdef\aaa{\pgfmathresult} Or as in your case \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \begin{document} \noindent \begin{tikzpicture} \node (A) at (0,0){}; \node (J) at ...


2

Here is a short code for an Archimedean spiral between two points (the equation was calculated) with pstricks: \documentclass[pdf, x11names]{standalone} \usepackage{pstricks-add} \usepackage{amsmath} \DeclareMathOperator\re{Re} \DeclareMathOperator\im{Im} ...


5

A combination of rotation and scaling does the job neatly in Metapost. prologues := 3; outputtemplate := "%j%c.eps"; beginfig(1); path re, im; re = origin -- right scaled 4cm; im = re rotated 90; drawarrow im; label.lft(btex $\mathop{\rm Im}(z)$ etex, point 1 of im); drawarrow re; label.bot(btex $\mathop{\rm Re}(z)$ etex, point 1 of re); z1 = ...


10

Here is one way to do this. The interesting part is the use of pic to draw your little squares by defining a new "picture" called mysquare. These squares take two arguments: the colour and the label. The arguments MUST be given as {#1, #2} or tikz will complain with cryptic error messages. In particular, note that there needs to be a space after the comma! ...


5

The radius, the start and end angles for the arc command can be calculated, see the following example. (Update:) For the red "spiral" line I have used the plot function with a polar coordinate. The length of the polar coordinate linearly increases with the angle going from point (z) to (a): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc} ...


2

Many thanks! I knew how to build the common color bar, just not how to force the scale to be common. Solution looks like this \begin{figure} \centering \begin{extikzpicture}[runs=2]{fig6} \begin{groupplot}[point meta min=4,point meta max=15, group style={group size=2 by 1, group name = ...


2

You can specify north and south when you draw the paths between the nodes. Output Code \documentclass[margin=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz-qtree} \usetikzlibrary{shapes,arrows,positioning} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=0.8, level distance=1.5cm, every node/.style={draw, thick, rectangle, minimum width=2cm, minimum height=1cm, ...


1

Unfortunately I don't think there is an automatic way (maybe it could be a feature request if not available), but your best bet might be to manually position a node and then manually add the entry. I tried various ways, but this seems to be the only way. Output Code \documentclass[margin=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{pgfplots} ...


3

You can use decorations \documentclass[tikz]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{decorations.markings} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \path[decoration={ markings, mark={between positions 0 and 1 step 0.1 with={\draw (0,0) circle (2mm);}} },decorate] (0,0) arc (90:-40:2cm); \end{tikzpicture} \end{document}


2

You have a typo. The key name is every loglog axis. Regardless of the code, don't remove the % at the end of lines in the code block. You will get spurious spaces otherwise.


1

I'm glad that meanwhile (when I was occupied with my regular tasks :-)) you find a solution for your problem. My proposition require more "hand work", but it is quit simple: \documentclass[margin=2cm]{standalone} \usepackage{pgfplots} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \begin{loglogaxis} [ xtick={2,95}, ...


2

If the given border is only an example to show what you want to do you could use the package pgfornament. Note that this package is not on CTAN but you can install it from here. Using scrlayer-scrpage the border could be added to one or more layer page styles. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[% margin=4cm %,showframe% to show the page layout ...



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