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This is done via transparency groups and relies mostly on PDF rendering so sometimes it might go awry. Here is an example that within the scope everything is as usual overprinting with respect to drawing order but the overall result is transparent with respect to the background. \documentclass[tikz]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{patterns} \begin{document} ...


0

[I'm assuming we are talking MetaPost rather than MetaFont]. You can do transparency in MetaPost by iterating over all the components of a picture and re-colouring them appropriately. Here's an example of a grid and simple transparent rectangle. prologues := 3; outputtemplate := "%j%c.eps"; beginfig(1); % parameters u = 1cm; ymax = xmax = 2.75; xmin = ...


1

tried it with this minimalistic approach: \begin{tabular}{ccc} \cellcolor{structure!80}{\textbf{soziales Interaktionssystem}} & & \\ \cellcolor{structure!80}{Myelinisierter Vagus} & \cellcolor{structure!50}{\textbf{Sympathikus}} & \\ \cellcolor{structure!80}{} & \cellcolor{structure!50}{} & ...


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If you are generating your pdf document from the tex document at the command line then any of the previous suggestions are viable. To decrease typing at the command line you can write a makefile to handle the transparency checks and then generate the pdf. If you really want to do everything from within the tex document you can try the bashful package or the ...


2

The fastest way to fix it is to replace dvipsnames by svgnames. Comment by percusse is roughly right. The actual problem is, RoyalBlue in dvipsnames is defined using CMYK model. While we expect linear interpolation in color blending, CMYK model is handled, according to PDF standard, by the following: The C, M, and Y components shall be converted to ...



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