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The collision happens because the of node is along the path between the t2 node and the control point you specify with south west:6. (See my answer to your question Drawing node arrows for more information about how these control points work.) You need to move the first control point so that the of node is out of the way of this path. It's pretty easy to ...


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I concur with cfr that you might want to rethink how much information you're putting on one page, particularly whether you really need the tree at the top that is then duplicated before the arrow. Here are the space-saving changes I made. They're all independent of one another, so you can tweak to meet your needs, but I think you will find that the line ...


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Well, you could do this but your readers will not thank you for it! It would be better to rethink how you are presenting the information (or print on A3). \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{tikz-qtree} \usepackage{tikz-qtree-compat} \newcommand\formula[1]{\ensuremath{#1}} \usepackage{ulem} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \Tree [.S [.DP ...


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You can use the powerful forest package; you can even leave the content calculations to the package: The code: \documentclass[border=5pt]{standalone} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{forest} \begin{document} \begin{forest} for tree={ parent anchor=south, s sep=2pt }, delay={for descendants={ if n=1 {draw,content/.wrap 2 pgfmath args= ...


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forest allows you to specify a tree using standard bracket notation. See my answer to an earlier question for an explanation of how to turn a tree into a specification using bracket notation. Other answers there cover other packages suitable for drawing simple trees (as specified in the question). So if you don't like forest, perhaps one of the others will ...


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Sorting out the colliding arrow from $t_2$ to \node (ue) {some company}; can be achieved by altering the anchor from which the arrow comes from. From +(south west:6) to +(south:3). A larger number can be used here if desired. This answer shows that \qroof is not appropriate here and \edge[roof]; can be used instead. I wasn't entirely sure how you wanted the ...


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This is a bug introduced into forest v1.09. It is fixed in v1.0.10, which is available on ctan. The bug is due to a leftover debugging statement, which issues a \typeout command, whose argument contains (after expansion) a \\ in the above non-working example. Now, this is normally not a problem: having \typeout{\\} in the main body of a document is just ...


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This version uses the experimental prooftrees package, which has been slightly updated to make it possible. The code requires version 0.08 of prooftrees or later (included below). This requires forest as the package is built on top of forest. It is primarily designed for typesetting logical tree proofs easily. One of the key issues there is to align line ...


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One option using the powerful forest package: The code (with explanatory comments): \documentclass[varwidth=30cm,border=4pt]{standalone} \usepackage{forest} \usetikzlibrary{calc} % The width of the [0,1] Intervals \newlength\IntervalWd \setlength\IntervalWd{5cm} % Style for the upper labels in the intervals \tikzset{ ...


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I am going to put in a plea on behalf of forest. Although forest is extremely flexible and powerful, it can also be used very simply. Like qtree, it uses a simple, concise syntax which 'reads like a tree' but I found forest's syntax a bit easier to learn. (However, this may be because I learnt qtree first.) Like tikz-qtree, it gives you all the power of TikZ ...


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For simple, non "graphical" tree you can use the dirtree package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{dirtree} \begin{document} \dirtree{% .1 debug. .2 filename. .2 modules. .3 module. .3 module. .3 module. .2 level. } \end{document}


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May I recommend forest in addition to standalone? It allows you to specify the tree more compactly, without reducing the font size quite so much. (I used \tiny only for the edge labels and \small for the nodes.) Moreover, you can automate the placement of labels and make them more readable, and reduce the amount of repetition in the form of explicit mark up. ...


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With forest you can generally do this quite nicely using the nice empty nodes style (page 52, example 81). However, sometimes it doesn't quite work that simply. Your tree is one such example. Nonetheless, it is possible to get the tree very nearly perfect to the point that I challenge anybody to know that the tree does not use the unadulterated form of nice ...


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Trees do well in forests... \documentclass[tikz,a4paper,border=5pt]{standalone} \usepackage{forest} \begin{document} \begin{forest} for tree={ math content, circle, draw } [C3 [, phantom] [i [, phantom] [j ] ] ] \end{forest} \end{document}



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