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4

Since each "node" of the tree has almost everything constant, except the labels, this is a perfect place for an application of pic (requires version 3.0.0 of PGF/TikZ); for further details, please see Section 18 Pics: Small Pictures on Paths of the pgf manual. The code (some explanatory remarks below): \documentclass[border=3mm]{standalone} ...


2

There are various things you might mean by 'missing nodes'. A Minimal Working Example of the kind of tree you have, together with an explanation of how you wish to adapt it would be invaluable. The following example shows three things you might have in mind: Node 2 is missing in a first sense: the branch simply continues without stopping to make the ...


4

Using forest, you can create a phantom element, which behaves as if there is an element there for layout, but isn't drawn. Example: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{forest} \begin{document} \begin{forest} for tree={circle,draw} [9 [5 [1] [,phantom] ] [7] ] \end{forest} \end{document} Which renders:


4

One option using TikZ and its tikzmark (to place marks at the beginning and end of where the brace should be) and decorations.pathmorphing (to place the brace with the text) libraries (compile two or three times for the code to stabilize): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xytree} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{tikzmark,decorations.pathreplacing} ...


1

Another alternative via tikz tree. Here an event style is defined for each node to have a circle shape. Code \documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc,positioning} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} [event/.style={circle,thick,draw,text width=0.6cm, text centered,font=\sffamily,anchor=north}, edge from ...


3

Using the forest package, you can define a style, which we will call here B, and then apply it to every tree: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{forest} \forestset{ B/.style={for tree={calign=last, circle,draw}} } \begin{document} \begin{forest} B [9 [6 [4 [3] ] [2] ] [5 [1] ] [7] ] \end{forest} ...


0

forest is another option to build syntactic trees. In it's documentation abstract you can read: Forest is a pgf/TikZ-based package for drawing linguistic (and other kinds of) trees. Its main features are (i) a packing algorithm which can produce very compact trees; (ii) a user-friendly interface consisting of the familiar bracket encoding of trees ...


1

An alternative via tikz Code \documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} [ % Children and edges style edge from parent/.style={very thick,draw=black!70}, level 1/.style={sibling distance=5.5cm, growth parent anchor=south,}, level 2/.style={sibling distance=3.5cm}, level ...


1

This type of diagram can be created using tikz-qtree by explicitly setting the distance of the leaf-nodes from the root of the tree. A minimum working example for this type of diagram would be: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{tikz-qtree} \begin{document} % >>> Specify the "frontier"/leaf-level distance from root: ...


4

With the powerful forest package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{forest} \begin{document} \begin{forest} for tree={parent anchor=south, child anchor=north}, s sep=30pt, [ [,draw,text width=3cm,edge label={node[midway,left=4pt]{$0$}}] [,shape=coordinate,edge label={node[midway,right]{$1$}} [,draw,text width=2cm,edge ...



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