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When you install fonts into a TEXMF tree, TeX needs various things in order to use them: The various files must end up in the directories TeX expects. In your case, this is already all in order. TeX must be able to find the various files when it looks. Since you installed into your personal tree, TEXMFHOME, this is straightforward: TeX will find them so ...


0

You have to activate 0 before absorbing the argument; I also present a fixed version of the reversed slashed zero macros. \documentclass[a4paper,11pt]{article} \usepackage[zw32010,boxed]{ticket}% for debugging \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{letltxmacro} \usepackage{pxfonts} ...


3

Here is a solution Edit just for example use \usepackage[scale=.9]{geometry} \documentclass{article} \usepackage[scale=.9]{geometry} \usepackage{array,longtable} \begin{document} \begin{longtable}{>{\ttfamily}l>{\ttfamily}r} gi|161129|gb|AAA29941.1| & MSGSRKFFVGGNWKMNGSRDDNDKLLKLLSEAHFDDNTEVLIAPPSVFLH\\ gi|29841157|gb|AAP06170.1| ...


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As a workaround, you can use the package unicode-math. You can see here the differences between unicode-math and mathspec. In short, mathspec is intended for replace some fonts in math mode with system fonts (which you are looking for), while unicode-math main purpose is use complete math OpenType fonts. Using unicode-math, you can set a complete math ...


3

The seqsplit package is done for that. Here is a little demo of the possibilities (which probably have nothing to do with what you really need). If you don't know it you also might take a look at the dnaseq package. I also give a demo of it \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage[showframe]{geometry}% ...


3

The seqsplit package is exactly for this. In the example I use the Bera Mono font, because the default monospaced font doesn't have a boldface version. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{beramono} \usepackage{seqsplit} \begin{document} \noindent\texttt{\seqsplit{% ...


1

Here are two ways: 1) with microtype's \textls macro, and the other, \spaceout, without any packages. I have wrapped those macros into \textttA and \textttB invocation forms. The \textls macro uses an optional argument to specify the compression or expansion, while \spaceout uses the values of \theLetterSpace and \extraWordSpace to modify the default ...



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