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10

I think the best way to proceed is to stop using \hline -- and, while you're at it, ditch all vertical bars -- and to use the line-drawing macros of the booktabs package. For the table at hand, \toprule and \bottomrule should be used. If, for some reason, you simply must use vertical bars (and hence can't use \toprule and \bottomrule), I suggest you load ...


10

I'd like to add our main project report, which was created the last semester at a 2-year technical college. Main Report as pdf (dropbox link) Stripped-down example/template (needs XeLaTex) (Note: This template bears some marks from being taken from a paper written under a constant time-pressure with multiple revisions, and was never meant to be shown off ...


10

The problem is not in diacritics, it is in LaTeX tables. You can give rows some vertical padding with the cellspace package, which ensure a minimal vertical distance between a cell and the above and below rules. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{array, cellspace} \setlength\cellspacetoplimit{3pt} ...


8

You can \usepackage{lmodern} to get a version somewhat in between. In particular, the ring on Å is a circle (though somewhat thicker than the original). The accents are less slanted as well, especially for Ő and Ű. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \begin{document} A\'A\AA ...


7

Insert a large \strut. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{table}[!h] \begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|c|c|} \hline {\Large\strut}\"Ostersund & \AA m\aa l & Oxel\"osund & Alings\aa s & \'Orlaith &O\'O\"O\H{O}\\ \hline \end{tabular} \end{table} \end{document}


3

As mentioned in some of the comments, the text editor you use and its configuration are crucial in making text readable or alienating. The stuff you can act on: Font. In my opinion, fixed-width fonts give the best results because the letters are evenly spaced across all lines, which makes it easier on the eyes (there is some kind of vertical symmetry), and ...


3

One can use lmodern, but redefine the functions \', \H, and \", though that may have some danger associated with it. As wipet points out, this approach breaks hyphenation, which in itself is enough to recommend against its use. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern,stackengine,scalerel,graphicx} ...


3

The fact you're using babel-french has nothing to do with the problem. Straight quotes are very rarely used in typography, so when you type the ' character, you get a curly glyph that serves both as a closing quote and as apostrophe. If you want a straight quote, you can use the glyph provided by textcomp. \documentclass{report} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} % ...


3

Well you can do it. But you need to remove the quote first from the list of reserved characters. But if you uncomment the l'enfer you will see why csquotes did put the character in the list (and so prevents you from using it as a \MakeInnerQuote character). I would advise you to avoid such tricks. They bite you when you don't expect them. Using \enquote ...


2

csquotes decides which type of quotation marks to use based on the language setting. For example, in British typography it is custom to have single quote marks as the outer quote, and double as inner quote marks. For American English it's the opposite. Hence, \documentclass{article} \usepackage[british]{babel} \usepackage{csquotes} \MakeOuterQuote{"} ...


2

OPTION 1: Row specific padding One can add a \stackgap to a given element of the line, which pads the element vertically by the amount of the optional argument (default 3pt). The MWE below shows 3 rows that have been padded with 1pt, 3pt, and 5pt, respectively. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine} \begin{document} \begin{table}[!h] ...


2

Here is a solution (I used erewhon, a clone and extension of Adobe Utopia). \documentclass{book} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{geometry} \usepackage[explicit]{titlesec} \usepackage{array, graphicx} \usepackage[tracking=true]{microtype} \usepackage{fourier, erewhon} \usepackage{lipsum}% just to generate text for the example ...


2

An important question to ask is, what do the subscripts represent? If "sub" is of the form i or j and serves to index elements of the vector named a, it's customary not to typeset the indices in bold. Thus, you'd write \mathbf{a}_i and \mathbf{b}_j. If, on the other hand, "sub" forms an integral part of the name of the vector itself, it's more common to ...


2

You can use the calligra font (see http://www.ctan.org/pkg/calligra and http://www.ctan.org/pkg/calligra-type1). A potential alternative is the use of Zapf Chancery (a widely available font, use the package chancery from the psnffss bundle: http://www.ctan.org/pkg/psnfss) that is probably cursive enough for you purposes.



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