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12

The choice between ragged right or justified typesetting depends on the nature of the text you have to set. A discussion about this is mostly off-topic for this site, but some TeXnical aspects are surely on topic. The algorithm TeX uses for breaking lines is equally good for both methods and can be tuned up to give a pleasing result: one can for instance ...


12

Your settings are never applied because in the first argument to \SetProtrusion you only specify the encoding. microtype will always try to load the best matching settings, and since settings for Charis SIL exist, they will be applied instead. Drawing from this answer, you can overwrite settings by first loading the configuration file and then redefining ...


8

There are lots of opinions on this theme, but for an automated typesetting system justified text is very much preferable. The reason is that high quality ragged-right typesetting (in German known as Rauhsatz) needs some human intervention to avoid some flaws that can easily occur, like Distracting "shapes" of the right outline Choice of unsensible line ...


6

You could try the following: \usepackage{bigfoot} \usepackage{perpage} \DeclareNewFootnote[para]{A} \MakePerPage{footnoteA} \expandafter\def\csname @makefnbreak\endcsname{\unskip\linebreak[0]} \makeatletter \let\@makefntext@orig\@makefntext \FootnoteSpecific{A}\def\@makefntext#1{% \noindent{\hbox{\textbf{\@thefnmark}\nolinebreak\ }}#1~\hss% } ...


6

As Sean mentioned in comment, it would look much nicer if set flushed to the left (ragged right). Here are two examples. One with \raggedright and one with \RaggedRight from ragged2e The second one allows hyphenation. % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage[top=0.7in, bottom=1.2in, left=0.8in, right=0.8in]{geometry} ...


5

From my master's thesis. In the background one can see some (dirty) nanoparticles Code: \titlehead{% \tikzexternaldisable \begin{tikzpicture}[remember picture,overlay] \node[inner sep=0,opacity=1] at (current page.center) {\includegraphics[height=\paperheight]{bgtitle.jpg}}; \begin{scope} %\path[clip,decoration={random steps, segment length=6pt, ...


4

If you absolutely need to do it by rotating characters to get that old-timey feel, the easiest way is probably to use the graphicx package's convenient commands, \rotatebox and \reflectbox. Because it's not clear to me whether you want rotated, reflected, or both, I do all three below. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} ...


4

There are certain problems with this question (and, thus, answer). The most important one is that you will need to make sure that the "starting point" of the spiral isn't near the beginning or ending of a line. However, with that caveat and relying on the clever answer you linked to, you could do this: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{tikz} ...


3

Since you are using scrextend package, why not use scrartcl directly? With the KOMA-Script features, this is a one liner \addtokomafont{disposition}{\raggedright}. Here's a full example (I also removed the parskip package, since that's an option of the scr packages, too). Also note that the optional argument in \setmainfont is after the name of the font ...


2

The primitive \over as used by \frac automatically switches styles. The \tfrac and \dfrac macros are for special cases to force text or display style. \ifinner does not test for text/display distinction so the solution is simple, replace all \ifinner \tfrac{..}{..} \else \dfrac{..}{..} \fi by \frac{..}{..} For your second question, I wouldn't use the ...


1

Here are all the fonts, I could find on my system. Just play around with those. % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{bbold} % all ten digits with \mathbb %\usepackage{mathbbol} % all ten digits with \mathbb %\usepackage{mbboard} % not working here, but should have your digits with \mathbb %\usepackage{bbm} % just 1 and 2 with \mathbbm, ...


1

Simple examples: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tcolorbox} \tcbuselibrary{skins} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} % manual p. 14 \newtcolorbox[auto counter]{advice}[1][Usage]{colback=blue!5!white, colframe=blue!75!black, fonttitle=\bfseries, title=Tip~\thetcbcounter: #1} \newtcolorbox{warning}[1][]{colback=red!5!white, colframe=red!75!black, ...


1

Research on whether readers prefer Knuth–Plass over the simple algorithm is not going to be as prevalent as research on whether readers' comprehension and speed is improved by it. The studies linked-to by Brecht Machiels are good examples of the latter; I know of no specific studies on the former.


1

Run with xelatex or lualatex \documentclass{beamer} \usetheme{Singapore} \usefonttheme{professionalfonts} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setsansfont{Verdana} \setmathfont{XITS Math} \begin{document} \begin{frame}{foo}{bar} Some text with the Verdana font \[ y=f(x)=\int_1^\infty \frac1x \mathrm{d}x \] \end{frame} \end{document}


1

There's a problem I don't get to understand. And it's the fact that if there are multiple atoms inside a \vec it gets recolocated. I comment a little bit here. Disclaimer: this is not fully correct (because, for instance, the prime gets recolocated), but the fact that sometimes \vec{{}<something>} looks better than \vec{<something>} annoys me. ...



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