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11

It just looks to me like a smallcaps L. \textsc{l} should do it! \documentclass{article} \begin{document} poly-\textsc{l}-lysine \end{document} One of the difficulties in starting off with *TeX is just learning what some of its features are called. It's a big world, so plan at least 30 minutes or so sometime soon just to read through a *TeX introduction; ...


10

Complete Source Code and Thesis Since I've got four more exams on my plate there was no time to tidy up the code and the way the chapter headings are written, they prevent the use of tikzexternalize. An image from my end-of-term-thesis and the .pdf above (sadly only two links can be posted as new user): It is mostly reverse engineered wherever I needed a ...


5

As said in the comments, I’d suggest to define a command for this. That way it is easy to change the appearance later (macro name taken from Joseph …). \documentclass{article} \newcommand\laevo{\textsc{l}} \begin{document} poly-\laevo-lysine \end{document} If the font doesn’t have small caps (and only then) one might use a scaled upper case L (using \...


4

If you want none of the abbreviations provided by foreign to be in italics, just do \renewcommand{\foreignabbrfont}{} after \usepackage{foreign}. If only selected abbreviations should not be in italics, you have to change their definitions manually. For instance, if \ie and \eg are to be printed in the same font as the context, add \makeatletter \...


3

Opinion based answer: For variables that have human readable names or are acronyms (somehow), I would prefer \text or a \DeclareMathOperator approach (or \mathit and \mathrm, depending on personal taste) If the symbols are used more than once, markup macros are a better way \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \DeclareMathOperator{\pdf}{pdf} \...


2

I wrote both my PhD thesis and presentation in LaTeX. Most images were directly created in LaTeX, using tikz/pgfplots. A particularity of my template is that it features one page turning animation on each side (hourglass on the left and a glider on the right). Both animations were also generated using LaTeX. The source code is available at GitHub1. Thesis ...


2

Here, I vertically downsize the text slash to the height of a \textsc{e} in the current font size. (note: since scalerel processes arguments in math mode by default, using a $/$ actually processes the slash in text mode). \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[osf]{Baskervaldx} \usepackage{scalerel} \newcommand\scslash{\stretchrel*{$...


2

you could use ...\begin{quote}\linespread{0.9}\finob} ... to reduce the baseline spacing to 90% of its previous value within the environment, although if you reduce it too much (to less than the actual space taken by the characters in the font) then TeX will not preserve equal spacing, and lines with descenders or capitals or accented letters etc will ...


1

You can use a command for the slash: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[osf]{Baskervaldx} \usepackage{xpatch} \newcommand{\textslash}{/} \makeatletter \DeclareRobustCommand{\textslashsc}{% \check@mathfonts {\fontsize{\sf@size}{\z@}\selectfont/}% } \xapptocmd{\scshape}{\let\textslash\textslashsc}{}{} \makeatother \begin{...



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