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7

The normal interword space for the current font is available as \fontdimen2\font You're mistaken in considering \hspace* as “non breaking space”: it's a “non disappearing space”. Here are two pretty similar definitions for your \Dash: \documentclass{article} \newcommand\Dash{% \leavevmode \unskip\nobreak\hspace{.5\fontdimen2\font}% \textemdash ...


7

I don’t know whether this is a group or a solo effort, but there are resources for typesetting Project Gutenberg books at www.pmonta.com/etext/, which links to the resources at www.sandroid.org/GutenMark/. And, as michal-h21 commented, Project Gutenberg itself often presents mathematical and scientific works as LaTeX files with the PDF output (e.g., Euclid). ...


6

There can be differences: consider \documentclass{article} \begin{document} $\det+\det\in\mathbf{VP}$ ${\det}+{\det}\in\mathbf{VP}$ \end{document} In the first case the spacing is wrong, because the + is interpreted as an ordinary symbol, because it doesn't make sense between two operators. In the second case the spacing is the same as if we said ...


5

Your question isn't very clear and lacks an example document, but this shows four different setting of teh text, standard justified, sloppy, ragged right and RaggedRight from the ragged2e package. As the text is so short it doesn't really show the differences well so I repeat the settings with a longer paragraph with the text repeated. It still doesn't ...


5

This answer will NOT wrap. Nonethless, proceeding... Here, I introduce \nunderline[]{}{}. The optional argument is the under-level for rule placement (relative to the prior placement). The first argument is the text, and the second argument is the color. The rule thickness is set with \rulethick and th relative spacing with \lunderset. Nesting is used ...


4

I am not a top user but the first thing I thought was - just like Jonas suggests - something like: \newcommand{\myword}{MyWorD} or: \newcommand{\MWD}{MyWorD} or the acronym package. Beware that TeX will ignore spaces after \myword, so \myword{} would be the way for typing it in your document to avoid this problem.


4

use the ngerman shorthands, then you can use "" to define a break point without a hyphen: \documentclass[ngerman,english]{article} \usepackage{babel} \useshorthands{"} \addto\extrasenglish{\languageshorthands{ngerman}} \begin{document} I have a name (blabla\_rest) that contains \_ sign. What is the correct way to break it? blabla\_""(new line)rest ...


3

We can exploit the fact that \em is a switch: \documentclass[a4paper, 12pt,twoside, openright]{memoir} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setdefaultlanguage{french} \setotherlanguage{english} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage[autostyle=true,french=guillemets,maxlevel=3]{csquotes} \DeclareQuoteStyle{english} {\mkfrenchopenquote{\guillemotleft}\em} ...


2

How about this? It creates a new (cs-)quote style named fquotes and a corresponding command named \myfquote. (I don't know if one can define csquote command immediately, however.) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{csquotes} \DeclareQuoteStyle{fquotes} {\em}{}{\em}{} \newcommand*{\myfquote}[1]{% \begingroup% \setquotestyle{fquotes}% ...


2

A most simple way to produce a latex looking doc in word is simplified into steps. Use Century font Refer an original latex document(e: if you are working on a project report, then collect a latex made project report)--- and then type the words exactly in same place as in latex doc... with almost same font size, orientation , position, margin etc. Save it ...


2

Here's a completely different approach that DOES allow line-wrapping, but not paragraph or page breaks. It is also forced to turn off hyphenation. It uses the censor package to create the underlining (by setting \censorruleheight and \censorruledepth), and it uses a \Longunderstack to stack the different threads at the proper spacing (based on result at ...


1

As long as you don't need mathematical typesetting, you actually can find better than TeX with Heirloom Documentation Tools. Not only does it provide Knuth's algorithm for formatting paragraphs; it also allows to compute spacing by mixing three systems (interletters spacing, interwords spacing, imperceptible change in the shapes of the glyphs). Thus you can ...


1

As egreg says, it can't be done in a generalized way. And in this answer, I don't have merriweather font, so I just demonstrate the technique (and exaggerate the effect) on the standard CM font. One can locally achieve what you ask by making - active; however, that breaks many, many things, because it means the negative sign has been redefined. So the ...


1

You could make the _ character active and define it to be \textunderscore in text mode, with a possible line break point after it, while keeping it to be the subscript character in math mode: \documentclass{article} \begingroup\lccode`~=`_ \lowercase{\endgroup \protected\def~{% \ifmmode \sb \else \nolinebreak\hspace{0pt}% allow ...



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