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Please see the comments to the original post. To summarise, \includepdf was the real bottleneck, and compile time had little to do with the packages included. Using the option draft or commenting out the \includepdf greatly reduced compile time. Thanks to all those who helped me find this workaround in order to reduce compile time while working on the ...


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The key information in the accepted answer is: load Unicode Math font (UnMaFo) as family 2 and the same font as family 3. The TeX engine (XeTeX or LuaTeX) re-calculates appropriate fontdimens for family 2 and family 3 from UnMaFo when these families are set. After understanding this, I am able to do simple plain TeX macros for unicode math. I did this in ...


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unicode-math should be loaded after all font-packages (well, packages, that load fonts as well, like amsmath etc.) are loaded, to provide the corresponding changes. The unicode-math package states (see section 3 Getting started): Load unicode-math as a regular LATEX package. It should be loaded after any other maths or font-related package in case it ...


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In the first case (an 8-bit engine), the set up \newunicodechar{∫}{\int} uses active characters to make the multi-byte sequence ∫ expand to the control sequence \int. It is that which is therefore important. A quick \show reveals that \int expands to \intop\nolimits and that \intop is defined (\mathchardef) as \mathchar"1352. That's then the 'raw' ...


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You don't need map, enc, tfm, vf. xetex has the necessary code to extract the information built-in, for luatex you need a fontloader like e.g. luaotfload. You normally also don't need fd-files. fontspec tries hard to guess which font or font feature is needed for some font shape and then builts the NFSS-structure on-the-fly. But it can fail, that's why ...


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In classical TeX a number of math mode fonts are used to supply the output glyphs based on the input, and as observed in the question the relevant \mathcode of the input token. In contrast, when using a Unicode math mode font only one font is used to supply all of the glyphs. As such, rather than the limited number of slots available in a TeX font there are ...


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classically ! is mathclose but unicode math sets it as mathpunct which makes two adjacent ones have \thinmuskip between them. You can use {!}{!} to avoid that. Unicode has a !! character which unicode-math makes available as \Exclam but unfortunately it's not in this font, the log shows Missing character: There is no ‼ (U+203C) in font ...


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Care needs to be taken when identifying the source/cause of the difference in output. For sure, \documentclass{standalone} \begin{document} $v_{\mathrm{eff}}$ \end{document} can be compiled with both pdfLaTeX and LuaLaTeX. Importantly, it produces identical results with respect of the relative position of the subscript term, irrespective of whether ...


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I don't know why Latin Modern Roman is not recognized, perhaps it's not correctly installed as a system font. For getting the “traditional” calligraphic and blackboard fonts you can use the standard setup. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % should go before unicode-math %\usepackage{fontspec} % already loaded by unicode-math ...


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Until the range feature is fixed, you can use an indirect redefinition: \documentclass{article} % Mathematics \usepackage{amsmath} % Font \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage[math-style=ISO,bold-style=ISO]{unicode-math} \setmathfont{Latin Modern Math} \AtBeginDocument{% \let\umathpi\pi \renewcommand\pi{\symup\umathpi}% } \begin{document} \begin{gather} ...



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