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1

I believe that the right way to use a sans serif font for operators with the unicode-math package is the following: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \ExplSyntaxOn \makeatletter \renewcommand{\operator@font}{\um_switchto_mathsf:} \makeatother \ExplSyntaxOff \begin{document} $\sin{x}$ \end{document} This will not work unless you use ...


3

You can change the value like this (see also Overline thickness and the documentation of luatex for more commands): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmainfont[Ligatures=TeX]{Linux Libertine O} \setmathfont{Latin Modern Math} \setmathfont[range=\mathup]{Linux Libertine O} \setmathfont[range=\mathit/{latin,Latin,num}]{Linux Libertine O ...


7

The use of math alphabet commands in unicode-math is somewhat broken there are open issues at github which mentions \mathit but \mathrm is the same. You can redefine \mathrm to use the Roman text font as follows: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmathfont{Latin Modern Math} \setmathfont[range=\mathup]{Latin Modern Roman} ...


0

My solution is a little easier and a lot sketchier. The symbols appear as accents in the tipa package (which works in textmode), so when used as punctuation they had questionable spacing, which I modified using equally questionable methods: \usepackage{tipa} \newcommand{\lquine}{\textopencorner\hspace{-1pt}} \newcommand{\rquine}{$\,$\textcorner$\ $}


4

It seems to be a “design decision” (read “bug”) by the developers of Latin Modern Math. Here is the evidence; I typeset the character in text mode, so it can't be influenced by possible effects of automatic math spacing or vertical shifting. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmathfont{latinmodern-math.otf} ...


5

The following, stripped-down version of your example reproduces the positioning problem you've encountered: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{unicode-math} \begin{document} $x= \pm 1$ \end{document} The culprit appears to be the instruction \usepackage{unicode-math}, which loads the Latin Modern Math fonts. If the package isn't ...


2

It's due to the font you choose. You should use an other font if you dislike this sign. So with this font it's normal. Do you need the line : \setmathfont{latinmodern-math.otf} maybe you can reassign the base font only for the \pm sign, like you did for \int for example p.s. : I didn't know Vanilla TeX. My answer is correct for XeLaTeX, but I think it ...


1

Try giving (say) \setromanfont{Bitstream Charter} \setmathfont[range=\mathup/{num}]{Courier New} \setmathfont[range=\mathit/{latin,Latin,greek,Greek}]{Bitstream Charter} This will produce numbers in Bitstream Charter font in normal text and Courier New font numbers in Math mode.


2

I found a solution that works for me. I started playing around with version=bold, as David suggested, but that kept turning all my math mode text bold. In the end I switched from file names to system font names. (I wanted to avoid that initially, since I am working on the same document from several different machines.) With system font names, \boldmath ...


1

Using the package amsbsy and \pmb seems to get the boldmath. \documentclass{minimal} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{unicode-math} \usepackage{amsbsy} \setmainfont[% Ligatures=TeX, BoldFont=LinLibertine_RB.otf, ItalicFont=LinLibertine_RI.otf, BoldItalicFont=LinLibertine_RBI.otf] {LinLibertine_R.otf} \setmathfont{texgyrepagella-math.otf} ...



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