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7

run with xelatex or lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{ruby} \renewcommand\rubysep{.05ex} \renewcommand\rubysize{0.2} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Arial Unicode MS} \newcommand\神{\ruby{神}{かみ}} \begin{document} \神 \end{document}


7

The problem is in the fact that babel-czech makes the hyphen a shorthand character, but soul has no check for an active -; the result is that as many characters at the end are mangled as there are hyphens in the text. Here is a workaround using regexpatch: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} ...


6

If you're using LuaTeX or XeTeX as engines you surely can define \神 to do that task. Of course you must remember to have a nonletter after \神 or to change the category code of 神 to 12. What happens with pdfTeX as engine? That \newcommand would give an error: ! LaTeX Error: Missing \begin{document} because \newcommand can't define macros with parameter ...


5

I am sorry about my non-LaTeX answer but I would signify that we can treat with UTF-8 codes as one token i normal 8bit pdftex and we can avoid the complications shown in David's and egreg's answers. You can try to create the UTF-8 encoded file: \input lmfonts \def\<#1{{\bf#1}} f\<oo b\<öll €\<€ f\<{oö} f\< öo \bye and process it by ...


5

A general answer, covering also the cases of three and four byte UTF-8 characters; \<ö or \<{ö} is allowed. If a space creeps in, like in the last example, it is removed. Maybe a test for a control sequence should be added, in order to catch wrong input; as long as you have just characters or { after \<, it should be safe. \documentclass{article} ...


5

U+F817, U+F818 and U+F4A1 point to the private use area, so it's impossible to say what they should produce, because it's font dependent. Looking at your picture, the correspondence seems to be U+F817 is x U+F818 is y U+F4A1 is , So you can do \makeatletter \newcommand{\unicode}[1]{\@nameuse{unicode@#1}} ...


5

You have to use a font that has the required glyphs. They are in FreeSerif, for instance. Here's how you can use them directly, by hiding the font change in a macro: \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{newunicodechar} \setmainfont{Linux Libertine O} \setsansfont{Linux Biolinum O} \newfontface{\freeserif}{FreeSerif} % for the ...


4

▪ ▫ ▪ ▫ ▪ ▫ ▪ ▫ ▪ ▫ ▪ ▫ U+25AA and U+25AB


3

It is a bug in package appendix: Package hyperref uses \Hy@chapapp inside destination names at the place of the counter name. Then sections (class article) or chapters (class report or book) use the string "appendix" rather than "section"/"chapter" as counter name part of destinations in the appendix. Package appendix redefines \Hy@chapapp as \appendixname ...


3

For the line break at period, you can do as the follow: literate= {.}{}{1\discretionary{.}{}{.}}, Which does the line break at the ., however, it doesn't do it so beautifully. To tweak the output, have a look at this answer. This part of the answer tells you something: literate is some sort of hack to put unicode characters. Another solution could be to ...


2

I think the answer is no, you can't do this. According to page 25 of the Postscript Language Reference Manual There are three encodings for the PostScript language: ASCII, binary token, and binary object sequence.


2

You can add the following code before automatic generated text: \def\unicode#1{\csname U+#1\endcsname} \def\unidef#1{\expandafter\def\csname U+#1\endcsname} \unidef{f818}{{\bdot{\dot y}}} \unidef{f817}{{\bdot{\dot x}}} \unidef{f4a1}{,} \def\bdot#1{\vtop{\offinterlineskip \halign{\hfil##\hfil\cr$#1\vphantom y$\cr\noalign{\vskip1pt}.\cr}}} % the text ...


2

Left side: unicodes. Right side: unicode-math commands. Below: other possibilities (QED just yields a real square in Latin Modern Math, Cambria Math, Asana Math and TeX Gyre Pagella Math). % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{unicode-math} \begin{document} \setmathfont{xits-math.otf} \[\symbol{"025AA} ...


1

Probably this thread will help to solve part of your problem how-to-create-multilingual-english-japanese-bibliographies-with-biblatex, see the answer by PLK (almost at the bottom of the page.) Your bibliography should be structured in following manner: @article{HondaSuzuki2014, LANGID = {japanese} author = {本田, 太郎 and 鈴木, 次郎}, ...


1

At first I thought that with a comment was enough, but I think this deserves an answer. Since is something I learned rather late (a few weeks ago). listings is much more friendly if you use latin1 as input encoding. For instance, accents work without literate, that is, out of the box (and also non-breaking spaces). What could go wrong? I don't know. What ...



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