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0

I have found the same problem but none of the above answers solved it. In the end, I found the code \'{\i} in my .bib file. This was supposed to yield í but was producing a crazy unicode char that broke compilation. This .bib file was exported from CiteULike based on a reference that I entered mannually or copy-&-pasted from somewhere else. I suppose ...


3

Assuming that you have unicode input correctly declared either via \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} or using xelatex or lualatex then `` will ligature to “ and produce identical output. So the pros and cons are all about the human interface to editing, not about latex. Most latex users use ascii input as they have been using it for a long time, but even ...


0

Your example left the sans serif family unchanged so the main font loading is not affecting the result once you uncomment the declaration to switch to sans serif. latin modern sans as you saw, does not cover this range. TeX Gyre has a sans serif font Heros, but that drops the accented letters. But of the fonts I have easily to hand Arial and Sans Source Pro ...


2

For commercial fonts, many sites make you beg for information, even though one would expect salesmen to exhibit the opposite behavior. MyFonts supplies more information than most, allowing you to do an advanced search for fonts with Greek language support tagged “polytonic.” Both criteria are necessary, because searching for Greek in the “language support” ...


5

I think that rather than look at unicode-math it's more natural to look at inputenc's utf8 support (if your main interest is textual accented characters rather than math symbols). That maps Unicode input to classic latex markup. The base latex distribution has a file utf8enc.dfu that contains the mapping as far as it is implemented. As memory constraints ...


5

You can somewhat emulate Unicode also with Plain TeX; say you want to input ć and get \'c out of it. \catcode"C4=\active % 0xC4 is a two-byte prefix in UTF-8 \def^^c4#1{\csname\string^^c4#1\endcsname} \expandafter\def\csname\string^^c4^^87\endcsname{\'c} %%% add other UTF-8 characters having 0xC4 as prefix %%% Repeat for all other UTF-8 prefixes you need ...


2

You need an unicode aware engine to do it; macro packages like Plain cannot do it by themselves. Examples of unicode aware engines are xetex and luatex, and perhaps etex and pdftex with the enctex extension.


3

afaik, Metafont is designed to work only with 8 bit fonts, so you are basically out of luck. However, you can trick dvi drivers of the postscript family to produce unicode aware ps/pdf with the aid of enc files. So generate your font within the 8 bit range and prepare an enc file to feed the driver in due course.


3

This is not a complete answer to your question, but it’s too long for a comment. It’s my first attempt to address your questions (and probably my last for a while, until I get other work done…). There may be better solutions, and there may be mistakes in my attempt, because my experience with bidi is mostly for Arabic, and I know little about Hebrew and ...


1

It is not sufficient to set the input encoding. For correct uppercasing you also have to set TeX's internal encoding (which is in classical TeX and LaTeX identical to the font encoding) by choosing \usepackage[T1]{fontenc}


12

the issue is in the class file, which uses \uppercase for the case changing rather than \MakeUppercase. A fix: \makeatletter \def\@ucnt#1\thanks{\MakeUppercase{#1}\futurelet\@tempa\@ucnta} \makeatother The difference here is that \uppercase is a TeX primitive and can only case change 'native' input for the engine, whereas \MakeUppercase is set up to deal ...


0

MikTex Package Manager shows all the packages including ones which are not installed on the computer. In here for instance, ucharclasses package was not installed on my computer. But when I searched it in the MikTex Package Manager I could find it. So when I right clicked on it and opened the properties window it shows the files belong to the package (In my ...


2

We need to use \pdfstringdef \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec,hyperref} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage{french} \begin{document} \pdfstringdef\toto{tête} \hypertarget{\toto}{tête} \newpage \hyperlink{\toto}{tête} \end{document} Or better to patch some internal commands of hyperref: \documentclass{article} ...


1

Ok as nobody had written: this works \newcommand{\начать}[1]{\emph{#1}} \let\начать\begin \let\конец\end \newenvironment{стих}{\begin{verse}}{\end{verse}} Works out of the box, thanks to @David Carlisle for \let\xyz\begin tip


2

Not elegant, but it works for me: I just use my dumb solution and define a function for each character I need. What I have so far is (defun LaTeX-math-alpha () "Insert α" (interactive) (insert "α" )) (defun LaTeX-math-approx () "Insert ≈" (interactive) (insert "≈" )) (defun LaTeX-math-beta () "Insert β" (interactive) (insert "β" )) (defun ...


2

Your example doesn't work even with pdflatex, so it isn't really surprise that it doesn't work with tex4ht as well. Easiest solution to get non-european scripts working with tex4ht is to use helpers4ht bundle, in particular emulation of fonstspec package. helpers4ht aren't on CTAN yet, you need to install it yourself. Now back to your example, it is little ...


0

I found it. Instead of \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} I need to use \usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc} UPDATE! Too hasty. That handles the one-half character and the degree symbol, it does not handle Japanese Katakana.


2

This is the purpose of preview-latex. Here, with auctex 11.89, with the cursor on the math item, just type C-c C-p C-p and the editor displays the ζ .


12

∞ is U+221E so you want, for (pdf)teX \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{221E}{\ensuremath{\infty}}


4

You can use the cmtex10 font, that has several math symbols and is compatible with cmtt. The code below assumes you use the characters either in math mode or in Verbatim. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{fancyvrb} \usepackage{newunicodechar} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{cmtex}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{cmtex}{m}{n}{ <-> cmtex10 ...


3

It is only a matter of choosing the correct font, so it seems to me. I used Linux Libertine O as the main font and everything looks fine: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage{german} \setotherlanguage{greek} \setmainfont{Linux Libertine O} \begin{document} \textbf{Physik} : Naturlehre: aus griechisch φυσική ...


0

This still has some missing glyphs as I'm not sure what they are but it should give the idea: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage{german} \setotherlanguage{greek} \setmainfont{GFS Bodoni} \begin{document} \textbf{Physik} : Naturlehre: aus griechisch φυσική \begin{tabular}[h]{ccllll} \hline ...



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