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0

As stated by Andrew Swann in his comment above (thanks a lot!), biber is necessary as backend if UTF-8 is used, so the solution is the option backend=biber


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It seems that using backend=biber is causing the amazing slow down, I've asked a new focused question here to discuss this issue: Why does biber increase compilation time (pdflatex) dramatically? Performance comparison biber / bibtex8: Test setup my LaTeX document, limited to one long chapter by \includeonly, 98 pages with many many references, ...


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In absolute terms utf8 does slow down the processing as (if you have any non ascii characters) you have to handle 2 (or more) bytes rather than 1, and it can not possibly take less time to process two bytes than 1 byte. But unless you have millions of non-ascii characters and your document does nothing but write them out to files and read them back in ...


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The Unicode reference is a red herring really, for pdftex you would need a classic (256 character) font that has such a character. There may be such a font but it is simpler really just to use a graphic. best would be a scalable image. If you have a system font with it in, make a small pdf, but a bitmap image also works, I just drew one. You can then define ...


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I don't know the answer for first two questions, as I don't use XeTeX, but I want to provide option for the third question. Thanks to Arthur's code I was able to create basic package for unicode normalization in LuaLaTeX. The code needed only slight modifications to work with current LuaTeX. I will post only main Lua file here, full project is available on ...


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This is Greek, not Chinese-Japanese-Korean (which is what CJK stands for). \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[greek,spanish]{babel} \begin{document} \textgreek{τέχνη} \end{document} You can use Latin characters for inputting Greek, but using a well defined translitteration scheme: ...


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This happened to me when I did save my .tex file with utf8 but forgot to save also the .bib file with the same encoding (it was still in ANSI). Instead of returning back to ANSI on my .tex file I just opened the .bib file with Notepad++ and chose to convert to utf8. Then after compiling everything was working OK.


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Thanks to @UlrikeFischer, this is now solved; the answer was: Replace in (a local version of) T1-WGL4.enc one of the char names (e.g. /cedilla) by the char name you want to test (looks like /uniE025) and then look what happens. If you can see the glyph you will have to create a suitable tfm-file too. That's exactly what the embedded bash code does now: ...


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I just had a problem with this, and answers by @UlrikeFischer and @RD6137 are essentially correct, but I'll post a writeup here; although I'm not sure about the Hangul characters per se, I'll be focusing on "Unicode characters" and "hexcode" part of the question; all of this was tested with pdflatex. No German Umlaute or Eurosign - that's simple. ...


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I have spent a considerable amount of time to find why I suddenly get errors with TeXshop 2014 when mixing English, French and Romanian text. Romanian text was OK but French accents always gave errors. The reason was that I have put {inputenc} before {fontenc}. The following order ensures it works as expected and I can type French and Romanian accents ...


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Many of the applications I write have some connection to LaTeX. Either they create files that LaTeX inputs or they parse LaTeX code, so I've had to produce some mappings between Unicode and LaTeX commands. flowframtk is a graphical application that can export to .tex (or .sty or .cls) and Unicode characters entered into the graphical environment can be ...


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partial, and probably unsatisfactory, answer. unicode alone can't do everything. for example, if you want an integral from x=1 to \infty, unicode has the codes, but it isn't by itself able to position sub/superscripts or limits. so at a minimum, some sort of markup and composition facility is required. markup could as well be mathml as latex, but that's ...


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There are two issues at play here: Finding a font that has all the characters you need and places diacritics properly. Declaring the font properly. Finding a font As egreg pointed out, it's not clear from the question whether you actually want all these characters to show up in a monospaced font, or if you are simply using the verbatim environment so ...


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Use a font that supplies the glyphs: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Linux Libertine O} % or whatever \newfontfamily{\currencies}{FreeSerif}[Scale=MatchUppercase] \begin{document} {\currencies ден ₪ ₹ ع.د ₲ ฿ ₩ ¥ ؋} \end{document} A different approach (but just for single glyphs) that takes the glyph from the current font, ...


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Since you compile with XeLaTeX, you have a number of currency symbols in the font fontawesome. The package fontawesome helps using this font, unfortunately it defines commands for version 3.1 of the fonts, which had no currency symbols. You can download the latest version (4.3) of the fonts here and use the preamble of the following code; which defiines ...



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