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12

Package hyperref hyperref encodes correctly, but the options should be set after hyperref is loaded. Otherwise LaTeX expands the options the hard way and hyperref will only see the expanded garbage. \usepackage{hyperref} \hypersetup{ pdfauthor={Erwin Schrödinger}, } Extended example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}% utf8, for ...


0

If the dotted version \=i is not needed, then this can be redefined to provide the dotless version. This depends on the font encoding. The example shows it for font encoding T1: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \DeclareTextCompositeCommand{\=}{T1}{i}{\=\i} \begin{document} Ibn-S\=in\=a \end{document}


3

Just load pmboxdraw: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{pmboxdraw} \begin{document} \begin{verbatim} verbatim { ├ ─ └ } \end{verbatim} \end{document}


2

Unfortunately, this is not currently possible. Some glyphs could but used for multiple unicode slots. Note: It seems perfectly reasonable to create a function that acquires multiple code points, should the same glyph be used in multiple code points. Maybe someone will make this possible someday.


0

I see that I did not phrase my question correctly. But the answer was very helpful in that I learned that: \def\e{^^^^1401} where 1401 is the glyph (= upside down triangle, for the vowel e) was the way to indicate a reference to Unicode. Until now I only knew the \char definition, i.e (with Cork encoding) ff \equiv \char27 \equiv \char'33 \equiv ...


0

Notepad++: Default encoding for empty files seems to be ANSI, displayed in the status bar: The wrong result is easily visible. Diacritics are converted to regular latin characters. Encoding should be changed to UTF-8 without BOM: After copy-pasting again the same text, it is displayed properly:


0

TeXstudio: no issues are present. UTF seems to be enabled by default. The file encoding is displayed in the status bar.


1

TeXnicCenter: File should be saved for the first time through save as dialog: File -> Save As -> Encoding checkbox: select UTF-8: Now it should compile properly: The scenario described in the question seems to be a TeXnicCenter bug. (version 2.02)


0

It might be best to reword your question so I'm sure I am answering it (or at least what I think it is). I take the question as: a) I have a Unicode font of unknown mapping, b) How can I use particular glyphs from that font in LaTex without necessarily making it my main document font, c) More specifically how can I set macros to input the specific characters ...


6

This is much easier with xetex or luatex than pdftex. I'm on windows and seem to have a font Euphemia with this script (which I can not read, sorry) so I hope the following looks OK. I took a couple of lines from the site that you referenced and set them with xetex, firstly just copying the characters directly and secondly using tex macros with ASCCI ...


2

Define the square root symbol √ to behave differently in minted: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{unicode-math} \usepackage{minted} % uses minted 2.0+ \usepackage{etoolbox} \usepackage{newunicodechar} \newtoggle{inminted} \newunicodechar{√}{\iftoggle{inminted}{√}{\sqrt}} ...


1

I will give what I learned by trial and error. This is pertaining to Windows platform. ( I used the material given found here at the XeLaTeX wiki.) The trick is to use the fonts available in the system's font directory. (Windows7 provides Latha font for Tamil) and compile your source file with xelatex, not pdflatex! (For this in Windows platform, ...


4

Like Harish I would suggest to use utf8 instead of ucs/utf8x, but if for some reason you really need utf8x you must prerender the offending unicode character: \documentclass[a4paper]{report} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc} \PrerenderUnicode{ø} \begin{document} \tableofcontents \chapter{ø} \end{document}


1

Use \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} instead of utf8x \documentclass[a4paper]{report} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \begin{document} \tableofcontents \chapter{ø} \end{document}


3

xunicode sets up for these commands also some OT1 defaults, but the main point are accents commands. E.g. \DeclareEncodedCompositeCharacter{\UTFencname}{\M}{0322}{0322} % (Combining retroflex hook below) You can naturally redefine the command if you don't use it, but there is a tradition to use "one-char-commands" for accent commands and so I would never ...


3

Unicode's advantages As I see it, there are many advantages to using a Unicode font with XeLaTeX/LuaLaTeX, some of which are mentioned in answers to the above questions and in other places, notably Alan Munn's answers to How to use phonetic IPA characters in LaTeX and Preparing a text for conversion to LaTeX: How to convert "ejective stops" in ...


3

Yes, LaTeX will parse the left and right quotation marks correctly if you tell it to parse the input with UTF-8 encoding. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \begin{document} ‘Hello’ \end{document}



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