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3

CJKutf8 package is a part of CJK bundle, it is designed for documents in UTF-8 encoding only, and it actually loads CJK package internally. The main aim of CJKutf8 package is, to use utf8 option in inputenc package together with CJK package. That is to say, CJKutf8 patches original CJK package to make it work well with inputenc. And it loads inputenc ...


11

We can define a command to switch to a fallback font using fontspec. Then we can use newunicodechar to map the missing Unicode characters to a command that switched to the fallback font for those characters. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec, newunicodechar} \setmainfont{PT Serif} \newfontfamily{\fallbackfont}{Linux Libertine ...


4

The MinionPro font that comes with Adobe Reader does not have these symbols: In short, you can't use characters from a font that doesn't have those characters. This is therefore not a question about TeX, and you seem to acknowledge that in your question, asking if it "can really be true" that Adobe's MinionPro font doesn't have these symbols. I'm ...


0

It seems to be a bug in «version 29» of the fonts: if you download them from the fontsquirrel site, they work as expected.


0

I would recommend using XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX with a Unicode font that has the [⁼] symbol. In the example below, I chose Gentium Plus because its Greek alphabet matches its Latin/IPA symbols nicely. The easiest way to input IPA symbols is to use a keyboard layout, which are available for all platforms (see my answer to Accessing IPA characters when using ...


2

For completeness, here is a unicode solution: % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \newcommand*{\ipa}[1]{[#1]} \newcommand*{\tPalHook}{\symbol{"01AB}} \newcommand*{\tRetHook}{\symbol{"0288}} \newcommand*{\tRot}{\symbol{"0287}} \newcommand*{\tDental}{t\symbol{"02BC}} \newcommand*{\tUnaspi}{t\symbol{"02ED}} ...


6

Here is a basic approach that compiles with pdflatex. Since this Unicode glyph is not available through the tipa fonts or in the default, you can create it yourself. You might wish to do it differently than in the example (perhaps a smaller size or a different symbol). The newunicodechar package allows you to make a Unicode character into a control ...


3

In the very first lines of CJKutf8 it has: \RequirePackage[encapsulated]{CJK} So to your question in comment: CJKutf8 is newer than CJK. In discussions on CTeX forum, someone (ti8er) claims that CJKutf8 is able to handle punctuation marks. For example , cannot be at the beginning of a line and 「 cannot be at the end of a line. Moreover, characters in ...


1

I use a glyph called by index with a font I have, in this case XITS Math. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmainfont{TeX Gyre Pagella} \setmathfont{Asana Math} \newfontfamily{\test}{XITS Math} \begin{document} {\test\XeTeXglyph4491} $A\mathrel{\text{\test\XeTeXglyph4491}}B$ ...


4

The following code works using either LuaLaTeX or XeLaTeX from MacTeX2014: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Hoefler Text} \newfontfamily{\HTOrn}{HoeflerText-Ornaments} \begin{document} {\HTOrn \char"F043 \char"F044} \end{document} You could create a macro named, say, \SeparateTwoSections to simplify the insertion of this ...


1

This uses a command \afz{Overflow} which provides german style of "" - quotes. (afz stands for "Anführungszeichen", the German word for this ;-)) \documentclass{article} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage[babel,style=german]{csquotes} \newcommand{\afz}[1]{\enquote{#1}}% \begin{document} \tableofcontents \section{\afz{Overflow}} ...


3

You can always add a definition for character not yet set up. The main question is, what you expect it to do: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{200E}{Left-to-Right!!!} \begin{document} ‎$X$‎ \end{document}


10

Apparently, the program you used tells you the glyph index as a decimal number; with XeTeX you can access a glyph by index using \XeTeXglyph. I suggest a macro, instead of the raw primitive: \newcommand{\glyph}[1]{\XeTeXglyph#1\relax} so, after this, you can type Übers\glyph{191}rift Why a macro? Because there could be a similar trick with LuaLaTeX ...



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