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3

Just because it is there, here's a version which uses coffins to arrange and typeset the boxes. The syntax is identical to that specified in the question except that \cwrapper can take an optional argument specifying the horizontal distance between the larger box and the superscript and subscripts. Since this is optional, the OP's syntax can be used ...


3

Here's a version respecting the clumsy syntax you want. \documentclass{article} \makeatletter \newcommand{\cwrapper}[1]{% \leavevmode\check@mathfonts \begingroup\ignorespaces #1% \clement@wrap \endgroup } \newcommand{\crepeat}[1]{% \def\clement@repeat{#1}\ignorespaces } \newcommand{\csup}[1]{\def\clement@sup{#1}\ignorespaces} ...


4

The original syntax of the OP can be preserved with this formulation: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand*{\csub}[1]{_\textnormal{~#1}} \newcommand*{\csup}[1]{^\textnormal{~#1}} \newcommand*{\cnotation}[1]{#1} \newcommand*{\crepeat}[1]{\fbox{#1}} \newcommand*{\cwrapper}[1]{\ensuremath{#1}} \begin{document} \cwrapper{\crepeat{% AAA ...


0

An alternative solution which also need manual tweaking of final layout: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{array, makecell, multirow} \newcolumntype{P}[1]{>{\centering\arraybackslash}p{#1}} \newcommand\mrc[2]{\multirowcell{#1}{#2}}% #1 number of lines in the tallest cell \begin{document} ...


7

(simplified the answer to show both candidate solution methods in one go) Here are two candidate solutions. The first positions the sub- and superscript terms relative to the right-hand edge of the immediately preceding box, while the second ignores the height of the immediately preceding box. The main changes, relative to your code, are (a) making ...


1

You have already named the left plot. Set a name for the right too and use \begin{tikzpicture}[trim left=(first.south west),trim right=(second.south east)] Code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{blindtext} \usepackage{pgfplots} \pgfplotsset{compat=1.12} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \begin{tikzpicture}[trim left=(first.south west),trim ...


1

Just replace the extravagant \vspace{200cm} with \vfill:


0

If you don't specify text height and text depth, that is the default behaviour. To have them all the same height, set a minimum height. \documentclass[border=5mm]{standalone} \usepackage[latin1]{inputenc} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc, shapes, fit, positioning} \begin{document} \tikzset{ block/.style = {rectangle, draw, rounded corners, text ...


0

I used a \Centerstack on the text, and adjusted the text height and text depth. \documentclass[border=5mm]{standalone} \usepackage[latin1]{inputenc} \usepackage{tikz,stackengine} \setstackEOL{\\} \usetikzlibrary{calc, shapes, fit, positioning} \begin{document} \tikzset{ block/.style = {rectangle, draw, rounded corners, text width=6.0cm, text ...


8

To align lines on different pages (or columns) you need to typeset "on a grid". (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grid_%28graphic_design%29). That's rather difficult in LaTeX. There are a lot of irregular spaces and line heights which don't fit on a grid, e.g. sectioning commands, display math, lists. But in your case where only normal text is on the page ...


1

Your input misses a couple of &, but it also has some other glitches. Use environments for the logical structures such as theorems and proofs; if you use \noindent in the document body more than once, there's something wrong Never use $$ (see Why is \[ ... \] preferable to $$ ... $$?) The syntax {\Bbb Z} has been replaced by \mathbb{Z} a couple of ...


4

This is dependent on the length within \parskip. If it has some glue, it may stretch to better-fit the page. In your case, I see > 0.0pt plus 1.0pt > l.22 \showthe\parskip implying that your \parskip could be anything from 0pt to 1pt, which leads to what you see as a mis-alignment within the baselines. Is this normal? Sure. It allows for some ...


1

It seems that you looking for this: Anchors for split of equations should be present in each line of equation: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{setspace} \usepackage{bm} \begin{document} \noindent \textbf{Binomial Theorem:} If $n \in {\mathbb Z_{\geq 0}}$, then \[ (x+y)^n = \sum_{k=0}^{n} ...


0

One can just put the desired elements into a \Longstack, though I had to add an extra group, perhaps because of its inclusion in a varwidth environment. To summarize, I added this to the preamble \usepackage{stackengine} \setstackEOL{\cr} \renewcommand\stackalignment{l} to get left-aligned stacks, with \cr as the row separator. Then, in the tabular, I ...


1

I propose a solution that doesn't require \rowstyle for the first row. The makecell package allows for line breaks in cells, and a common formatting with the \thead, \makecell and a few other commands. Further, your caption and text at the bottom of the table will use a whole \linewidth, which is probably not what you want. It couldn't be detected ...


1

You can try this: $$ \Qcircuit @C=1em @R=.7em { & \gate{H} & \ctrl{1} & \gate{H} & \qw & \raisebox{-2.2em}{=} & & \targ & \qw \\ & \gate{H} & \targ & \gate{H} & \qw & & & \ctrl{-1} & \qw } $$


4

You do not need different boxes etc. You just need to remove baseline and use TikZ's baseline option to centre the trees vertically. For example, \documentclass[]{article} \usepackage{microtype} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{adjustbox} % forest \usepackage{forest} % parsing tree \forestset{ declare toks={wff}{}, declare toks={connective}{}, ...


1

I found a way to do the second option by inserting a strut and adjusting the minipage accordingly. The adjustbox package has everything available that is needed: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{wrapfig} \usepackage{calc} \usepackage{adjustbox} \newlength{\strutheight} \begin{document} ...


4

As defined, there is only one box and no other reference for alignment hence all trees are top-aligned. Choosing to put each tree on separate boxes and choosing the middle alignment, M the vertical center (equal height and depth), we obtain the desired result. Something like: \begin{adjustbox}{valign=M} <content> ...


3

You can use the makecellpackage, and its multirowcell command, which allow for multiline cells. I added cellspace, which define minimal vertical padding at the top and bottom of cells in column with specifier prefixed with the letter. And finally, using utf8 encoding for your code and a T1` encoded font, you can directly type accented letters. ...


0

\multicolumn{3}{c}% {{ \raggedleft \tablename\ \thetable{} -- continued from previous page}} \\ a c column is a horizontal box like \mbox so paragraph settings like \raggedleft have no effect, you presumably want \multicolumn{3}{r}% {\tablename\ \thetable{} -- continued from previous page} \\ to get a flush right entry.


0

Here you are. I added some vertical padding to cells, with the \makegaedcells command from makecell: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tabularx} \usepackage{makecell, multirow} \renewcommand\theadfont{\bfseries} \setcellgapes[t]{2pt} \begin{document} \makegapedcells \begin{tabularx}{\textwidth}{*{2}{l} X} \hline \multirowthead{7}{Abduction} ...


1

Here's an example with the rotated labels via graphicx, some formatting cleanup from booktabs, and ensuring the longtable never breaks up a category: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{longtable} \usepackage{multirow} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{booktabs} \begin{document} \begin{longtable}[c]{cccc} \toprule \textbf{Category} & \textbf{Name} ...


1

You have to load tocloft with the titles option (see section 2.1 in the manual). \documentclass[draft,a4paper,11pt,oneside]{book} \usepackage[DIV=9,BCOR=2mm,headinclude=true,footinclude=false]{typearea} \usepackage{titlesec} \usepackage[titles]{tocloft} \usepackage{lipsum} %---Chapter Title Format \titleformat{\chapter}[display] ...


2

An different approach to construct your images with text: use tabularx, accordingly redefine column types and you can obtain: \documentclass[14pt,oneside]{memoir} \usepackage{graphicx} % Insert image \graphicspath{ {images/} } \usepackage{wrapfig} \usepackage{float} \usepackage{lipsum} \pagestyle{plain} \usepackage{tabularx}% <-- new ...


2

In your B you have aligned the centre of the image with the first row of the text which looks odd, just remove the [t] so they are both centred


1

"10-point type, 12-point vertical spacing" may be achieved by passing the option 10pt to the \documentclass instruction. For the specific document class of interest, you'd write: \documentclass[10pt,journal]{IEEEtran} I must confess I don't fully understand the expression "14 double column, 12 pt pages".


2

OPTION 1: Row specific padding One can add a \stackgap to a given element of the line, which pads the element vertically by the amount of the optional argument (default 3pt). The MWE below shows 3 rows that have been padded with 1pt, 3pt, and 5pt, respectively. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine} \begin{document} \begin{table}[!h] ...


3

You're overspecificating: stating column widths is usually unnecessary; you also have p{2.5cm}X which means two column specifiers. If you want that the first column takes all the available space, use X; for getting centered entries, >{\centering}X. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{array} \usepackage{tabularx} \usepackage{booktabs} ...


10

The problem is not in diacritics, it is in LaTeX tables. You can give rows some vertical padding with the cellspace package, which ensure a minimal vertical distance between a cell and the above and below rules. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{array, cellspace} \setlength\cellspacetoplimit{3pt} ...


7

Insert a large \strut. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{table}[!h] \begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|c|c|} \hline {\Large\strut}\"Ostersund & \AA m\aa l & Oxel\"osund & Alings\aa s & \'Orlaith &O\'O\"O\H{O}\\ \hline \end{tabular} \end{table} \end{document}


10

I think the best way to proceed is to stop using \hline -- and, while you're at it, ditch all vertical bars -- and to use the line-drawing macros of the booktabs package. For the table at hand, \toprule and \bottomrule should be used. If, for some reason, you simply must use vertical bars (and hence can't use \toprule and \bottomrule), I suggest you load ...


0

See, if the following can help you: \documentclass{book} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{showframe} \begin{document} \newpage \section{Appendix} \label{append} \vfill \begin{table}[htb] \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{example-image} \caption['Tis table1]{'Tis table1} \label{table1} \end{table} \vfill \clearpage next page \end{document} I assume, ...


2

It is easier to show how to fix it than explain why it fails, which would require looking into exactly how \settototalheight works. It is generally safer to expand \usebox{\mybox} than just \mybox (which deletes the contents, at least locally). Since you have glue inside the minipage, you might as well use [s]. The difference is that the default ...


5

I propose this solution… but I would advise for something simpler (second solution): \documentclass[preview]{standalone} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{makebox} \begin{document} \begin{align*} ( A - B) ∪ (A - C) & = (A ∩ B^\mathrm{c}) ∪ (A ∩ C^\mathrm{c}) \\% & = A ∩ (B^\mathrm{c} ∪ C^\mathrm{c}) \\% ...



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