Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

It would help to know which, if any, LaTeX plugin you're using for vim. (E.g., the latex-suite, vim-auctex, latex-box, etc.) Next, as far as viewer choice, the only widely used open source PDF viewer for Linux which currently supports SyncTeX well out of the box is Okular. That's probably your best choice. There are instructions fo setting up SyncTeX with ...


22

The Vim-LaTex / LaTeX-Suite for Vim adds these markers automatically and by intension. You can jump to the next such marker using CTRL+J, which removes this marker. The idea is to speed things up by allowing you to jump to the end of the group or environment which was just added. This is also useful for templates where you can add <+name+> markers ...


21

I have the following function in my $VIM/ftplugin/context.vim file to format ConTeXt paragraphs (same as LaTeX: the environments are enclosed in \start... and \stop... instead of \begin{...} and \end{...}. It should be easy to adapt this to LaTeX (In fact, I think that I copied it originally from someone who had written it for LaTeX and adapted it to ...


20

Disclaimer: I usually edit .tex files in Vim, but I don't use the Vim-LaTeX suite. I wouldn't say the following suggestions are tricks per se - they are provided by third-party plugins - but they actually help me with my usual TeX workflow: snipMate Created by Michael Sanders From the manual: snipMate.vim aims to be an unobtrusive, concise vim script ...


20

I would highly recommend the vim latex-suite, which you can get either from http://vim-latex.sourceforge.net/index.php?subject=manual&title=Manu or (on an Ubuntu machine) using sudo apt-get install vim-latexsuite sudo vim-addons -w install latex-suite It provides many shortcuts. If I were going to type your first summation ...


19

I suppose you already have Vim installed in your operating system. Usually, the installation is very straightforward for every operating system. For Macs, we have MacVim, and AFAIK two options are available: Getting the correct MacVim version for your operating system in the project website, unzip the archive file and drag MacVim.app to your Applications ...


15

If you write "... this was written by \ref{foo}" the following output is possible: ... this was written by [1] which looks ugly in fact of the linebreak. This is the reason why vim is very nice to you and told you that you should write: "... this was written by~\ref{foo}". Then your output is at least: ... this was written by [1] So it is not a ...


12

The following hopefully answers your "abbreviated questions": vim suggests inserting \@ before . in ...GRIP/ABP. So, do it! The reason here is that GRIP/ABP or any capitalized word before a period is usually an abbreviation. And, in some instances, abbreviations have periods, while some don't. To treat the end-of-abbreviation period as an end-of-sentence ...


11

Quick and dirty solution :syn match texStatement "\\[a-zA-Z_:]\+" or add @ :syn match texStatement "\\[a-zA-Z_:@]\+" It isn't enough, but looks much better. But better Modify $VIM/syntax/tex.vim, search b:tex_stylish, and modify all expressions about it.


11

With the vim-latexsuite spell-checking works fine. Since it makes typing latex files a lot easier and faster I can only recommend it to every LaTeX-writing vim user.


10

I don't know about Vim and its TeX/LaTeX syntax parser. It probably uses some rule that interprets a number followed by one of the keywords in pt cm mm em ex (and maybe also the other units of measure accepted by TeX) as denoting lengths; this is usually good, but it fails in situations such as There are 42 books on the shelf and still 32 in the box My ...


9

If you run gnuplot <basename>-gnuplottex-fig1.gnuplot, you'll see gnuplot's error message plot for [i=1:14] 'benchmarks/test.csv' u (\$0+1):i title ''.i.'00 kb' with linespoints ^ "texse-gnuplottex-fig1.gnuplot", line 16: invalid character \ gnuplot is stumbling over the \$. You don't need to escape the ...


9

This is a solution for evince, thanks to José Aliste who wrote gedit-synctex-plugin: Preamble Download these files deflate them to ~/bin (or something within $PATH) Backward Search (Evince → Editor) Adopt the first line of »~/bin/evince« (EDITORCMD) to your needs. (run »evince_backward_search« to get help for possible entries) Compile your .tex File ...


9

You could create a command, which gobbles its argument, such as in the comment here: Control command arguments: \newcommand{\comment}[1]{} If you just wish to gobble a character, name it so and use it like \newcommand*{\commentchar}[1]{} Text \commentchar() which results in Text ). Another way, shown by Joseph on LaTeX-Community.org is defining an ...


9

It has been saved as utf-16 and so every other byte is 0 (often displayed as ^@ as @ has code 64 so zero is control-@) The only thing I know about vim is that it isn't emacs but in chat my backup vim expert suggests :set fileencoding=utf-8 :set encoding=utf-8


8

Your question is a little confusing. What you mean is compiling a LaTeX document manually (into a PDF). You might want to adjust your title. Creating one would be the process of writing the document. This can be done in the command line using pdflatex <filename>. In VIM you could just use ESC:!pdflatex % (% can be used instead of the current filename) ...


8

Add let g:Tex_SmartKeyQuote=0 to $VIM/ftplugin/tex.vim (create that file if necessary), where $VIM corresponds to ~/.vim for unixy operating systems and ~/vimfiles for Windows. There are more configuration variables, see the latexsuite manual.


8

SumatraPDF can be called with commandline options, see help manual. The option -reuse-instance will do the trick The final modification that made it works is this: let g:Tex_ViewRule_pdf = 'SumatraPDF -reuse-instance'


8

\Copy probably isn't used as a document level command but then that is because it's not a good name for a document level command (according to the somewhat under-enforced LaTeX command naming guidelines). See Macro naming best practice? Other possibilities would be: emacs naming (clearly good:-) \kill and \yank (but some people may find that a bit ...


7

I use the vim-latex suite, and absolutely love it. However, I've found the following tweaks quite useful to help me compile my documents. (These commands will be most useful to Linux users) I like to 'toggle' between seeing the compiler output and not. With the setup below, I simply press t which toggles between 'silent' and 'verbose' mode I like to be ...


7

I stumbled upon this one today, as also already posted above. http://michaelgoerz.net/refcards


7

The following works on my end: Create a file called latexmk.vimrc in the current directory with the following content set nocompatible filetype plugin on set grepprg=grep\ -nH\ $* filetype indent on let g:tex_flavor='latex' let g:Tex_DefaultTargetFormat = 'pdf' let g:Tex_CompileRule_pdf = 'latexmk -pdf -f $*' set iskeyword+=: Call vim -u latexmk.vimrc ...


7

Kile has vim mode, as it uses kate as the editing component. It can be set under Settings/Editing/Editor/Vi input mode. It does not support all vim features, but I found it good enough for what I needed (i.e. usual way to type/search/copy/move/...)


7

Here's how I installed the vim latex-suite on Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install vim-latexsuite sudo vim-addons -w install latex-suite


7

Something that is pretty much as useful is to type nameofenvironment then F5 which gives \begin{nameofenvironment} \end{nameofenvironment}<++> and puts the cursor in the body of the environment. You can leave the environment easily by pressing CTRL J


7

A quite long comment... I don't think your question is specific to Vim or any other editor. Whether you are given a code completion, auto-environment closing tool or not it is quite important to reduce the mental load while writing your code. A short-term loss can be a long-term benefit if you can spend extra seconds to write-up with a better indentation. I ...


7

There are no real standards, but here are some tips I’ve found handy: Don’t indent parts of a paragraph, but do break lines between sentences and after significant phrases within a sentence. As I posted at http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/64538/2966, this makes it easier for small edits to have small diffs. (You are using a VCS, aren’t you?) To exaggerate my ...


7

The following solution only applies to paragraph formatting, it will properly work depending on the LaTeX styling settings. Another possible solution would be to set a hard wrap of 80 characters. http://vimcasts.org/episodes/hard-wrapping-text/ formatoptions: t - Auto-wrap text using textwidth c - Auto-wrap comments using textwidth, ...


6

If you are using Adobe Reader or certain other PDF readers it locks the file. I don't know what OS you are on, but based on discussion in the chatroom Reader only locks the file on Windows. If you are indeed on Windows switch to Sumatra PDF, which does not lock the file. I don't know what linux or Mac PDF readers lock the file, but you should try switching ...


6

I would not change them. They are much more readable than the “traditional” TeX syntax. If you use unicode input they should work in your document. If you really want to: %s/“/``"/g This line changes “ to ``" in the entire document. Use a similar mapping for ”: %s/”/<whatever>/g



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible