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0

I guess it might be caused by missing a step of post-installation of TeX Live. From the instruction provided tug.org, it would be like this below. Make sure you have imported TeX Live binaries to your PATH. If not, you may refer this section. Check the value of TEXMFSYSVAR. $ kpsewhich --var-value TEXMFSYSVAR Copy ...


0

The default monospace font on OS X is now actually Menlo, which does include the character. So the solution was to use it: \newfontfamily{\menlofont}{Menlo} To define the font and: \begin{Verbatim}[fontfamily=Menlo(0)] Happy λ \end{Verbatim}


0

Seems like wrapping \chemfig with the appropriate \mathversions works: \makeatletter \let\@@chemfig\chemfig \def\chemfig#1{\mathversion{ssp}\@@chemfig{#1}\mathversion{cm}} \makeatother


0

This issue is due to a too small postscript/ghostscript DEFAULTPAPERSIZE, which as well is applied in portrait mode, rather an rotated to landscape. This is also documented in “XeTeX pstricks larger page size is cropped to A4” A workaround is to build the document e.g. with (resp. a large enough paper size) GS_OPTIONS=-sDEFAULTPAPERSIZE=a0 xelatex ...


3

Maybe you can use features provided by your editor. In case of emacs, you can use time-stamp. First, you have to adjust the variables time-stamp-format and time-stamp-pattern. I suggest using file local versions by putting something like this at the end of your document: %%% Local Variables: %%% mode: latex %%% eval: (set (make-local-variable ...


2

The problem is that you are doing an \includegraphics{} on a EPS file that is invalid. When this happened to me, the EPS file hadn't changed in a year, so I have to assume it was the newer version of XeLaTeX that I was using (either a new bug, or the new version is less tolerant of sloppy EPS files. How to find the EPS that causes this problem: Sadly the ...


-1

There seems to be a package Datetime. This seems to print the time zone too. Using the command \DTMnow Refer to http://ctan.org/pkg/datetime2


7

This can be done by running an external program, for example, date on Unix systems. The output can be redirected to a file and then read by TeX. On Unix systems, also piping is possible. Example: \documentclass{article} \immediate\write18{date >\jobname.date} \begin{document} Current time is: \input{\jobname.date} \end{document} The shell ...


4

Don't abuse the mono font, use polyglossia and its interface: \documentclass[a4paper]{hitec} \author{\textit{Ms Author}} \date{September 9, 1999} \title{A fancy title} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{lipsum} \setmainlanguage{english} \setotherlanguage[variant=polytonic]{greek} \newfontfamily\greekfont{Cardo} \begin{document} ...


0

Another possible reason why you might have trouble getting straight quotes when using fontspec: the config file. I'm not sure where it lives on other platforms; on linux locate fontspec.cfg will show you where it is. I just discovered that my wife's laptop (TeX Live 2014) had a very different fontspec.cfg than my laptop (TeX Live 2013). Specifically, hers ...


0

I figure out a way myself, and found it working pretty good. So I answer my own question here. It is a method of using external .bat in Three steps. First, create a bat file named conversion.bat in the latex directory with the contents as below SETLOCAL ENABLEDELAYEDEXPANSION for %%G in (*.eps) do @if not exist "%%~nG.pdf" (epstopdf "%%G") else ( (for /f ...


2

Unfortunately, this is not currently possible. Some glyphs could but used for multiple unicode slots. Note: It seems perfectly reasonable to create a function that acquires multiple code points, should the same glyph be used in multiple code points. Maybe someone will make this possible someday.


0

If your document becomes more and more complex, you should think about automating things. A great tool for this is Make: http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/packages/make.htm You have to write a Makefile, which is a simple text file (but without ending). A Makefile is a set of rules which describe how a target is made and which dependencies it has. All rules ...


5

Since XeTeX does not have timekeeping capabilities, the shell escape feature is left. The disadvantage is the large overhead of running external programs with duration variations. The following example runs with plain and LaTeX formats. It is written for Perl under Linux and requires the -shell-escape switch: xetex -shell-escape test xelatex -shell-escape ...


0

As @Will_Robertson pointed out, I had an old version of fontspec installed. I actually had multiple versions of fontspec installed in different folders in miktex. Miktex was finding the older version and using it. Once I deleted the old version, it started working.


3

Why don't you simply call once epstopdf file.eps to convert your eps before running xelatex? Beside this: Converting the file on the fly when it doesn't exist is not so difficult. E.g. compile this with xelatex --shell-escape: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \IfFileExists{testeps1.pdf}{}{\immediate\write18{epstopdf ...


2

Your path needs to be surrounded by braces {}. I also separate the ending comma-delimiters with a space. Here is how I would do it. I used: Folder called Fonts inside of base directory (where your font files are located) MinionPro*.otf (grabs all variants, assuming your file name scheme is fontname-type.otf where -type represents: -Bold, -Italic, ...


0

Please, next time use the eledmac tag. The begin{arabic} should be arround the pstart and not inside. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{geometry} \geometry{letterpaper} \usepackage{setspace,ragged2e} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage{english} \setotherlanguage{arabic} \setmainfont{Scheherazade} ...


5

I won't consider this as a bug. It’s kind of common sense for – at least some – designer/typographers to kern the period and a quotations mark in that way. The amount of necessary kerning depends on the typeface and is subjective to the designer’s eye, though. On my system all optical sizes apply the same kerning: In XeTeX you can define custom kerning ...


4

I don't know what negative side effects this ugly workaround will cause, but it seems to work (tested with lualatex): \enquote{Hallo Welt\mbox{.}} Are there better alternatives? Yes, next to Tobi's answer that addresses xeLaTeX the following solution is compatible with luaLaTeX. It implements a font feature file that introduces two additional features ...


5

My own conclusion, after running a series of more tests, and after studying a bit more the official spec for JFIF (JPEG File Interchange Format) file format (PDF) is this: ImageMagick is not at fault. All of pdflatex, lualatex and xelatex are wrong and exhibit a bug when they do not properly embed the JPEG into the PDF page. JFIF spec The JFIF ...


2

When you use babel or polyglossia for language support, you need to add the \renewcommand for the bibliography name to the elements defined by babel or polyglossia. \addto\captionsgerman{\renewcommand{\refname}{Literaturverzeichnis}} It's not quite clear from your question what the problem is with the page headings. In your original code, you don't set ...


2

(More than a year has passed since the query was posted initially. However, the following answer may still be useful to some people.) The key to getting this program to run under XeLaTeX appears to be to set the Path option correctly when issuing the instruction \setmainfont. The following, modified version of your code assumes that you use TeXLive2015 (or ...


10

The image wiz-standard.jpg does not have any resolution DPI settings set (the other image is set to 300 and 300). Several image software packages do not set this properly as it is rarely used (including by TeX as far as I know), but for some odd reason TeX requires it to be set (to anything you like - because it is not used - whether you choose 100x100 or ...


16

As it happens I stumbled upon the same problem last week and the next version of LuaTeX will detect these images and issue a warning: LuaTeX warning (file wiz-standard.jpg): The image specifies an unusual resolution of 1dpi by 1dpi. pdfTeX/luaTeX read jpegs bytewise (no exif involved) and images of these kind really specify a resolution of 1dpi by 1dpi ...


1

Try giving (say) \setromanfont{Bitstream Charter} \setmathfont[range=\mathup/{num}]{Courier New} \setmathfont[range=\mathit/{latin,Latin,greek,Greek}]{Bitstream Charter} This will produce numbers in Bitstream Charter font in normal text and Courier New font numbers in Math mode.


1

This seems to be a bug in grffile, I'm afraid. The minimal example is \documentclass{article} \usepackage{grffile} \DeclareGraphicsRule{*}{eps}{*}{} \begin{document} \includegraphics{testdiagram.1} \end{document} that stops with the same identical error ! LaTeX Error: File `testdiagram.1.' not found. where testdiagram.1 is a file built by Metapost. ...


2

Define the square root symbol √ to behave differently in minted: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{unicode-math} \usepackage{minted} % uses minted 2.0+ \usepackage{etoolbox} \usepackage{newunicodechar} \newtoggle{inminted} \newunicodechar{√}{\iftoggle{inminted}{√}{\sqrt}} ...


0

Thanks for this! It helped me a lot, but it still required some experiments to get it working. Hence, I would like to contribute a functional example here: File letter-preamble-th.tex %%% IMPORTANT --- must be compiled with XeLaTeX!!! %%% \documentclass[a4paper, footsepline, pagenumber=botcenter, fromalign=left, fromrule=below, fromemail=true, ...


0

This is fixed by passing the path as an option to \newfontfamily: \newfontfamily{\FA}[Path = C:/Windows/Fonts/]{FontAwesome-1000upm}


5

This should do the trick for PDF/X-1a (you need ISOcoated_v2_300_eci.icc in the current directory): % =============================== % Filename: test.tex \documentclass{article} % =============================== % Embedding the color profile. % Requires ISOcoated_v2_300_eci.icc in the working directory % ...


0

You can use the \LTRfootnote command to set the footnote align from left to right. However, in terms of numbers, such a command does not change the numbers to Latin form.


3

Your log indicates you have BasicTeX installed. It only contains a minimal number of packages from the full TeX Live. As such, assuming you want a small system (rather than just downloading and installing the full MacTeX) you can use the TeX Live Manager to add titlesec and framed. You could also use the Terminal to do this: that's what I would do sudo ...


10

You seem to have a misunderstanding of font lookup of xetex. The different lookup mechanisms are described in detail in the XeTeX manual, but I will try to boil things down a little for an answer. If you provide a font name, e.g. Times New Roman, as in your first example, where you call \setmainfont{Times New Roman} then XeTeX will use your system's ...


2

You can give a try at the Gillius No2 free opentype font, inspired by Gill Sans. It also can be used with (pdf)latex, and is available with TeX Live as well as MiKTeX. There is also a condensed version. Edit: Under MiKTeX, to make the package work with (pdf)latex, after installing the package, you should run updmap as administrator. Added: As mentioned ...


3

amsmath redefines \[...\] to its own equation* environment which doesn't use \makebox to workaround vmode spacing issues. So loading amsmath solves this problem.


2

Use family: \documentclass{beamer} \usefonttheme{professionalfonts} \usepackage{fontspec} \setsansfont{Old Standard} % just to make it distinguishable from Helvetica \newfontfamily\helveticalike{TeX Gyre Heros} \setbeamerfont{title}{size*={32pt}{38.4pt},series=\bfseries,family=\helveticalike} \begin{document} \title{A title in Helvetica} \author{Who} ...


1

If you add (or remove) hyperref it is often necessary to remove all aux and toc files so they may be rebuilt in an appropriate way.


2

I found a solution that works for me. I started playing around with version=bold, as David suggested, but that kept turning all my math mode text bold. In the end I switched from file names to system font names. (I wanted to avoid that initially, since I am working on the same document from several different machines.) With system font names, \boldmath ...



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