New answers tagged

0

Well, with your image file squarebdd.eps or with the file example-image.eps (do not leave the extention out!) I can compile your code with or without bb without error and showing up image in XeLaTeX or PdfLaTeX. The only difference to your system I can see that my logfile tells me, that I'm using LaTeX2e <2015/10/01> patch level 2 but you have ...


2

Just call the font by its name: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmonofont{Latin Modern Mono Prop} \newfontfamily{\monott}{Latin Modern Mono} % for testing \begin{document} abcim \texttt{abcim} abcim abcim {\monott abcim} abcim \end{document} As you see, the \texttt line prints proportional typewriter type.


0

I could not get things to compile, so I converted to Latin text and compiled with pdflatex. But, since your background lines did not require autowrapping, I suggest the use of the stackengine package: \documentclass[12pt,sanskrit]{memoir} \usepackage[b6paper]{geometry} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage[pages=some]{background} %\usepackage{xunicode} ...


0

The \def\pgfsysdriver{pgfsys-dvipdfm.def} trick kinda worked for me, but it totally messed up the position of my images in my presentation. So I decided to dig a little further and here is what I've found : This is indeed a bug, and depending on the beamer theme you are using, the package pgfpages will override the behavior of the theme which is using : ...


0

I have to use Cntl+Super+B (perhaps Cntl+Windows+B on PC/Linux?). This brings up a list of possible build systems. I select the Single Quick Build xelatex one, and it works. After building once, from then on I can just do "Super-B" (probably Cntl-B on Windows/Linux).


0

Since polyglossia allows unicode characters, the name Apéndice as content of \appendixname causes a problem for the hyperanchor that is to be set for the correct linking. The appendix package defines \Hy@chapname to be \appendixname, which is Apéndice in this case → 'wrong'. Redefining \Hy@chapname cures the problem -- just use a anchorname with 'regular' ...


2

You want to have neither \\ nor \noto in the bookmarks. The simplest solution is to use a command for the section titles: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{tocloft} \usepackage{hyperref} \newfontfamily\noto{Malayalam MN} % I don't have Noto \newcommand{\nototitle}[1]{% ...


4

The .pdf file can't interpret the \noto command and the font specification correctly for the bookmarks. Use \texorpdfstring{\fontspec{...}}{} I've removed the 'wrong' \\ usages as well. The Noto fonts can be downloaded from https://www.google.com/get/noto/ \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} ...


2

When BibTeX is run, there are two warnings Warning--you've exceeded 250, the entry-string-size, for entry 2014A&A...568A..22B while executing--line 1183 of file mn2e.bst *Please notify the bibstyle designer* Warning--you've exceeded 250, the entry-string-size, for entry 2014A&A...568A..22B while executing--line 1222 of file mn2e.bst *Please notify ...


3

The idea of \localtableofcontents, as I understand it, is that the local contents listing is for use within, say, a chapter or a section, and not before it. If you put \localtableofcontents after the \chapter command, then it works fine. If you put it before, then it is in the previous sectional division and belongs to that section. For example, ...


3

If you're using xelatex, you should load fontspec that allows you to set the main font with \setmainfont{} and you can choose any font you have in your own OS. This should be the font of the main part of your document. If you're writing primarily using the Latin alphabet, then you should choose an appropriate font. As far as the languages are concerned, I'd ...


1

There are several parts to your question. How to use XeLaTeX ? In order to compile a unicode document using XeLaTeX, you first need to write a unicode document. So you will have to make it an UTF-8 document. Once this is done, it is very easy. You write your document as if you were using PDFLatex, but instead, you will compile it using xelatex.exe. As ...


2

If you're interested in XeLaTex and read French, you may find this book useful: Maïeul Rouquette, (Xe)LaTeX appliqué aux sciences humaines, 2012. The code is open source.


3

LaTeX date strings have to be in the form 2016/04/20 not 2016-04-20


2

Just override the declarations with the original one: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathcal}{OMS}{cmsy}{m}{n} \begin{document} $\mathcal{DFIP}_{\mathcal{DFIP}_{\mathcal{DFIP}}}$ \end{document} This is the output of pdffonts, showing that cmsy is used. name type ...


0

You can just write the name of your ttf (instead of font family name) \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[ %Path = C:/Users/font/, %address of your fonts Extension = .ttf, BoldFont = *-Bold, ItalicFont = *-Oblique, BoldItalicFont = *-BoldOblique, ]{DejaVuSans} %\newfontfamily{\myfont}[ %ame as in main font %]{myfont} If it still ...


2

Very late answer, but you could also locally set the mathcodes of the letters to the ones plain TeX defines. Then you load the Computer Modern Calligraphic fonts and redefine \mathcal to locally switch to this family and use the “legacy” mathcodes. This solution is superior to the other answer, because you obtain proper scaling of the calligraphic letters ...


5

Be warned, this isn't an experts answer. It is an answer from an users perspective. The whole ecosystem of LaTeX has improved a lot: texlive comes with a package manager that really works (but I don't know exactly since which year). It is able to get specific packages from different repositories. Inverse search and forward search work under Linux and ...


3

Since xpatch is loaded by imakeidx at begin document, every sort of evil will happen if nag is loaded. I don't think I'll add patches for supporting nag (a package I don't recommend). Note that similar issues can arise whenever a package is loaded at begin document, when nag is loaded. You can work around the issue by explicitly loading xpatch before ...


1

As @Johannes_B suggested, I ran Biber using the appropriate command. The steps I used are: F6 for generating necessary files F8 (instead of F11) for making bibliography F6 twice for generating the pdf with the bibliography. Thanks to you all for the support!


1

The value of \arraystrech is set elsewhere but commenting that out didn't help. It seems that the default value was also not appropriate. So I put the \align inside a group and then checked a couple of \arraystrech values until I found the right one. Thank you everyone! \begingroup \renewcommand*{\arraystretch}{2} \begin{align} &\begin{bmatrix} 0 & ...


0

(Not a real answer, just a MWE placeholder.) As Mico indicated, your result can't be reproduced with what you provided. Below is a MWE with the minimum amount of uncommented code. None of the packages you mentioned make any difference in the output, so they've been commented out. Whatever is causing the bad alignment is elsewhere in your actual document. ...


5

Tools like Pandoc. Pandoc is able to convert Markdown to LaTeX. I like LaTeX's output, but I'm not really fond of writing LaTeX files. I guess more than 95% of the time Pandoc's Markdown is enough for me (esp. because it supports LaTeX math). In the end, the plain text input is much more readable than my former plain text LaTeX files.


5

Why are you using an inline list when you obviously don't want it to be inline? Removing all your settings seems to give the output you want: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{times} \usepackage[inline, shortlabels]{enumitem} \begin{document} \begin{enumerate} \item \begin{enumerate} \item What is the flow rate in terms of the ...


5

As was told you in the comments, you can (and should if you're using xelatex) use a font that supports all IPA glyphs. Since you're using a table, you can automatize this so that only the cells with IPA use that font, and the headers use the regular font. For the headers I'm using a particular font here just to show the difference, but you can use anything ...


9

As explained by this answer, you can either use tipa and compile using pdfLaTeX or load a Unicode IPA font using fontspec and compile using XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX. I strongly recommend using a Unicode IPA font rather than tipa for the reasons outlined in this answer. Here is an example that uses the IPA versions of most of the symbols shown in the image you ...


1

After lot's of searching I managed to get full support with a twitter based emoji set from here: https://github.com/alecjacobson/coloremoji.sty


7

I can get most of them e.g. with DejaVu Sans (but some are missing): %compiled with lualatex \documentclass{report} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{DejaVu Sans} \begin{document} How would I go about adding the large range of emotions (😀 😁 😂 😃 😄 😅 😆 😇 😈 😉 😊 😋 😌 😍 😎 😏 😐 😑 😒 😓 😔 😕 😖 😗 😘 😙 😚 😛 😜 😝 😞 😟 😠 😡 😢 😣 😤 😥 😦 😧 ...


0

Here is a working way to execute latex from PHP. The point is that functions as exec, shell_exec, passthru, etc. get no or a vary limited PATH variable. However, latex, pdflatex and others use the path variable to call other programs. We therefore need to set the path appropriately, for example as follows: passthru('PATH=/usr/bin:$PATH pdflatex file.tex'); ...


0

The issue was fixed in the current DEV versions of biblatex 3.4 and biber 2.5. See https://github.com/plk/biblatex/issues/368 .


3

Not really a change to LaTeX itself but I see two major changes the new Online LaTeX editors like Overleaf is an important change in the way that we can create LaTeX documents. Services like Overleaf and Share LaTeX enable newcomers to get started without downloading and installing the software More and better instructional videos on services like YouTube ...


1

A \addfontfeature command will overwrite the standard font colours and other features within the specified stretch, e.g. {\addfontfeature{BoldItalicFeatures={Colour=red}}\bfseries\itshape these words are red} But this might not be too practical. A \newcommand might work: \newcommand{\mycolouredtext}[2]{{\addfontfeature{% ItalicFeatures={Colour=#1},% ...


1

I'm not sure I'd use English quotes here, but it works if you load ucharclasses before xeCJK. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[no-math]{fontspec} \setmainfont{Noto Serif} \usepackage[Latin,Arabic]{ucharclasses} \usepackage{xeCJK} \setCJKmainfont{Noto Sans CJK JP} \begin{document} ``\texttt{めいじ}'' \end{document}


6

You can access the internal and the external names of the current font respectively with \the\font and \fontname\font. The former must be stringified in order to print it. Further massaging of the external font name can be added. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Libertinus Serif} \setsansfont{TeX Gyre ...


1

ExternalLocation does work indeed. \setmainfont[ExternalLocation={/some/directory/}]{some_file.ttf}


12

For me the biggest change is Lua(TeX): the ability to separate TeX's building blocks (processing the input / building the node lists / output). That way you can for example build a product that uses TeX's linebreaking and hyphenation algorithm and its superb output, but without its troublesome input language. With the minimal TeX file \catcode`\{=1 ...


0

Define an own fontface. If you are using one of the KOMA-Script classes you can define the headers in an easy way to use Times. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{unicode-math} %\setmainfont{what ever you want} \newfontface\Times{Times New Roman MT Std}% I have only this otf version \begin{document} Latin Modern {\Times $a=0 \text{ if ...


2

You could load the alphalph package. Then, \alphalph{\value{section}} generates a lowercase-latin "numeral" to represent the value of the counter named section. A full MWE: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setdefaultlanguage{hebrew} \newfontfamily\hebrewfont[Scale=MatchLowercase]{Ezra SIL} \usepackage{alphalph} \begin{document} ...


0

I opened the font with FontForge and generated a new TTF. Now everything works as it should. So something is wrong with some of the font names or with the file structure that LuaLaTeX can handle but XeLaTeX can't. I tried other fonts from the source (ufonts.com) and DIN 6776 was the only font with this problem.


2

Please consider this a ›temporary‹ answer (maybe Will Robertson can provide more info). I'm still in the process of investigating that problem myself (I'm testing SkyFonts + Monotype Library Subscription + LuaLaTeX). But all the data I have so far points in the same direction: fontspec is not able to load a font installed via SkyFonts unless the font ...


0

LaTeXTools doesn't support -aux-directory or -output-directory (yet). However, if you can stomach having a couple of symbolic links in the same directory as your main tex document, you can use something like roeeebar's suggestion from this issue, which adds a settings block to your sublime-project file (I've modified this for Windows, but I haven't tested ...


1

Why the underscores ? Try this: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Times New Roman} \begin{document} \section{This stuff becomes times} This will be Times New Roman. As wanted. \textbf{\textit{And this too is ok}}. \end{document} % Local Variables: % TeX-engine: xetex % End:


2

What you're describing is a \clip path. If you start your tikzpicture with e.g. \clip (0,0) rectangle (3,3); everything that comes later will be clipped away if it is outside that rectangle. You can make any sort of path I think, so my example from the comment above would also work, i.e. \clip (0,0) -- (2,0) -- (1,2) -- cycle; That said, the final PDF ...


1

Thanks Steven for the hint and reference Emulating article class margins with the geometry package pass is the key which keeps the original settings and also allows to create a new command with custom options. I added pass parameter to the geometry package and after the \newpage and I did setup the custom margin via \newgeomtery command ...


1

First of all that shouldn't be the case. By default mcode uses the font Courier. See line 178-179 in mcode.sty: % default font \def\lstbasicfont{\fontfamily{pcr}\selectfont\footnotesize} So what you want do to is redefine \lstbasicfont. As far as I remember MATLAB uses Helvetica as default font. So just add \newfontfamily{\helvetica}{Helvetica} ...


4

Only a first version, working for digits only, not for numbers > 9. In short: enumitem needs special counter output information for such setups, i.e. an \AddEnumerateCounter macro must be used. The special setup is valid here only for digits, unfortunately. \documentclass{article} % For bilingual document \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} ...


6

The following Python script for FontForge creates #!/usr/bin/env python2 import fontforge import os.path font_files = [ 'Vollkorn-Bold.otf', 'Vollkorn-BoldItalic.otf', 'Vollkorn-Italic.otf', 'Vollkorn-Regular.otf', ] def main(): for font_file_name in font_files: make_new_font(font_file_name) def ...


1

You can try libertinusmath-regular which is similiar to Pagella \documentclass[compsoc]{IEEEtran} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmathfont[Extension=.otf]{libertinusmath-regular} \begin{document} \(\left\lBrack\check f\right\rBrack\) \(\left\llbracket\check f\right\rrbracket\) \end{document}


1

Granted that the positioning of the accent is suboptimal, you can add \, in a couple of places: \documentclass[compsoc]{IEEEtran} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmathfont[Extension=.otf]{texgyrepagella-math} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \begin{document} \(\lBrack\,\check{f}\,\rBrack\) \(\lBrack\,\check{f}\rBrack\) \(\bigl\lBrack\,\check{f}\,\bigr\rBrack\) ...


1

After some helpful pointers I examined latex code and looked at several different options to work with tables in R-Markdown. I tried using pander package, but the results were not as straightforward as with xtable, and I like xtable producing straight latex output - there is no intermediate markdown step, which I think there is with pander. But pander would ...



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