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Dec
8
revised How to avoid widow lines after displayed equations
tried to make even clearer what I want to achieve
Dec
8
revised How to avoid widow lines after displayed equations
tried to make clearer what I want to achieve
Dec
6
comment How to avoid widow lines after displayed equations
Thanks for your answer! I'm not sure at all, but I've got the impression that your code works due to some kind of LaTeX bug: If "one line of text" starts a new paragraph, then it goes to the next page as I want - so far so good. But somehow this only happens because then the first page ends with an empty line which leaves no space for "one line of text". I have no idea at all where this empty line comes from!
Nov
23
comment {(x+y)}^2 or (x+y)^2?
@einpoklum: That's what I was saying all the time: math-wise they do. (And typesetting-wise, the output is fine without braces; see Jobobs' answer. Knuth designed the TeX-engine in such a way that you don't have to type braces in order to get nice output.)
Nov
22
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
22
comment {(x+y)}^2 or (x+y)^2?
@einpoklum: What I meant: For me, the parentheses () do already bunch the formula together, so there's no need for braces.
Nov
22
comment {(x+y)}^2 or (x+y)^2?
@einpoklum: Well, I'm a mathematician, so I don't see inappropriate semantics here - why should I surround parentheses with braces? I agree that this feature of the typesetting engine is cumbersome, but it's less a design choice than a limitation of computers from the late seventies, when the choice was made. It would of course be great if LuaTeX or some other engine would offer better typesetting in such a case.
Nov
8
comment Typesetting of negative versus minus?
@Niel: Wow, how did they manage to clearly distinguish between the two?
Nov
5
awarded  Announcer
Oct
23
awarded  Enlightened
Oct
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
19
awarded  Yearling
Sep
13
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
4
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
26
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
2
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
30
comment Can I get a \widebar without using the mathabx package?
@Darling: You could ask a new question, referring to this answer.
Jun
30
comment Negative phantom
@Fictional: Yes, that's correct. And I wrapped the whole thing into a \mathop so that before and after it you also get the same spacing as for \cos.