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Jun
4
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
20
comment Physics EMF symbol in LaTeX
@hftf well, now you have, or at least you know someone who has. ;-) I guess there must be some variation between sources, but pretty much every time I remember seeing it, the symbol seems like an exact match to the calligraphic E.
Apr
20
comment Physics EMF symbol in LaTeX
@hftf I'm not sure this really should be a duplicate, because the symbol used for EMF is \mathcal{E} (I've written it many times, I know), but the other question's poster specifically says that is not the symbol they're looking for.
Apr
15
awarded  Good Question
Apr
8
asked Scaling a plot axis to keep the same size unit vectors over multiple plots
Mar
28
awarded  Necromancer
Feb
5
comment All letters upright in math mode (equivalent to \rm)
@a_guest semantically speaking, the right thing to do is to put only the subscripts in upright font, because the subscripts are text. But the main letters (A, B, C) are variables and would remain in math (italic) font.
Jan
22
awarded  Convention
Jan
20
awarded  Custodian
Jan
20
reviewed Approve What are good sites to find citations in BibTex format?
Jan
3
answered command for printing only what has been specified as A or B
Dec
11
comment Vectors and indices
You could also consider r_i^2, since the square of a vector is the square of its magnitude (assuming you define magnitude using the L2 norm, as is typical). This is the most common way to write squared vectors in many fields of physics. If you want to preserve the vector notation, consider setting vectors in bold instead of using arrows.
Dec
1
comment Code for pin icon on a map
@Harry it's possible you might have nothing to lose by using XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX for this particular document. See this question‌​.
Nov
28
answered When to use $something$ syntax?
Oct
29
comment Show only main part of Tikz diagram and outliers via extension
For what it's worth, cutting out part of the axis is considered to be bad presentation in many cases. It distorts the relative magnitudes of the different points on your graph, so e.g. it could make the difference between 75 and 80 look much more significant than it really is. But whether this is the case with your graph depends on the interpretation of your data.
Oct
28
comment How do I gracefully retire a package?
@EnthusiasticStudent of course, there is no guarantee people don't use my package. If there were I would just have it removed from CTAN and not even ask this question. ;-) But when two packages serve the same purpose (I don't mean "drawing" like Asymptote and TikZ, I mean commands in one are practically aliases for commands in another), it is better for the community to standardize on one option or the other. On point (2) if there were new functionality to add, I would make a new package.
Oct
27
awarded  Good Question
Oct
26
comment How do I gracefully retire a package?
@EnthusiasticStudent consider it a premise of the question that there is no reason for anyone to use my package. But in this case, all the functionality provided by my package also exists in other packages, so people can just use those other packages.
Oct
26
comment How do I gracefully retire a package?
@cfr yes, of course, no switching of the TeX engine is involved. And the information in that comment is exactly the sort of thing I'm looking for in the answers.
Oct
26
comment How do I gracefully retire a package?
@cfr what I want is to advise anyone considering using my package that they should no longer use it, in the strongest terms reasonable. I guess I'm coming at this from the mindset of other programming languages, where some piece of code can be designated "deprecated" or "obsolete" to indicate that the code is bad in some way that will not change in future versions, and should be avoided. Perhaps it contains subtle unfixable errors, or is just stylistically undesirable. Whatever the equivalent status is in LaTeX, I want my package to have it.