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Jun
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comment A symbol for same order of magnitude in math mode
@egreg, thanks for the correction. I’ve edited my answer. I was confused because I checked this too fast and was mislead by the Unicode name of “≅” (\cong), APPROXIMATELY EQUAL TO, which conflicts with the modern usage of the symbol (but Unicode names have been carved in stone).
Jun
12
revised A symbol for same order of magnitude in math mode
added 2 characters in body
Jun
12
answered A symbol for same order of magnitude in math mode
Jun
12
comment A symbol for same order of magnitude in math mode
The Wikipedia page is unreliable and does not correspond to standards. According to ISO 80000-2, the symbol created using \sim expresses proportionality, which is an entirely different thing.
Jun
1
comment Why does \leq show up as \le?
Please show a complete (preferably minimal) document that reproduces the issue.
May
26
comment Typeset < > symbol
Define “ugly”. What is wrong with the rendering? Also define “nice”. And are you sure you should be using math mode? It looks like you might be trying to display HTML tags.
May
21
answered Biber Log: “\x{2018}” does not map to iso-8859-1, what does it mean
May
17
comment Hieroglyphs: How could we map several font files?
Using “glyph positions” F021 etc. seems to mean using Private Use code points and relying on specific fonts containing some hieroglyphs assigned to them. This does not sound particularly modern or robust. Using the current Unicode assignments would be the modern way, but then you need fonts that contain the hieroglyphs as properly coded, as well as tools that make use of them.
May
4
comment Typeset an upright ell
Since \ell denotes the character SCRIPT SMALL L, which is derived from an italic l (as the Unicode Standard says), it is in essence italic. It is illogical to try to make it upright.
Apr
14
answered Using unicode “combining right arrow above” to generate vector command
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
The concept “extensions of the standard unicode” does not make much sense, given what Unicode is, and I don’t see anyone having suggested such things. If you are trying to ask whether there is a character that resembles “<” but specifically denotes subgroup relation, then this is not about TeX at all. It would make perfect sense even if (heaven forbid) TeX did not exist. (And the answer is “no”.)
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
People use different symbols. And “<” is not an “inequality symbol”, it is LESS-THAN SIGN (though it can be used to denote things other than the common arithmetic relation).
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
The question which symbol should be used is a matter of conventions of mathematical notations, thus quite independent of TeX. When you have decide which symbol you wish to use (so that you can show an image of it and/or identify it as a coded character), you may have a question about displaying it using some techniques, such as TeX.
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
The question seems to be off-topic, as it is about a proper symbol for subgroup relation rather than displaying a symbol using TeX. According to MathWorld, subgroup relation is expressed using either the less-than character or a subset relation symbol.