1,012 reputation
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bio website cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela
location Finland
age 62
visits member for 2 years
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I’m an author and a consultant who specializes in character codes, localization, web authoring, accessibility, and typography. Author of Unicode Explained and Going Global with JavaScript and Globalize.js.


Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
The concept “extensions of the standard unicode” does not make much sense, given what Unicode is, and I don’t see anyone having suggested such things. If you are trying to ask whether there is a character that resembles “<” but specifically denotes subgroup relation, then this is not about TeX at all. It would make perfect sense even if (heaven forbid) TeX did not exist. (And the answer is “no”.)
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
People use different symbols. And “<” is not an “inequality symbol”, it is LESS-THAN SIGN (though it can be used to denote things other than the common arithmetic relation).
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
The question which symbol should be used is a matter of conventions of mathematical notations, thus quite independent of TeX. When you have decide which symbol you wish to use (so that you can show an image of it and/or identify it as a coded character), you may have a question about displaying it using some techniques, such as TeX.
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
The question seems to be off-topic, as it is about a proper symbol for subgroup relation rather than displaying a symbol using TeX. According to MathWorld, subgroup relation is expressed using either the less-than character or a subset relation symbol.
Apr
5
comment What are these characters Ö and Þ supposed to be and how do I configure my internet browser to have them load properly?
Ö stands for the square root symbol √ as you thought. I think the problem can be addressed without a URL, too, but it would help if you copied and pasted a relevant small piece of HTML code (where the symbols appear).
Apr
5
comment What are these characters Ö and Þ supposed to be and how do I configure my internet browser to have them load properly?
Try asking in SuperUser, but include then a URL of a problem page. The issue has nothing to do with (La)TeX. It’s really a matter of a page using a font trick to extend character repertoire, using the Symbol font. The Þ symbol is meant to show as a double arrow, “⇒” denoting implication.
Mar
28
comment Putting normal letters in between Greek ones
It’s ISO 80000-2 (and IEC 80000-2) now, available from usual ISO document distributors. And as I wrote, though mathematicians have their own habits, in physics the standard is generally followed, and the formula here is clearly a physics formula.
Mar
28
comment Putting normal letters in between Greek ones
As an aside, π should be written in upright style, using e.g. \piup from txfonts package, instead of \pi. (By standards, symbols of mathematical constants are written in upright style, not italic, and this is generally applied in physics, though very often violated in mathematics.)
Mar
27
comment WriteLatex utf-8 ģ symbol problem
The capital letter produced does not a have a cedilla but a comma. But G with cedilla, Ģ, was not the problem here: it can be written as \unichar{"0122} or inserted as such when utf8 is enabled.
Mar
27
comment WriteLatex utf-8 ģ symbol problem
Doesn’t \'{g} produce g with acute accent? So that would be a wrong character if you want g with cedilla.
Mar
9
comment Who do I have to ask, if I need a \mathsfup{\Theta} (missing unicode character)?
@LaRiFaRi, sorry for missing `, added it now. I didn’t use any extra packages. What happens when you try $\sf{\Theta}$`?
Mar
2
comment switch greek lowercase for times.sty to upright?
Why do you want to mimic incorrect rendering? And it’s not web browsers that are the culprit, it’s incorrectly coded HTML documents. (And whether a character in a regular typeface looks fatty depends on the font, on the rendering engine, and the eye of the beholder.)
Feb
8
comment Multiple diacritics on one character
The problem looks well-defined to me; it is reproducible simply by wrapping documentclass{article}\begin{document} and \end{document} around the code posted. The character does not show well here in SO either, since web browsers are not good at using multiple diacritics.
Jan
9
comment Symbol for logical equivelence
The standard symbol for logical equivalence is “⇔”. Are you sure you are looking for a different symbol (apparently, one that has not even been coded as a character in Unicode)?
Nov
25
comment HTML email typeset equations as HTML elements, not images?
How does the question relate to TeX? (BTW, the answer is “No, Unicode, HTML, and CSS are lousy tools for equations that require any serious two-dimensionality, and the limitations of email clients make the situation even lousier.”)
Nov
24
comment Using LaTeX in a Web page created in HTML
What? Why do you expect that a LaTeX notation would be interpreted by LaTeX rules on an HTML page? And what do you want if you do not want to embed the equation?
Sep
13
comment Inserting slashed zero in non-OpenType supporting LaTeX
What do you mean by “the unicode feature +zero”? The OpenType font feature zero, I presume; it is not part of Unicode but of OpenType. When supported, it simply selects a slashed glyph for digit 0, when available in a font. When the feature is not available, you would need to use a font where the normal glyph for digit 0 is slashed – or to use some technique that lays a slash over digit 0.
Jul
28
comment Monospaced font with U+1D400..U+1D7FF range (for editing)?
Mathematical symbols are inherently unsuitable for monospace rendering. Consider whether you really need monospace. People often think that all computer code must appear in monospace, but there are really no compelling reasons for that.
Jul
28
comment Monospaced font with U+1D400..U+1D7FF range (for editing)?
Everson Mono appears to be the only monospace font that contains e.g. U+1D400, see fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/1d400/fontsupport.htm
May
12
comment Bold \varnothing
The idea of upper/lower case distinction might be applicable to symbols; many fonts contain upper and lower case versions of some punctuation characters, and a similar distinction is imaginable for operators, too. It’s really the bolding that raises the question “why?” Math expressions should normally not be bolded, since bolding of letters and some symbols may indicate difference in meaning (e.g., bold letters might denote vectors). So bolding as stylistic device should be avoided.