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Nov
28
awarded  Commentator
Nov
28
comment Make \translate'd string uppercase
@cgnieder thanks for the reminder, now I did so
Nov
28
accepted Make \translate'd string uppercase
Nov
28
comment Make \translate'd string uppercase
Even though egreg's explanation is better you got the answer for my problem, I wrapped your code in a \newcommand{\weekdaynameUC}[1]{...#1->##1...} which perfectly fits my needs. Thanks @David, and thanks @egreg as well for the good explanation.
Nov
28
comment Make \translate'd string uppercase
Perhaps my MWE was a little bit to simple, actually I'd like to make \pgfcalendarweekdayname{0} uppercase. However from the answers I can't figure out how to do this, I thought it just has something to do with the correct order of expansion.
Nov
28
asked Make \translate'd string uppercase
Nov
20
accepted Capture a macro's subscripts/superscripts by the macro
Nov
20
comment Capture a macro's subscripts/superscripts by the macro
Thanks again egreg, I have to admit the example was stupid. I agree that this notion is ambiguous an I don't like it either (except for sin and cos) but that is actually not what I need it for, I thought more of something like f^*(x) or \Psi^\dagger(x) etc.
Nov
20
asked Capture a macro's subscripts/superscripts by the macro
Nov
19
comment Nomenclature definition in hidden places?
no, that was just an example. Your fix for amsmath environments is perfect. It was just pondering if there is a more general way, but the hack with the \write can't work e.g. for symbols in the same math environment, so just forget it. However, if you can imagine a more general solution, let me know but your's is sufficient for my needs. Thanks again.
Nov
19
comment Nomenclature definition in hidden places?
again great answer egreg. It does not fully answer my question as it does not explain why it does not work, but it got me on the right track, all answers are on page 227 of the TeXbook. The \write commands will be performed only on shipout. Now my question: is it possible to also set the flag a whatsit object so that it only gets set when the write did actually take places, something like \write16{\bool_gset_true:c { g_buergi_sym_ \cs_to_str:N #1 _bool }}. The later does not work like that due to missing expansion, I tried some \expandafter but had no luck so far.
Nov
19
accepted Nomenclature definition in hidden places?
Nov
15
asked Nomenclature definition in hidden places?
Oct
12
comment Increasing nesting level for parameters and global xparse macros?
sorry for misspelling your name, guess I used the unix command-line too much :) ans special thanks for the note about interface3.pdf. It's really hard to find the reference if one does not know its name especially since interface3 is not a very obvious name for it.
Oct
12
accepted Increasing nesting level for parameters and global xparse macros?
Oct
12
comment Increasing nesting level for parameters and global xparse macros?
@egrep thank you so much for your effort. With your solution I don't need the doubling any more, it's working as expected without the ugly duplicate argument. I changed O{#3} to #3 as it allows to define symbols with multiple optional arguments (the reason why I used xparse). It seems to be the perfect solution even if it looks a bit ugly :) thanks a lot.
Oct
12
comment Increasing nesting level for parameters and global xparse macros?
I've also thought of some flag approach but I thought some simple redefinition would be easier, but this seems not to be the case. Thanks a lot, I'll test your code and accept it as answer as soon as I understand the fancy expl3 syntax, never used it so far. I can't even find a good reference for all these commands, is there some good place to look things up?
Oct
12
asked Increasing nesting level for parameters and global xparse macros?