StrawberryFieldsForever

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visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Jul 9 at 14:01

Aug
24
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
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awarded  Curious
Jun
21
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
19
awarded  Popular Question
May
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awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Self-Learner
Mar
15
comment Attractive Boxed Equations
@David Hammen: The book Classical Electromagnetic Radiation, Third Edition, by Heald and Marion (which is definitely beyond high school), make heavy use of boxed equation — a habit I realized that I could probably beneficially adopt as it highlights which equations are actually important results and which you can safely skim off. As long as it makes the text easier to read, who cares about conventions and what is considered normal?
Jan
19
comment What measure in the text is it that is the font size?
Could very likely be so. Thanks.
Jan
19
comment How to display the font size in use in the final output
How do you know that the font size is a length and not a unitless number? Moreover, how do you know that the correct unit after \f@size is pt?
Jan
18
comment What point (pt) font size are \Large etc.?
How do you know that the correct unit after \f@size is pt? Isn't \f@size just a unitless number?
Jan
18
comment How to control the vertical distance between the descender and the ascender?
Now it works fine! Thanks! :)
Jan
18
comment How to control the vertical distance between the descender and the ascender?
With your method, however, the ls become exactly 5 cm tall.
Jan
18
comment How to control the vertical distance between the descender and the ascender?
You and egreg have very similar methods. In egreg's method, the size is rescaled with the ratio between the distance between the baseline and the ascender and the distance between the descender and the ascender. Now, I don't know exactly what resizebox does, because CTAN seems to be down for the moment so I can't get the documentation for the graphicx package. Anyway, I tried printing the text lql with the height 5 cm with both your methods. With your method, the distance between the descender and the ascender becomes 6.4 cm. With egreg's method, it becomes 5.0 cm.
Jan
18
accepted How to control the vertical distance between the descender and the ascender?
Jan
18
comment How to control the vertical distance between the descender and the ascender?
Well, the rectangle did get 5 cm tall after I had changed the size option. However, when writing only y or p, the result looks slightly funny, since the letter stretches significantly higher than the rectangle, which it doesn't when the text also contains some "tall" letter.
Jan
18
comment How to control the vertical distance between the descender and the ascender?
By the way, I have updated my question. Sorry for doing it now but there was a detail I forgot to mention. :P
Jan
18
comment How to control the vertical distance between the descender and the ascender?
Ah... It was completely Adobe Reader's fault. I had to change the size option from "Shrink oversized pages" to "Actual size". I thought the default LaTeX paper size for the article and report document classes was A4 (I got the same size-down in both cases).
Jan
18
revised How to control the vertical distance between the descender and the ascender?
added 403 characters in body
Jan
18
comment How to control the vertical distance between the descender and the ascender?
This actually creates an incorrect result on my computer. As a test, I printed the text lql with 5 cm height, but when I measure it on the paper it is 4.6 cm tall. By the way, what does \ratio{\fontcharht\font`l}{\fontcharht\font`l+\fontchardp\font`p} do?
Jan
18
comment How to control the vertical distance between the descender and the ascender?
This creates an incorrect result on my computer. As a test, I printed the text lql with 5 cm height, but when I measure it on the paper it is 5.9 cm tall.