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If you are interested in my TeX-related projects, you can find various TikZ libraries over at my GitHub account.

The libraries are:

  • node-families

    The node-families library has been developed in response to “Dependent node size” where the Op asks for automatic re-sizing of related nodes so that they have the same minimum size.

    Use the keys

    • Minimum Width=<family>,
    • Minimum Height=<family>,
    • Text Height=<family> and
    • Text Width=<family>

    to assign a node to a specific family of nodes that shall have the same dimensions. This works on a per-picture basis and uses the .aux file so you will need at least two compilations.

  • paths.ortho ([1] and [2])

    This library is too huge to explain it here. Take a look at my answers [3] and [4].

  • paths.rectangle

    The paths.rectangle library provides two similar timers (the functions that place nodes along paths) for the rectangle path operator. They are explained on the answer that inspired the creation of these timers.

  • patterns.images: See [5].
  • positioning-plus: See [6].

Dec
17
comment How do you accomplish stealth' with the new arrows.meta?
round is not round enough for you?
Dec
17
revised How do you accomplish stealth' with the new arrows.meta?
added 85 characters in body
Dec
17
comment Move graph nodes on a circular path while keeping the circle
@Ari How precise do you want it to be? You could calculate the exact point where the lines would start and end but the shorten > amount would skew it anyway (because it shortens on a straight line not along the path). The intersections library can always help but makes the solution much longer.
Dec
17
comment Two calls to cycle, only one appears to work. Why?
If you use nodes, TikZ applies a little magic so that the lines are only connected to the border of the nodes. The red path consists of several move-tos and line-tos. The function of -- cycle is the same as in \path (<some coordinate>) -- cycle. You can either use coordinates instead of nodes, add (t1) instead of cycle or use .center with every node depending on what you want to do. The same problem arises if you want to fill that triangle which corners are the nodes. It won’t work because you only have two simple lines.
Dec
16
comment How to avoid uppercase function name while using Function?
Welcome to TeX.SX! Your post was migrated here from Stack Overflow. Please register on this site, too, and make sure that both accounts are associated with each other (by using the same OpenID), otherwise you won't be able to comment on or accept answers or edit your question.
Dec
15
comment Computing the rectangle encompassing a node and a point
With the fit library you can just do \node[fit=(rect)(point), inner sep=+0pt,draw] {}; to achieve a rectangle that encompasses (rect) and (point). From your code, you are missing at least a few pt after the \pgfmathresults in the coordinate specification of x, y and so on.
Dec
15
reviewed No Action Needed Drawing graphs and Feynman diagrams with axodraw
Dec
15
reviewed Close Changing order of fields for @incollection / @inbook
Dec
15
reviewed Close 'Questions about my CV header and cover letter' revisited
Dec
15
comment line 66: Missing number, treated as zero \end{frame}
The second column in the second big frame misses the width argument.
Dec
14
answered How do I pass an unknown value to a choice key in pgfkeys?
Dec
14
comment Smart shifting of words in a TikZ box
How big should the green box be if half the text is wider then the box? Your task is probably easy to solve: Fill the rectangle and use path picture to place the white-text node (this will clipp automatically against the path). Then use the established anchors from that node to clip the area left of the box and place the green-text node with the same anchors. You can use the pseudo-node path picture bounding box to place the initial node in reference to the green rectangle.
Dec
13
comment Italicizing emphatic speech: Italic or upright quotation marks?
From a logical standpoint, you wouldn’t include them in the emphasization. Typographically speaking, you do include them. (This also may depend on the language you are writing in.) Just look at your example how and I as well as ! and look together: Straight vs slanted, horizontal spacing ( and I are far away from each other, ! and are very close).
Dec
13
revised Chaotic billiard with TikZ
edited tags
Dec
13
comment Smart shifting of words in a TikZ box
Why are you using \pgftext instead of \node? What do you mean with “stick out on the right too much”? It looks like both Abstract and Acknowledgments are pretty much the same length in the green box. And what do you want to shift about what length? Is there a reason you are using remember picture (with no coordinates/nodes) and overlay?
Dec
13
comment Chaotic billiard with TikZ
If you do not have the coordinate (the hits) beforehand, TikZ and its intersections library is not the tool for this task. It lacks the precision: For a circle of radius of 2 and a starting point of (45:2) and the direction -90, the result after 20 hit shows that the hits are not as expected all at (n*90+45:2) (for all integer ns). The result for 200 hits is even worse. Note that the inner empty region is shifting downwards.
Dec
13
comment Breaking an arrow with text in a flowchart
I wouldn’t overwrite the label key … Also: Should \tikzset or \tikzstyle be used to define TikZ styles?
Dec
13
comment Breaking an arrow with text in a flowchart
If you can place the node before you draw the arrow, you can use it as an intermediate point: \draw[->] (start) -- (node) -- (target);.
Dec
13
comment Breaking an arrow with text in a flowchart
Related: path with both mark connection node and arrow tip
Dec
13
comment Chaotic billiard with TikZ
(–1) What is chaotic billard? (The images you posted do not look chaotic.) How are these shapes defined? What happens here? What are the rules? What is the math behind it? What is the input? — While TikZ can calculate the direction of a curve (straight, circular, ellipsoid, Bézier) on any point, this information is pretty much forgotten after the drawing. One could help with coordinates placed along the path and the intersections library but this will need tremendous work for a chaotic billard table. Rectangles, ellipses, rounded rectangles and regular polygons: easier.