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10h
comment Where can I find this bibliography style 2?
Sorry if I've missed something, but isn't this the same style you asked about before: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/291703/… ?
14h
comment A problem with certain glyphs in EB Garamond font
You should provide us with a Minimal Working Example showing your setup, how you've loaded this font, and demonstrating this problem. The solution is likely to be revealed that way and, if not, it'll give us something to experiment with at the least
15h
comment Undefined Control Sequence Problem
I believe \href is provided by the hyperref package, without that package it's undefined (hence your error message) and you can't use it, to the best of my knowledge. Which command you should use will depend on what you want to do, but the hyperref package seems to provide lots of good options (haven't really used it myself, though)
15h
comment colored equation number and brackets
Would it be possible to help us out by providing a Minimal Working Example for us to play with?
15h
comment Undefined Control Sequence Problem
Doesn't \href take two arguments? tex.stackexchange.com/questions/33282/… Also have you loaded the hyperref package?
18h
comment How do I write Itô's with the special symbol?
@NajibIdrissi It depends who's transliterating. To quote wikipedia "Although the standard Hepburn romanization of his name is Itō, he used the spelling Itô (Kunrei-shiki romanization). The alternative spellings Itoh and Ito are also sometimes seen in the West." Which just about says it all. The spelling is really up to the individual, in the way that some Russians prefer traditional -ff to modern -v, e.g. Poliakoff/Polyakov. But yeah across languages macrons are more common for long vowels now, but the circumflex was often used for long vowels in the past, e.g. Sanskrit Kâlidâsa, now Kālidāsa
20h
comment How do I write Itô's with the special symbol?
Just so you know, that symbol is usually called a circumflex. At least, it is when it's used in words, names, etc. Mathematicians may simply call it a hat or a roof, when it is used as part of a mathematical symbol, such as the unit vector î
1d
comment Designing a notation for the “even part” or “even floor” of a number
This really seems off topic to me as it is. If you come up with the notation and then would like to know how to produce it in LaTeX (especially if you come with an MWE and even an attempt of your own) then things will be very different :)
2d
comment Forceably deleting the last page
Probably better to eliminate whatever's causing it. Would it be possible to provide an MWE showing your set up and then we might be able to help you get rid of it
Feb
10
comment A Mathjax 'cheatsheet' in LaTeX
Hi! Welcome to the site :) As it stands this question is quite hard to answer. The model we follow here is Question and Answer and it generally works best if you come to us with specific problems and a complete Minimal Working Example that demonstrates what you've done and reproduces the problems you are having.
Feb
10
comment Bit string diagram with LaTex
It certainly can if you don't mind the time and the learning curve. Take a look at TikZ and PS Tricks. Also, there's a nice comparison of the two here tex.stackexchange.com/questions/6676/…
Feb
9
comment Different symbol for g
Well, it's up to you, but please don't try to differentiate between closed ("curly" g) and open g. If you just like the look of the closed g more then it's your document, but do please bear in mind that it has no difference in meaning, and whether the change in font I think you'll need is worth it for a different g symbol is something you should carefully consider. Remember that maths uses italics and the point of the italic shape is to resemble a slanted style of handwriting (italic). very few people use a closed g in handwriting although many italic fonts do feature a closed g
Feb
9
revised Followup on \def@
markdown added
Feb
9
comment Followup on \def@
Hello there, welcome to the site. The > markdown is for quotes, when you add code, you should use code sample markdown. The easiest way to do this is just paste the code in, highlight it all and hit the Code Sample button (the one like { }) or hit Ctrl+k. The long way is to use four spaces before each line instead of the >s
Feb
9
suggested approved edit on Followup on \def@
Feb
6
accepted Modifying an existing environment, but keeping the name
Feb
5
awarded  Cleanup
Feb
5
revised Modifying an existing environment, but keeping the name
rolled back to a previous revision
Feb
5
revised Modifying an existing environment, but keeping the name
fixed grammar
Feb
5
asked Modifying an existing environment, but keeping the name