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I'm earning my PhD in mathematics and have been employed as an analyst since graduating college in 2003.


Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
@cfr Different meaning indeed. I see how that would change the connotation of my statement. Although, I disagree with Oxford Dictionary's claim that in North America, use of the word moot has anything to do with uncertainty. It has more to do with meaningless, or absence of a difference. In fact, when I wrote that, the phrase "a distinction without a difference" was in my head.
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
@cfr Oh? I'm American, so west. When I was rereading the conversation(s) to ensure I understood everything presented, I saw that my original verbiage could be interpreted as emotionally charged, so I was simply looking for a similar word without the emotional connotation.
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
@JukkaK.Korpela Rereading your comment from an hr ago, I see that you already made the distinction between symbol, character (code), and display. My question was not regarding the first, or third, but the second.
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
Thanks to everyone for their time/experience.
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
Tact: pointless -> moot
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
@SeanAllred Thank you. Illuminating.
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
Yes @JukkaK.Korpela, that is my question. The inequality symbols and the subgroup symbols, while visually indistinct, are inherently different. I was wondering if there was a separate code/character in TeX/LaTeX for the separate symbol, or whether people use the same characters. Please forgive my beginners ignorance, but I don't see how this is not what TeX/LaTeX are about.(?)
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
@JukkaK.Korpela I realize people define different platonic symbols for whatever context they're working in, and independently use various computer characters to represent those symbols, and independently display those characters in various fonts. Saying that the screen is displaying a character instead of a symbol is pointless. My statement was that since there does not seem to be any character specifically for the subgroup symbol, people use the same characters as they use for the inequality symbols.
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
@JukkaK.Korpela The feedback I'm getting seems to indicate the equivalent of: "There are probably extensions of the standard unicode that would have the symbol you're looking for, or you can make your own extension, but there is no known codepoint in the standard unicode that is specifically for what you're looking for." (I realize that in reality, é in unicode is U+00E9.)
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
@JukkaK.Korpela I see. I think my question is subtly different than that. Let me see if I can elucidate. I know the proper (acceptable) math symbol(s) to use, that is not my question. Just as "resume" will work when "résumé" is more proper, I am not asking which "e" should I use, nor am I asking about different fonts. My question would be more equivalent to: knowing that different encodings have different character sets, and knowing that (the original 128 character) ASCII encoding does not have "é", asking the unicode community what (if any) is the unicode codepoint for "é".
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
Thanks @moewe, MattAllegro, egreg for your input (I'd vote your comments up if I could, but le sigh). It seems there is no special/distinct code/symbol, which explains the negative results of my original search.
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
@JukkaK.Korpela How does that distinction make it off topic? The example on MathWorld shows me what it looks like (which I already knew), but doesn't tell me the code used. My question is whether there is a specific TeX/LaTeX code for subgroup (like \setminus when one could just use \backslash or \) or whether everyone just uses \lt, \le, etc.
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
@SeanAllred I realize TeX is for typesetting in general and not just for math, but I'm not quite sure what you're getting at. I know they're all different, but I can't explain the difference between TeX and LaTeX, and it seems most people use them interchangeably. I think of LaTeX as some sort of extension of TeX and so TeX:LaTeX:{MathJax, etc.} as C:C++:compilers. Did I misuse the word rendering? In order to see the typesetting, you have to have something render it first right?
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
@PeterGrill Hmm, I'd think the desire to show the code alongside the rendering would be useful enough in order to not require the effort cost of generating, uploading, and linking images (as well as the file storage cost). Incidentally, I've favorited that post so I can find the links to TeX-to-image tools referenced there (even though it wouldn't render a simple $\lt$ for me). How can I find favorited questions again later on SE sites?
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
@PeterGrill Strange that the TeX site wouldn't render TeX. No, the triangle (a closed less than symbol) is the intrinsic property of any symbol for normal subgroup (including or not including an underline etc, are all ancillary to the left pointing triangle). When handwritten, the plain subgroup symbol is the same as the less-than character < on the comma key on the keyboard. For formatting purposes, \lt is preferred over < in inequalities. Similarly, we use \setminus instead of \ or \backslash. I'm wondering if there's something other than < or \lt for "subgroup".
Apr
13
comment What is the TeX/LaTeX symbol for subgroup (not normal subgroup)?
Woah. And why isn't my LaTeX displaying right in the question?