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May
20
comment Configurable spacing after \dots
The spacing is the same, but the question mark is farther right than with the colon or the exclamation mark.
May
20
comment new command with cases?
@lalebarde Update your TeX distribution.
May
20
comment Breakable period
@Sverre You do want the hyphen. ;-)
May
20
comment More space between certain rows in a table
@Chris *{5}{S[...]} means “five columns with the specified type”. If you want, say, three left aligned columns, just type \begin{tabular}{lll} or the shorthand \begin{tabular}{*{3}{l}}.
May
20
answered Breakable period
May
20
comment Bibtex: two months with dates
The date should be part of the conference title.
May
20
answered new command with cases?
May
20
comment Bibtex: two months with dates
You can use month={29 }#nov#{--2 }#dec, but it's misusing the field.
May
20
comment Bibtex: two months with dates
The month field doesn't refer to the date when the conference took place, but to the month in which the proceedings were published.
May
20
answered space after characters with carons
May
20
revised space after characters with carons
Code formatting
May
20
comment Multiple consecutive \par's equivalent to just one?
That's cheating twice!
May
20
comment Multiple consecutive \par's equivalent to just one?
This is cheating!
May
20
revised Nodes and text positioning
Simpler version
May
20
answered Nodes and text positioning
May
20
comment Stix font not in Adobe Illustrator (Windows)
The font names refer to the Type1 fonts that are found in <TEX root>/fonts/type1/public/stix, not to the OpenType fonts.
May
20
awarded  Guru
May
20
comment Multiple consecutive \par's equivalent to just one?
@FangJing Yes, unless you're doing strange things in the output routine. In LaTeX's verbatim \par is essentially \leavevmode\endgraf (where \endgraf is a duplicate of the primitive \par).
May
20
comment Lots of “missing character” messages in log file
In the definition of \pgfmathdivide@ there is \pgfmath@x =#1pt and #1, in this case, is \pgfarrowlength; so the pt gets typeset; it wouldn't if #1 were a number. This appears also for #2. Similarly in \pgfmathsqrt@, \pgfmathcos@, \pgfmathsin@.
May
20
answered Multiple consecutive \par's equivalent to just one?