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May
12
comment Typesetting before TeX and computers?
What are those symbols in the center of the type bar (PU2 and some monogram)?
Mar
17
comment Fonts, italics and IPA 'a' characters
@Sverre It's possible they simply did this because they had no way to achieve the desired shape with ɑ - they use Ɑ as the uppercase (with nothing done to change its shape) - apparently the proper shape in both cases is that of the greek alpha, but it should be encoded with the latin alpha character (uppercase greek alpha, of course, has an entirely inappropriate shape for this purpose) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_alpha
Mar
17
awarded  Commentator
Mar
17
comment Fonts, italics and IPA 'a' characters
@hftf as I noted in my edit Wikipedia says ɑ should look more like Greek alpha in this context (The real Greek alpha can't actually be used for this because the uppercase version needs to look like a bigger version whereas uppercase Greek alpha looks like A).
Mar
17
comment Fonts, italics and IPA 'a' characters
I don't know what context you would be using g in that could be confused with IPA, though. I also would think it unusual to see an italic two-story a in a non-IPA context. Are there any alphabets other than IPA that use both versions of either as distinct letters? EDIT: Apparently both a and ɑ are used in Cameroon, but ɑ should look more like Greek alpha in this context according to wikipedia.
Mar
17
comment Fonts, italics and IPA 'a' characters
Does this g have a particular linguistic meaning? It's not in the IPA.
Nov
30
comment UNIX timestamp (= seconds since 1/1/1970) in document?
Did you not notice which stackexchange this is? Your answer isn't exactly TeX-relevant.
Oct
7
comment Did the “Computer Modern” font families become a default because they're well tested and proven, or chance?
If page breaks are the concern, wouldn't it suffice to have the same metrics?
Oct
4
comment How do I write a recurring decimal in LaTeX?
@Egon How would you write 1.23453(45)? As "1.234534545..."?
May
1
comment Why are URLs typeset with monospace fonts by default?
It depends on the type of URL you are using. We have the luxury that URLs used today tend to be as easy as plain text to infer the usage of 1 vs l vs I from context. Even non-"coding-font" monospace fonts tend to distinguish well between the three due to the need to expand serifs to fill horizontal space.
Mar
19
comment Ligatures: why “fi”, but not “fj” as well?
@barbarabeeton why do glyphs have to be identified based on unicode (or pua) at all? I'm saying each glyph could have an arbitrary id (a=1 b=2 c=3 d=4 e=5 f=6 fi=7 fj=8 g=9, say), some of these are mapped to code points (but not fj), and some are in the ligature table (both fi and fj). There doesn't need to be an "alternative", because the need to have a code point to identify it doesn't exist at all.
Mar
19
comment Ligatures: why “fi”, but not “fj” as well?
@tohecz The symbols like "fi" in unicode are only there because they were present in older encodings (like adobe or apple) that had more limitations. Modern systems don't need a "fj" character to have a "fj" glyph in the font. If they were absent, we could still have a "fi" ligature that is only used by using the two letters normally.
Feb
28
comment Ligatures: why “fi”, but not “fj” as well?
I don't see how it "guarantees that use of the private use area is unavoidable" - fonts aren't required to assign code points to all their glyphs.