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comment Changing the Color of a Tikz Spline Midway
See tex.stackexchange.com/a/116489/86 for an implementation using hobby's algorithm for specifying the curve.
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comment Best Practice: Match different Journal specifications
@IgorKotelnikov Doing so in parallel may be against such policies, but doing so in series is most assuredly not. Some articles go through the 'submit-wait-reject' cycle many times before finding their natural home so it's not unnatural to submit an article to several journals in its lifetime. Moreover, some archival repositories have strange requirements and it's common to upload the manuscript to several repositories as well as submitting to a journal. So it is a perfectly reasonable thing to have several simultaneous versions of an article, and therefore this is a sensible question.
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comment Best Practice: Match different Journal specifications
@FedericoPoloni The best you'll get is me putting it on github. It's not pretty code, and each additional journal needs to be added by hand. I could make it modular, I suppose, but even then it's a pain to work out what a new journal needs (the one that used \obeylines was a particular favourite of mine!). Moreover, I no longer need such a class so have no interest in maintaining it.
Dec
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comment Best Practice: Match different Journal specifications
@cfr The journals I used to submit to all required LaTeX source code in the end (some were fine with PDF at submission, but wanted the LaTeX if accepted). I've no idea what I would do for DOC/DOCX. On initial submission, I would just send the LaTeX file with the class & style files attached (and I'd include a PDF) and wait to see if I got any complaints. If the article was accepted, then I would take the time to remove all my customisations but I wouldn't mind that because the article was accepted. It's doing it prior to acceptance that I objected to.
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answered Best Practice: Match different Journal specifications
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Dec
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comment Beamer: error while making handouts
@gigabytes See tex.stackexchange.com/q/6582/86, I think it does what you want.
Dec
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comment How to draw topological surfaces?
Vaguely related: tex.stackexchange.com/q/17031/86
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comment How to upload LaTeX-generated pdf paper to arXiv without LaTexXsources
@JoshuaGrochow You may have known that, but others reading these comments may not. Experience tells me that I am extremely unlikely to convince you that your purported reason does not outweigh the arXiv's reason for wanting them. So at this point I'm "talking to the crowd" and my aim is to show that if one is worried about comments then it's quite easy to remove them and still comply with the arXiv's policy.