6

Assume the following code:

    \usepackage{amssymb}
      \usepackage{graphicx}   % if you want to include graphics files
      \usepackage{amsmath}
      \usepackage{amsthm}\begin{document}

    \begin{document}


       % author information

       % first author 

       \author{Author 1}
       \address{University 1}
       \email{email 1}

       % second author

       \author{Author 2}

       % the address where the research was carried out
       \address{University 2}

       % current address, usually not needed because it is the same as the
       % regular address

       \email{email 2}

       % title

       \title{Title}
    \end{document}

How can I set a footnote to the authors (1 the the first and 2 to the second), such that at the end of the paper the number indicates which email address belongs to which author? For short I would like to have something like: Author 1^1 and at the end ^1 Email-address: email_1.

Thanks for your help.

1 Answer 1

6

You can use the optional argument to \address or to \email

\documentclass{amsart}
\begin{document}
% author information
% first author 
\author{Author 1}
\address[Author 1]{University 1}
\email{email 1}

% second author
\author{Author 2}
\address[Author 2]{University 2}
\email[Corresponding author]{email 2}

\title{Title}
\maketitle

\end{document}

enter image description here

4
  • What if there are three authors from University 2 and you want to use one footnote for all three? You can't do like \address[this, that and the other]{University 2}.
    – Untitled
    Jul 12, 2016 at 11:16
  • @Untitled Why not?
    – egreg
    Jul 12, 2016 at 11:21
  • What I meant was that (this, that and the other) looks too big for a label. I prefer something more like a dagger, small. Do you think that can be done in amsart?
    – Untitled
    Jul 13, 2016 at 17:50
  • @Untitled The amsart class prints the information about the authors at the very end, so symbols would refer to something quite far away.
    – egreg
    Jul 13, 2016 at 17:52

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