10

I'm playing around with biblatex at the moment. It works nice, but there is a problem with a translation of "Ed." (edition) to "Aufl." (Auflage). The translation is correct but it has a wrong ligature there. It should be "Auf"|l.". Can I override the translation somehow? Or is this ligature correct because the rules for ligatures do not apply to abbrevations?

Here is a MWE:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[german]{babel}
\usepackage[babel, german=quotes]{csquotes}
\usepackage[natbib=true, style=phys, articletitle=false,biblabel=brackets,%
        chaptertitle=false,pageranges=false%
        ]{biblatex}
\addbibresource{lit.bib}

\begin{document}
    \nocite{*}
    \printbibliography[env=bibliography, title=Literaturverzeichnis]
\end{document}

and lit.bib:

@book{Seeger1997,
  edition = {6},
  title = {{Semiconductor Physics. An Introduction.}},
  isbn = {3540615075},
  publisher = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
  author = {Seeger, Karlheinz},
  month = jan,
  year = {1997}
}

enter image description here

11

According to at least one source, abbreviations do indeed follow special rules. Quoting Struckmann, Einige typographische Grundregeln und ihre Umsetzung mit LaTeX [Some basic typographic rules and their implementation in LaTeX] (2007), p. 7 [translation mine]:

If an abbrevation ends with two characters which can form a ligature, the ligature is applied: Aufl. [typeset with ligature] (but Auflage [typeset without ligature]), gefl. [with ligature] (but gefälligst).

(EDIT: Struckmann doesn't offer a direct source for this rule, but states at p. 1 that most of the rules in his paper are taken from other sources, often verbatim. Therefore, it's very likely that the Duden is the actual source.)

Should you nevertheless want to remove the ligature from "Aufl.", here's how to do it:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[german]{babel}
\usepackage[babel, german=quotes]{csquotes}
\usepackage[natbib=true, style=phys, articletitle=false,biblabel=brackets,%
        chaptertitle=false,pageranges=false%
        ]{biblatex}

\shorthandon{"}
\DefineBibliographyStrings{german}{%
  edition = {Auf"|l\adddot},
}
\shorthandoff{"}

\usepackage{filecontents}

\begin{filecontents}{\jobname.bib}
@book{Seeger1997,
  edition = {6},
  title = {{Semiconductor Physics. An Introduction.}},
  isbn = {3540615075},
  publisher = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
  author = {Seeger, Karlheinz},
  month = jan,
  year = {1997}
}
\end{filecontents}

\addbibresource{\jobname.bib}

\nocite{*}

\begin{document}

\printbibliography[env=bibliography, title=Literaturverzeichnis]

\end{document}

enter image description here

  • The ligature rules are more complicated then I thought. Indeed I have seen 'Aufl.' [typeset with ligature] in a Springer book. I always thought it was a mistake. Thanks a lot! – quinmars Apr 10 '13 at 23:01
  • 2
    This is consistent with what the 19th edition of Duden is quoted to say in the readme of the rmligs deligaturization script: “Schließt eine Abkürzung mit zwei Buchstaben, die eine Ligatur bilden können, dann wird diese angewendet. Aufl. (aber: Auf"|lage), gefl. (aber: gefällig, gefälligst)”. (If an abbreviation ends with two letters that can form a ligature, the ligature is applied.) However, I couldn’t find these rules in more recent editions, and their choice of examples doesn’t really convince me at all. – doncherry Apr 11 '13 at 3:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.