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I have an inline equation that I don't want to split in lines.

If I use

foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar ${ B = A \cap \{ T \leq n \} }$

It doesn't fit in the page's width and there's a part of the equation that can't be seen.

If I use

foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar $B = A \cap \{ T \leq n \}$

it is split like:

output

I could do something like:

foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar \\
$B = A \cap \{ T \leq n \}$

To keep it in only one line, but I wonder if there is an standard way to tell latex: "Keep it in only one line and if it doesn't fit in the page's width then start in a new line".

This headers are important in order to reproduce the issue:

\documentclass[a5paper,oneside]{amsart}
\usepackage[scale={.8,.85}]{geometry}
  • 2
    You could wrap the inline equation inside \mbox{$...$}, but if this itself is too long, it may not wrap regardless. See How to prevent LaTeX from line-breaking a phrase? and How can I make a pair of words stick together in line breaks? More generally, math content will only be broken at the text block boundary at certain symbols (or operators). You must have a string of stuff that doesn't break well. Please provide more context in the form of a minimal working example (MWE). – Werner Apr 15 '13 at 4:36
  • \mbox{$...$} behaves exactly the same way as ${...}$ does. If the equation is too long, there is a part of the equation that can't be seen in the document because it doesn't respect the margins. The main problem is that I don't know what the final width should be, so if it is changed, I'll need to review the whole document for cases like this one. – htellez Apr 15 '13 at 6:08
  • 2
    Your image output doesn't match the input, sadly, and recreating input from your output doesn't provide the (apparently) undesired line break. However, I guess the point is made. Rephrase your sentence to allow for a more appropriate break. Or, you could try the suggestion followed in Prevent the overflow of text. – Werner Apr 15 '13 at 6:36
3

enter image description here

Your choices include (1) leaving it as it is or (2) Preventing line breaking and letting it stick out (not really an option) or (3) allowing the break only at some places eg after the = (but that makes no difference in this case) or (4) use an glue/penalty combination that allows the line to fall short (which is like manually adding \\ but as in that case not really visually acceptable) or (5) using \sloppy or sloppypar.

\documentclass{article}

\parskip=2\baselineskip
\newcommand\possiblebreak{\ifhmode\unskip\space\hfil\penalty0\hfilneg\fi}
\begin{document}

1 foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar
$B = A \cap \{ T \leq n \}$
foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar
foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar

2 foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar
${B = A \cap \{ T \leq n \}}$
foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar
foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar

3 foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar
${B = {A \cap \{ T \leq n \}}}$
foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar
foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar

4 foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar\possiblebreak
${B = A \cap \{ T \leq n \}}$
foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar
foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar


\begin{sloppypar}
5 foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar
${B = A \cap \{ T \leq n \}}$
foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar
foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar foo bar
\end{sloppypar}


\end{document}

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