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If there's a better package to handle this than eemeir, I haven't found it yet. I looked at he-she, but I don't really want to alternate, I just want to be able to quickly change the gender of pronouns for different people in a text (for example, a student, a parent, etc.).

eemeir's documentation seems to indicate that defining a new word pair will make the neutral form of the word a valid command with correct gender assignment, but it appears to use the default gender instead.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[female]{eemeir}

\begin{document}

\newwordpair{\child}{son}{daughter}
\male[child]

Why does \verb|\child| return \child (using the default gender),
but \verb|\child[child]| returns \child[child] (using the assigned gender)?

\end{document}

Any ideas? Or suggestions on adapting he-she to my use?

1 Answer 1

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This is how the package works. After

\newwordpair{\child}{son}{daughter}

the expansion of \child ends with \@eemeirword which is a command with an optional argument (and empty default).

If you call \child you end up the package macros examining \ifmale which, in your example, is false because of the package option. If you call \child[foo] the conditional \ifmalefoo is examined. This conditional is set up either with \male[foo] or \female[foo].

Instead of \male[child] you should issue something like

\male[XY]

so that you can call \child[XY] and use XY for all word pairs.

Here's an example:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[female]{eemeir}

\begin{document}

\newwordpair{\child}{son}{daughter}
\newwordpair{\parent}{father}{mother}
\male[XY]
\female[XX]

\verb|\child| returns \child (which should be feminine)

\verb|\parent| returns \parent (which should be feminine)

\verb|\child[XY]| returns \child[XY] (which should be masculine)

\verb|\parent[XY]| returns \parent[XY] (which should be masculine)

\bigskip
\swapgender

Now genders are swapped

\bigskip

\verb|\child| returns \child (which should be masculine)

\verb|\parent| returns \parent (which should be masculine)

\verb|\child[XX]| returns \child[XX] (which should be feminine)

\verb|\parent[XX]| returns \parent[XX] (which should be feminine)

\end{document}

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