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Through this site I learned how to extract font information from pdf and found out that it might be mathdesign. But why adobe acrobat pro tells me it is CMSSBX10? I want to use the same font in my latex document and when using mathdesign it seems to be the one I want.

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    Presumably if acrobat says the font is cmssbx10 then it is that font (computer modern sans serif bold extended 10pt). With no other information what other answer could you expect? May 6, 2013 at 20:43
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    Back in the day when I was completely new to LaTeX, I remember being confused by the font info in my output document too... It didn't look like the name of any font I had encountered before.
    – jub0bs
    May 6, 2013 at 21:22
  • Your MWE, please!
    – smh
    May 6, 2013 at 22:21

1 Answer 1

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Computer Modern is available in different optical sizes. See this explanation from Adobe: http://www.adobe.com/type/topics/opticalsize.html So basically Acrobat is telling you, that the font in use is Computer Modern sans serif bold extended 10pt.

Mathdesign is a package which allows you to select a family of math fonts compatible to your selected text font. So if you use Utopia in your text, you can select proper math fonts for your text.

\usepackage[adobe-utopia]{mathdesign}
\usepackage[utopia]{mathdesign}

However, if you use mathdesign alone, the standard Computer Modern will be selected for both your text and math.

You also have other options to select compatible text and math fonts with other packages. Mathpazo(usepackage{mathpazo}) allows you to use Palatino for your text and math with one package.

\usepackage{libertine}
\usepackage[libertine]{newtxmath}

gives you Libertine for your text and compatible glyphs for your math.

This answer gives you a good overview of the different text and math fonts: https://tex.stackexchange.com/a/59706/16557

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