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\documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article}
\usepackage{amssymb,amsmath,amsthm,amsfonts}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{natbib}
\usepackage{tabularx}
\usepackage{lscape}
\usepackage{dcolumn}
\usepackage{longtable}
\bibliographystyle{chicago}
\setcitestyle{notesep={: }}

I want to (i) remove parentheses and put full stop behind eds., (ii) change the comma after the title to a full stop, (iii) remove "pp." and put pages numbers at the back and (iv) after publisher (and before the page numbers) should be : rather than .

I guess I should go change "chicago.bst" but I do not find where I should make the changes.

@incollection{Ballwieser-global-history-2010,
booktitle={A Global History of Accounting, Financial Reporting and Public Policy: Europe},
author={Wolfgang Ballwieser},
title={Germany},
pages={59-88},
editor={Previts, G.J. and Walton, P.J. and Wolnizer, P.W.},
year={2010},
address={United Kingdom},
publisher={Emerald Group Publishing Limited},
}

Ballwieser, W. (2010). Germany. In G. Previts, P. Walton, and P. Wolnizer (Eds.), A Global History of Accounting, Financial Reporting and Public Policy: Europe. pp. 59–88. United Kingdom: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

The following is what I am looking for

Ballwieser, W. (2010). Germany. In G. Previts, P. Walton, and P. Wolnizer, eds. A Global History of Accounting, Financial Reporting and Public Policy: Europe. United Kingdom: Emerald Group Publishing Limited: 59–88.

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    Just a comment: If the modifications you want to make are a result of wanting to adhere to a particular organisation's guidelines, you might find that the necessary BibTeX style exists already. Somewhere. – John Wickerson May 11 '13 at 12:11
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In the code below, I show how you can edit the file chicago.bst -- rename it to mychicago.bst in the process, please -- to remove the string pp. before the page range.

For all other modifications you're looking to achieve, I think you're much better off not trying to hack an existing .bst file. Instead, you should look to crate a new, custom bibliography style file from scratch with the help of the makebst utility (part of the custom-bib package). At a command prompt, type latex makebst and follow the detailed prompts; at the end of the long series of prompts, type "y" to instruct the utility to create the .bst file. :-)

Back to the (relatively) simple task of suppressing the string pp. in front of page ranges:

  • Find the file chicago.bst in your TeX distribution, make a copy, and name the copy (say) mychicago.bst. Do not edit an original file directly.

  • Open the file mychicago.bst in a plain-text editor.

  • Find the function format.pages (ca. l. 680 in my copy of the bst file)

  • A few lines down from the function's header line, locate the lines

        { "pp.\ " pages n.dashify tie.or.space.connect } % gnp - removed ()
        { "pp.\ " pages tie.or.space.connect }
    

    and replace them with

        { pages n.dashify tie.or.space.connect } % gnp - removed ()
        { pages tie.or.space.connect }
    
  • Save the file, and start using it via the instruction \bibliographystyle{mychicago}.

That said, I really do recommend that you run the makebst utility and, when answering some of the prompts, simply specify that no pp. strings should be used.

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You can remove the "pp." and "p." from single entries by adding

pagination = {none}

to the bibliography entry, i.e. inside a @book or so.

  • 1
    With a "real" example as an entry with your solution, your answer will be better ;-) – Romain Picot Oct 7 '15 at 13:17
  • Does your answer pertain to a bibtex-based or a biblatex-based solution? – Mico Oct 7 '15 at 13:24
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    Oops, I use biblatex, sorry. I wrote more extensively in a question about citing classics on how to use this, just wanted to add it here as well as to reach more people, but in doing so did not properly notice the difference between bibtex and biblatex. – JSilvanus Oct 8 '15 at 17:33

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