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I apologise for a question that might seem naïve to many. However, I encountered a problem and a couple of hours of an intensive research didn't bring any results. Basically, I would like to have a line engraved into a ring in the same font that TeX uses for math. I am to send the font in question to the jeweller, along with the line. However, I am in confusion as to what I am supposed to send. I found out that the font would probably be either Computer Modern or Latin Modern; but when I tried to download that, I got a number of fonts and none of them seemed to be what I was looking for. Also, since the line includes the symbols 'á' and 'š', I need the font to have these. If you could be so kind as to advise me on where to get the right font, I'd be grateful. I am enclosing the line so that you can picture what I mean. Thanks in advance. Z.

Edit: What I did not know was that the PDF output was, in fact, a vector graphic, so I'll try to send that to the jeweller instead and see what happens.

$\forall d \in days : d > 0 \iff (áName \cup šName)$
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    Ask the jeweller whether a PDF file with the required text printed in the required font will do. If not, ask what the jeweller needs. Then get back to this site with a more specific request, perhaps. – Benjamin McKay May 29 '13 at 11:14
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    (I wasn't going to get into a discussion about the line itself, though I appreciate your corrections, but maybe I should clarify that the line is to be read "A day is positive if and only if A and B are united". – Zuzana May 29 '13 at 11:27
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    PPS: »The jeweller said he needed either the specific font« ...I'm wondering what he's going to do with the font once he's got it: use the TeX code to produce -- a PDF? Or bypass PDF creation by feeding the code directly to a Lua-powered engraving machine? – Nils L May 29 '13 at 11:43
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    @Zuzana -- you might add to the question the fact that the jeweler can handle the line as a vector graphic. i think there might be a more useful answer for that approach (though i can't give it). – barbara beeton May 29 '13 at 12:21
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    Thanks a lot for your help. I'll try to send the PDF output to the jeweller and let you know what happens. Thanks also for the thumbs up for the romantic aspect of my question! Przemysław, I see what you mean. I'll discuss it with the other set in the evening :-) – Zuzana May 29 '13 at 12:30
1

http://www.ctan.org/tex-archive/fonts/cm/ps-type1/bakoma/otf/ seems to have many variations of the Computer Modern font. Are any of those what you are looking for?

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    What the person downvoting you without a comment probably meant to say is that this is more like a comment than an answer. Besides, the problem has already been solved. In any case, shame on the downvoter. – Christian Jun 7 '13 at 14:31
1

I'm sorry if I misunderstood your question, but I'll do my best.

There are many (and I mean MANY) packages to accommodate encoding of different "delicate" symbols like rare letters from little known languages. Vietnamese, Chinese, Slovenian (my language; you've probably never heard of it) etc. are all represented by plethora of CTAN packages. So to start, we're going to solve your issue of displaying á and š.

Let's start with the easier one, á. We can get a solid result even without any additional packages (don't get confused by amsmath package, I only let it in because without it functions \forall, \in, \iff and \cup can't be compiled). Here's the code:

\documentclass[13,legalpaper]{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}
$\forall d \in days : d > 0 \iff (\acute{a}Name \cup šName)$
\end{document}

Here you can see, that á got substituted by \acute{a}. But now we have a problem. If you only intend on using this command in math mode, that's fine, but if you want output it in text mode that won't work. To achieve the latter, we must turn to a different command:

\documentclass[13,legalpaper]{article}

\begin{document}
\'{a}
\end{document}

Here we see that á is once again replaced, this time with \'{a}.

Now onto š. Once again, in math mode, a substitution should suffice:

\documentclass[13,legalpaper]{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}
$\forall d \in days : d > 0 \iff (\acute{a}Name \check{s}Name)$
\end{document}

And in the normal text:

\documentclass[13,legalpaper]{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}
\v{s}
\end{document}

Note that if you want to have serif á and/or š, you don't have to use math mode! You can simply italicise the whole thing altogether:

\documentclass[13,legalpaper]{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}
\textit{\'{a} \v{s}}
\end{document}

BUT THIS IS NOT THE BEST WAY TO GO ABOUT!!!

Now I'm going to bring out the big guns: encoding. Who would want to write \'{a} and/or \v{s} every time he/she wants to write such a character in his/her native language? No one. That's why LaTex has a wonderful package called babel. Let me show you (a quick note: I'm using slovene package, because I'm from Slovenia (google it) you can use any version of bable, but I personally advise you to use the one that corresponds to your native language; hence the "standard" babel formula: \usepackage[INSERT YOUR LANGUAGE HERE]{babel}):

\documentclass[13,legalpaper]{article}

\usepackage[slovene]{babel}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}

\begin{document}
áš
\end{document}

Simple as that! I have to mention that you MUST include \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} as it indicates the compilation protocol. All languages with exotic letters must do that as the adherent Tex compiler isn't advanced enough to handle these newer symbols. And once you've done that you're set! Just watch (note: don't get confused by \setlength{\parindent}{0cm}, it's just a bit of code that removes space before paragraph, so everything is aligned correctly):

\documentclass[13,legalpaper]{article}

\usepackage[slovene]{babel}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}

\begin{document}

\setlength{\parindent}{0cm}

This is a normal text: Upám, da ti je bil ta odgovor v pomoč!\\
This is an italicised text: \textit{Upám, da ti je bil ta odgovor v  pomoč!}\\
This is symbol usage in math mode: $\check{z} + \check{s} + \check{c} = \acute{a}$

\end{document}

enter image description here Important: Do NOT try to write š, č, á etc. in math mode. This will only produce a large amount of errors. Remember: WE USE ONLY MATH ACCENTS IN MATH MODE!

And a quick tutorial on how to change the font:

\documentclass[13,legalpaper]{article}

\usepackage[slovene]{babel}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}

\usepackage{times}

\begin{document}

\setlength{\parindent}{0cm}

This is a normal text: Upám, da ti je bil ta odgovor v pomoč!\\
This is an italicised text: \textit{Upám, da ti je bil ta odgovor v pomoč!}\\
This is symbol usage in math mode: $\check{z} + \check{s} + \check{c} = \acute{a}$

\end{document}

enter image description here Note the \usepackage{times} I added to change text font from Computer Modern to Times New Roman. Easy, isn't it? Well, of course you must first know font name in order to compile it. If you compile the code, you can see that math font DIDN'T change. If you want to accommodate the latter as well, you can perform some other LaTex tricks, which are a bit more complicated, but I'm sure you'll get through. Just read this brilliant post: how to select math font in document.

I hope this post was helpful. I wish you countless hours of fun with LaTex!

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