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I've tried to search for it, but I couldn't seem to find an answer to my question, so here goes.

Let's say I'm writing a report of some sort. I'm up 50 pages or so, and at least 100 equations. Then, I'm told that the report has to be a two-column report, which is easy to do in LaTeX. But, my 100 equations are kinda made so they would fit a whole page, which means that, let's say, 50 of my equations are to wide for the columns, and they are all going outside the margin or even the paper it self.

My question is: Is there any way, automatically, without going in and inserting a split command in each of the wide equations, and tell each of them where to split, to split them up so they will fit the columns ? So maybe LaTeX would just recognize when they are to long, and then just split it up onto the next line.

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    If they are currently single line equation you could switch them to breqn package dmath to get automatic breaking. If they are currently already align or similar display environments but set too wide, then probably manually reflowing them is your best option. – David Carlisle May 31 '13 at 18:56
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    .. or wrap them in \begin{figure*} so they float as full width insertions to the top of the page (may require rewording the surrounding text though)... – David Carlisle May 31 '13 at 18:57
  • I see... No totally easy way then :) Thanks anyway :) – Denver Dang May 31 '13 at 19:04
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    @DavidCarlisle Could you write up your comments as an answer (plus perhaps 'Short answer: No'!) – Joseph Wright Aug 17 '13 at 9:55
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There is no easy or fully automatic way.

If they are currently single line equation you could switch them to breqn package dmath to get automatic breaking. If they are currently already using align or similar display environments but set too wide, then probably manually reflowing them is your best option.

Or if it is acceptable, you could wrap them in \begin{figure*} so they float as full width insertions to the top of the page (this may require rewording the surrounding text though).

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