1

I am having to use the minted environment inside a minipage environment quite often in my document. I wanted to write a new environment for doing this, but since minted isn't designed to be included inside other environments, I decided to write a small patch using minted internals, based on Using minted to define a new environment and am including this patch in my main document. However, it still doesn't seem to work.

Error message:

Paragraph ended before \FV@BeginScanning was complete \begin{cppcode}[10.7cm]

Can someone help me figure out what I'm doing wrong?

Here is the code for the "patch". It re-defines the \newminted shortcut command to incorporate the minipage environment in the custom minted environments, using a couple of nested conditionals to check whether an optional minipage width has been provided or not.

\makeatletter
\DeclareDocumentCommand \newminted {o m m}
{
  \IfNoValueTF {#1} % check if custom env. name is provided, and create new env. accordingly
   {\def\minted@envname{#2code}}
   {\def\minted@envname{#1}}
  \DeclareDocumentEnvironment {\minted@envname} {o} % default env.
   {  % begin definition
     \IfNoValueTF {##1} 
     {  % minipage width not provided

        \VerbatimEnvironment\begin{minted}[#3]{#2}    

     }
     {  % minipage width provided

        \VerbatimEnvironment
        \minted@resetoptions
        \setkeys{minted@opt}{#3}
        \centering
        \begin{minipage}{##1}    
        \begin{VerbatimOut}{\jobname.pyg}

     }
   }
   {  % end definition
     \IfNoValueTF {##1}
     {  % minipage width not provided

        \end{minted}

     }
     {  % minipage width provided

        \end{VerbatimOut}
         \minted@pygmentize{#2}
        \DeleteFile{\jobname.pyg}
        \end{minipage}

     }   
   }

   \DeclareDocumentEnvironment {\minted@envname *} {m o}    % custom env. name
   { % begin definition
     \IfNoValueTF {##2}
     {  % minipage width not provided

        \VerbatimEnvironment\begin{minted}[#3,##1]{#2}

     }
     {  % minipage width provided

        \VerbatimEnvironment
        \minted@resetoptions
        \setkeys{minted@opt}{#3,##1}
        \centering
        \begin{minipage}{##2}    
        \begin{VerbatimOut}{\jobname.pyg}

     }
    }       
    { % end definition
        \IfNoValueTF {##2}
        {   % minipage width not provided

            \end{minted}

        }
        {   % minipage width provided

            \end{VerbatimOut}
            \minted@pygmentize{#2}
            \DeleteFile{\jobname.pyg}
            \end{minipage}

        }  
     }
}
\makeatother

Here is the MWE using the above code:

\documentclass[10pt]{article}

\usepackage{xparse}    

% Page layout
\usepackage[landscape,margin=0.5in]{geometry}
\usepackage{multicol}    

% Code
\usepackage{minted}
\definecolor{col}{HTML}{F5EAB5}

\input{minted_patch2.tex} % CONTAINS THE PATCHED CODE

\usemintedstyle{trac}
\newminted{cpp}{bgcolor=col, linenos=true}
\newcommand{\keyw}[1]{\texttt{\textbf{#1}}}    

\title{}
\author{}
\date{}

\begin{document}
\begin{multicols}{2}
\maketitle

\section{Primitive Built-in Types}

\subsection{Literals}

Every literal has a type determined by its \textit{form} and \textit{value}

\subsubsection{Integer \& Floating Point Literals}

Integer literals can be represented using \textbf{decimal}, \textbf{octal}, or \textbf{hexadecimal} notations. Integer
literals that begin with \texttt{0} (zero) are interpreted as octal. Those that begin with either
\texttt{0x} or \texttt{0X} are interpreted as hexadecimal:

% Minipage width specified. NO on-the-fly options

\begin{cppcode}[10.7cm]
20 /* decimal */ 024 /* octal */ 0x14 /* hexadecimal */
\end{cppcode}

By default, decimal literals are signed. whereas octal and hexadecimal literals can either  be signed or unsigned. Decimal literal has the smallest type of \keyw{int}, \keyw{long}, or \keyw{long long} in which the value fits. Octal and hexadecimal literals have the smallest type of \keyw{int}, \keyw{unsigned int}, \keyw{long}, \keyw{unsigned long}, \keyw{long long}, or \keyw{unsinged long long}

Floating-point literals include either a decimal point or an exponent specified using scientific notation. Using scientific notation, the exponent is indicated by either E or e:

% Minipage width specified. WITH on-the-fly options

\begin{cppcode*}{linenos=false}[6cm]
3.14159 3.14159E0 0. 0e0 .001
\end{cppcode*} 

\end{multicols}
\end{document}
7
  • All those blank lines look very suspicious. Can you make the example into a complete one, with a use case?
    – egreg
    May 31, 2013 at 22:46
  • @egreg I've added an MWE!
    – Chatterjee
    May 31, 2013 at 23:07
  • @egreg Any suggestions?
    – Chatterjee
    May 31, 2013 at 23:43
  • Verbatim environments are bad beasts.
    – egreg
    May 31, 2013 at 23:44
  • Should I drop the idea altogether? Or can something be done with the code?
    – Chatterjee
    May 31, 2013 at 23:44

1 Answer 1

4

This code could be cleaned up a little, but should give you most of what you need. Getting an optional argument for a verbatim environment, when there is no mandatory argument, is always tricky. See this for reference.

I renamed your environment to cpp so that I wouldn't have to dig in the minted internals, and put the optional argument before the mandatory argument, as is typical.

\documentclass[10pt]{article}

% Page layout
\usepackage[landscape,margin=0.5in]{geometry}
\usepackage{multicol}

% Code
\usepackage{minted}
\definecolor{col}{HTML}{F5EAB5}

%\input{minted_patch2.tex} % CONTAINS THE PATCHED CODE

\usemintedstyle{trac}
\newminted{cpp}{bgcolor=col, linenos=true}

\makeatletter

\newif\ifmintedminipage

\def\getoptarg[#1]{%
  \endgroup
  \ifthenelse{\equal{#1}{}}%
    {\mintedminipagefalse\begin{cppcode}}%
    {\mintedminipagetrue
      \begin{minipage}{#1}\begin{cppcode}}%
}

\newenvironment{cpp}%
  {\VerbatimEnvironment
    \begingroup\obeylines
    \@ifnextchar[{\getoptarg}{\getoptarg[]}}%
  {\end{cppcode}%
    \ifmintedminipage\end{minipage}\fi
  }

\newenvironment{cpp*}[2][]%
  {\VerbatimEnvironment
    \ifthenelse{\equal{#1}{}}%
      {\mintedminipagefalse\begin{cppcode*}{#2}}%
      {\mintedminipagetrue
        \begin{minipage}{#1}\begin{cppcode*}{#2}}%
  }%
  {\end{cppcode*}%
    \ifmintedminipage\end{minipage}\fi
  }

\makeatother


\newcommand{\keyw}[1]{\texttt{\textbf{#1}}}    

\title{}
\author{}
\date{}

\begin{document}
\begin{multicols}{2}
\maketitle

\section{Primitive Built-in Types}

\subsection{Literals}

Every literal has a type determined by its \textit{form} and \textit{value}

\subsubsection{Integer \& Floating Point Literals}

Integer literals can be represented using \textbf{decimal}, \textbf{octal}, or \textbf{hexadecimal} notations. Integer
literals that begin with \texttt{0} (zero) are interpreted as octal. Those that begin with either
\texttt{0x} or \texttt{0X} are interpreted as hexadecimal:

% Minipage width specified. NO on-the-fly options

\begin{cpp}[10cm]
20 /* decimal */ 024 /* octal */ 0x14 /* hexadecimal */
\end{cpp}

\begin{cpp}
20 /* decimal */ 024 /* octal */ 0x14 /* hexadecimal */
\end{cpp}

By default, decimal literals are signed. whereas octal and hexadecimal literals can either  be signed or unsigned. Decimal literal has the smallest type of \keyw{int}, \keyw{long}, or \keyw{long long} in which the value fits. Octal and hexadecimal literals have the smallest type of \keyw{int}, \keyw{unsigned int}, \keyw{long}, \keyw{unsigned long}, \keyw{long long}, or \keyw{unsinged long long}

Floating-point literals include either a decimal point or an exponent specified using scientific notation. Using scientific notation, the exponent is indicated by either E or e:

% Minipage width specified. WITH on-the-fly options

\begin{cpp*}[10cm]{linenos=false}
3.14159 3.14159E0 0. 0e0 .001
\end{cpp*}

\begin{cpp*}{linenos=false}
3.14159 3.14159E0 0. 0e0 .001
\end{cpp*}

\end{multicols}
\end{document}
5
  • Perfect! Works like a charm. Just one question though. How are the default options provided by newminted getting passed to these environments? Once again, thank you very much for the help. Much appreciated :)
    – Chatterjee
    Jun 1, 2013 at 4:50
  • Let's say if I want to change the language, how would I pass the name change to the environments?
    – Chatterjee
    Jun 1, 2013 at 4:57
  • The \newminted command creates cppcode and cppcode* environments. The default options are put into those environments at the time of definition; the options aren't stored somewhere and passed later. Changing the language is not supported. If you want multiple languages, you could create a pair of environments for each language. Or you could use something like my definition of cpp*, except with minted internally, and add a minted option key for the minipage width so that all options can be passed in a single optional argument.
    – G. Poore
    Jun 1, 2013 at 5:03
  • Just an update: I incorporated your code into minted.sty and everything is working smoothly for the time being. I also tried out pythontex, and boy was it fast! Just one thing though, I tried defining a new environment where I embedded a pygments environment inside a minipage environment, but it wasn't working. On the other hand, there was absolutely no problem in embedding pygment inside a tabularx cell.
    – Chatterjee
    Jun 2, 2013 at 8:36
  • 1
    I recently learnt about the varwidth package which allows for automatic width adjustment for minipages based on the natural width of the text. Any suggestions on how I can incorporate the varwidth environment to enclose the minted environment? I tried wrapping the minted environments with this in minted.sty, but am getting some weird errors
    – Chatterjee
    Jun 26, 2013 at 2:35

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .