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I just want to get more document classes. I just started running Ubuntu 12.04. I barely know how to navigate the terminal. I'm trying to edit my resume on TeXWorks, but I don't have the resume document class.

Most of the materials I've found online have been very unhelpful, and presume a large understanding of the OS. In fact, all the Ubuntu materials seem to presume a large understanding of the OS. If you happen to know a good Ubuntu manual, that would help too.

Sorry for the rookie question.

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    Please take a look at tobi.oetiker.ch/lshort/lshort.pdf – user13907 Jun 21 '13 at 14:10
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    The general rule of thumb for Linux based systems is to avoid the package manager of the OS and install your own version of TeX Live directly. This will probably solve most of your "I don't have X" problems, since a full install of TeX Live will have almost everything you need. See How to install "vanilla" TeXLive on Debian or Ubuntu? – Alan Munn Jun 21 '13 at 14:12
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    @papiro Although lshort is a good introduction to LaTeX, I don't think it addresses the kind of question that Harrison has directly. And in fact, I would say that its recommendation about using your package manager to install TeX Live is bad advice. See Adding a CTAN package to a MacPorts-maintained TeX installation for some discussion of why. – Alan Munn Jun 21 '13 at 14:14
  • How do you have LaTeX on your system? (Is it through the software manager?). The simplest advice is to put 'unusual' .cls and .sty files in the directory where your .tex file is. This is enough to get you going, but it is not very 'portable' since every project directory would need a copy of the (say) .cls file when you want to use it. So you could also do in a terminal mkdir -p ~/texmf/tex/latex, and put your custom .cls and .sty files there. If you have some form of TeX Live installed, it should search that directory automatically. – jon Jun 21 '13 at 14:45
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    sudo apt-get install texlive-full – user2574 Jun 22 '13 at 7:51
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The general rule of thumb for Linux based systems is to avoid the package manager of the OS and install your own version of TeX Live directly. This will probably solve most of your "I don't have X" problems, since a full install of TeX Live will have almost everything you need. See:

For some discussion on why this is the preferred method, and why the Linux package management system is not appropriate for managing a TeX Live system, see the following question (which deals with MacPorts, but it applicable to any Linux system too.)

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