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I am using a template provided by our university. I have read and tried many way to remove the indent from the first line in a paragraph.

I have the paragraph below:

\paragraph{1. Number of Sides (n)\\}
For each iteration, every segment of the figure from the previous iteration 
will be converted to four segments in the following iteration. Since we begin 
with three sides, the formula for the number of sides in the Koch curve is

it prints:

  1. Number of Sides (n)

     For each iteration, every segment of the figure from the previous iteration will be converted to four segments in the following iteration. Since we begin with three sides, the formula for the number of sides in the Koch curve is

where it leave a space at the beginning of the first line.

I don't want this indent, I tried \noindent and \setlength\parindent{0pt} but they didn't work.

I tried \textit, it did not indent the first line but it indents the "1. Number of Sides (n)" itself.

I can not use \subsubsection because it sub of \subsubsection.

If you have a command that will perform this, I would appreciate it.

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  • Sectional units and spacing is usually document class-specific. Since you're using a "university template", please provide a link to the source. Also, instead of providing code snippets, please include a minimal working example (MWE) that replicates the problem. This way it's easy for the community to have a workable piece of code from which to search for answers. It speeds things up tremendously.
    – Werner
    Jul 16, 2013 at 2:28
  • @Werner I am using the third template which is latex. unb.ca/etd/steps/step1.html
    – Lara
    Jul 16, 2013 at 3:17
  • Welcome to TeX.sx! Your post was migrated here from Stack Overflow. Please register on this site, too, and make sure that both accounts are associated with each other (by using the same OpenID), otherwise you won't be able to comment on or accept answers or edit your question.
    – Werner
    Jul 16, 2013 at 12:15

1 Answer 1

5

You can attempt to use

enter image description here

\paragraph{1. Number of Sides (n)\\}
For each iteration, every segment of the figure from the previous iteration 
will be converted to four segments in the following iteration. Since we begin 
with three sides, the formula for the number of sides in the Koch curve is

\paragraph{1. Number of Sides (n)} \mbox{}\par\nobreak
\noindent For each iteration, every segment of the figure from the previous iteration 
will be converted to four segments in the following iteration. Since we begin 
with three sides, the formula for the number of sides in the Koch curve is

The above technically finished the paragraph initiated by \paragraph, inserts a blank box and starts a new \paragraph. \nobreak ensures that the paragraph title and subsequent paragraph stays together near a page break, while \noindent ensures that the paragraph doesn't have an indent.

There are better ways of doing this, but I'm not sure to what extent you would use this, and what other limitations you might have in terms of packages. Moreover, manually numbering sectional titles (\paragraph is a sectional unit) is error-prone.

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